Overview participating exhibitions

Metropolis
2011

Metropolis

Evan Abramson

Orphan Nation (Haiti, 2010)

Despite the presence of a myriad of relief agencies in Haiti and billions of dollars in aid, six months after the devastating earthquake of 12 January, 2010, only 10% of the rubble had been cleared away. Evan Abramson asks whether the the voice of the Haitians was in fact being heard. “It is a land that appears to be suspended between destruction and recovery, between progress, revolt and normality,” he says. His nocturnal portraits of the orphaned children of Port-au-Prince, combined with images of the destruction, summon up a insistent image of a people who have been left in the lurch.

  • Orphan Nation

    Haïti, 2010

  • Orphan Nation

    Haïti, 2010

  • Orphan Nation

    Haïti, 2010

Land
2010

Land

Evan Abramson

WHEN THE WATER ENDS (Kenya, Ethiopia, 2010)

In the spring of 2010 the photographer Evan Abramson travelled through the region along the bor-der between Kenya and Ethiopia to survey the consequences of climate change for the semi-nomadic tribes there. He discovered that more frequent acute droughts were fuelling tensions be-tween tribes who are dependent on the too scarce water and the too sparse pasturage. Moreover, with its construction of a dam on the Omo River, the Ethiopian government has disrupted a cycle that is of vital importance for half a million people who live from agriculture, livestock and fishing. The supply of Kalashnikovs is already leading to an increasing number of fatalities, and Abramson fears the situation will only get worse. It contributes to massive migration to the city, where lives as prostitutes and beggars await many.March 8, 2010. A young man from the Nyangatom tribe patrols a water access point on the border between Ethiopia and Kenya.

  • WHEN THE WATER ENDS (Kenya, Ethiopia, 2010)

    In the spring of 2010 the photographer Evan Abramson travelled through the region along the bor-der between Kenya and Ethiopia to survey the consequences of climate change for the semi-nomadic tribes there. He discovered that more frequent acute droughts were fuelling tensions be-tween tribes who are dependent on the too scarce water and the too sparse pasturage. Moreover, with its construction of a dam on the Omo River, the Ethiopian government has disrupted a cycle that is of vital importance for half a million people who live from agriculture, livestock and fishing. The supply of Kalashnikovs is already leading to an increasing number of fatalities, and Abramson fears the situation will only get worse. It contributes to massive migration to the city, where lives as prostitutes and beggars await many.

    March 8, 2010. A young man from the Nyangatom tribe patrols a water access point on the border between Ethiopia and Kenya.

  • WHEN THE WATER ENDS (Kenya, Ethiopia, 2010)

    Een Dassanech-tiener, bewapend met een Kalashnikov, hoedt honderden koeien in het dorp Toltale. In het niemandsland tussen grensposten in Kenia en Ethiopië voeren de Dassanech regelmatig aanvallen uit op de naburige Turkana-stam. Ze stelen daarbij dieren, vernietigen visnetten en plegen rituele moorden die hun aanzien binnen hun stam vergroten. De moordpartijen zorgen er ook voor dat de Dassanech de controle blijven houden over de uitgestrekte vlaktes waar de rivier Omo samenkomt met het Turkanameer. 3 maart 2010.

  • WHEN THE WATER ENDS (Kenya, Ethiopia, 2010)

    February 28, 2010. The dried, starved corpses of sheep, goats and cows are left discarded in a pile outside the Turkana village of Todenyang. A reminder of the widespread impact that three years of consecutive drought have had on the tribes of northern Kenya, whose livelihoods have depended almost entirely on the raising of livestock for thousands of years.

  • WHEN THE WATER ENDS (Kenya, Ethiopia, 2010)

    March 21, 2010. East of the Omo Valley, displaced Somali girls and women from the Gabra clan dig with cups and dishes in the sand of a dry riverbed in search of drinking water near their camp. Between 2008 and 2009, 107 Borana and Gabra killed each other near the town of Arero in fighting over water and pasture. The Borana greatly outnumbered the Gabra, however, and 5,000 Gabra were displaced. Outside the town of Hudet in the Somali region, 3,000 displaced Gabra have set up camp, surviving almost entirely on food aid and NGO assistance.

Biography

Evan Abramson (US, 1978) specialises in long-term documentary work and multimedia approaches to narrative, with a focus on issues of social and environmental crisis. His work has among others appeared in The New York Times, The Washington Post, Newsweek and The Atlantic Monthly. He was nominated in 2009 and 2011 for the Anthropographia Award for Photography and Human Rights.

Website Abramson

Shop

Metropolis - City Life in the Urban Age

Metropolis - City Life in the Urban Age

Price EUR 17,50

Land - Country Life in the Urban Age

Land - Country Life in the Urban Age

Price EUR 15,00