Overview participating exhibitions

The Sweet and Sour Story of Sugar - The Exhibition
2013

The Sweet and Sour Story of Sugar - The Exhibition

Francesco Zizola

Bitter Harvest (Brazil)

Francesco Zizola investigated the life and work of sugar cane cutters in the North-east of Brazil. The Dutch landed briefly in this region in the early 17th century, fighting over sugar profits with the Portuguese. Remnants of colonial power structures remain visible in the local society today, while strenuous manual labour by cane cutters is still an essential part of the sugar industry. Yet significant improvements have been taking place in the Brazilian industry. Due to the country’s economic boom, a shortage of cheap manual labour has ushered in a rapid increase in wages and close scrutiny of labour conditions by the state.

  • Bitter Harvest

  • Bitter Harvest

  • Bitter Harvest

  • Bitter Harvest

  • Bitter Harvest

The Sweet and Sour Story of Sugar
2012

The Sweet and Sour Story of Sugar

Francesco Zizola

Bitter Harvest (Brazil 2011)

Francesco Zizola (Italy) investigates the life and work of sugar cane cutters in the Northeast part of Brazil. The Dutch touched ground briefly in this region in the early 17th century, fighting over sugar profits with the Portuguese. Remnants of colonial power structures remain visible in society up to this day.

Despite steps taken in the social field, for example large government campaigns against slave-like working conditions, there is still progress to be made. Both social and environmental issues worsen in the fields that are further away from government control. Sugar production in Northeast Brazil shows the struggle of an upcoming economic world power, to shake of its past. 

  • Bitter Harvest (Brazil 2011)

    José Antonio Silva has been working as a sugar cane cutter since childhood. He is paid by the piece, but he needs to secure his own harvesting equipment and to travel to the plantation by his own means. He earns an average of 480 real per month (240 dollars) and works 6 days a week. Near Palmares.
    © Francesco Zizola/NOOR

  • Bitter Harvest (Brazil 2011)

    Mauricio Gomes De Lima from Aliança, 41, is a victim of pesticide poisoning. He used to spray pesticides in sugar cane fields at Usina São José, but in 2004 he started to experience a variety of health complications, all dismissed as mere trifles by the farm infirmary. He was later diagnosed with a permanent neurological damage caused by a mixture of toxic substances used as pesticides in farming. After the diagnosis, the Usina São José fired Mauricio and claims not to have ever hired him. According to Mauricio, some employees in the same line of work have died of pesticide poisoning.
    © Francesco Zizola/NOOR

  • Bitter Harvest (Brazil 2011)

    A sugar cane field controlled burning is carried out during the night in Vitória de Santo Antão. In the burning process, the field is set ablaze and the leaves are burned off from the stalks, making the cane cutting process easier.
    © Francesco Zizola/NOOR

Act of Faith
2007

Act of Faith

Francesco Zizola

NUBA (Sudan, 1997-2002)

The Nuba Mountains, lying in the middle of Sudan, are a natural barrier between the black Christian and the Arab Islamic parts of Africa. With the introduction of Sharia - Islamic law and administration of justice - in Sudan in 1983, the mountains became a good refuge for the Nuba. That tribe rebelled against the Sharia, just as did the south Sudanese, largely Christian and animist rebels. For decades the Nuba were isolated from the world, living under almost prehistoric conditions. Francesco Zizola traveled five times to the Nuba Mountains to record how the Nuba sought to survive, maintaining their own traditions. The discovery of oil in the mountains possibly presages better times.

  • NUBA (Sudan, 1997-2002)

    The Nuba Mountains, lying in the middle of Sudan, are a natural barrier between the black Christian and the Arab Islamic parts of Africa. With the introduction of Sharia - Islamic law and administration of justice - in Sudan in 1983, the mountains became a good refuge for the Nuba. That tribe rebelled against the Sharia, just as did the south Sudanese, largely Christian and animist rebels. For decades the Nuba were isolated from the world, living under almost prehistoric conditions. Francesco Zizola traveled five times to the Nuba Mountains to record how the Nuba sought to survive, maintaining their own traditions. The discovery of oil in the mountains possibly presages better times.

  • NUBA (Sudan, 1997-2002)

  • NUBA (Sudan, 1997-2002)

  • NUBA (Sudan, 1997-2002)

  • NUBA (Sudan, 1997-2002)

Traces & Omens
2005

Traces & Omens

Francesco Zizola

MOZAMBIQUE: AIDS - THE SILENT ATOMIC BOMB (2002)

More than a million people in Mozambique are HIV positive - 13% of the population. Treatment for the virus costs 350 dollars per person for a year, but the annual budget for health care is only 10 dollars per year per head. As a consequence of AIDS, life expectancy in Mozambique will have fallen from 43 to 27 by 2010, a level not seen since the 19th century. Photographer Francesco Zizola documented the crisis, and took its title MOZAMBIQUE: AIDS - THE SILENT ATOMIC BOMB (2002) from a speech by the prime minister of the country. He had warned that the consequences of AIDS are greater for the continent than if an atomic bomb had been dropped on Africa. In the latter case, at least the international community would have reacted, Zizola thinks. As it is, the 'silent atomic bomb' continues to explode, without the world doing anything.

  • MOZAMBIQUE: AIDS - THE SILENT ATOMIC BOMB (2002)

    More than a million people in Mozambique are HIV positive - 13% of the population. Treatment for the virus costs 350 dollars per person for a year, but the annual budget for health care is only 10 dollars per year per head. As a consequence of AIDS, life expectancy in Mozambique will have fallen from 43 to 27 by 2010, a level not seen since the 19th century. Photographer Francesco Zizola documented the crisis, and took its title MOZAMBIQUE: AIDS - THE SILENT ATOMIC BOMB (2002) from a speech by the prime minister of the country. He had warned that the consequences of AIDS are greater for the continent than if an atomic bomb had been dropped on Africa. In the latter case, at least the international community would have reacted, Zizola thinks. As it is, the 'silent atomic bomb' continues to explode, without the world doing anything.

  • MOZAMBIQUE: AIDS - THE SILENT ATOMIC BOMB (2002)

  • MOZAMBIQUE: AIDS - THE SILENT ATOMIC BOMB (2002)

  • MOZAMBIQUE: AIDS - THE SILENT ATOMIC BOMB (2002)

  • MOZAMBIQUE: AIDS - THE SILENT ATOMIC BOMB (2002)

Biography

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Act of Faith

Act of Faith

Price EUR 10,00

Traces & Omens

Traces & Omens

Price EUR 10,00