Overview participating exhibitions

Oculus
2011

Oculus

Ken Schles

OCULUS

We infuse the world we encounter with meaning, with social and symbolic significance based on the value we place upon representations we share. This, perhaps, is the irony of our conceptualizations: We make and share images so that we may know the world. But what exactly is the nature of our image representations? And what are the implications of using the metaphor of the image to signify, codify and describe a dynamic and ephemeral world? Spurred on by private upheavals to reappraise the connections we have to images and memory, master photographer Ken Schles takes you with Oculus on a personal philosophic journey that points beyond the shadow-play of images. It is a meditation on the nature of perception and existence in the grey light of this world.

  • OCULUS

    We infuse the world we encounter with meaning, with social and symbolic significance based on the value we place upon representations we share. This, perhaps, is the irony of our conceptualizations: We make and share images so that we may know the world. But what exactly is the nature of our image representations? And what are the implications of using the metaphor of the image to signify, codify and describe a dynamic and ephemeral world? Spurred on by private upheavals to reappraise the connections we have to images and memory, master photographer Ken Schles takes you with Oculus on a personal philosophic journey that points beyond the shadow-play of images. It is a meditation on the nature of perception and existence in the grey light of this world.

  • OCULUS

    We infuse the world we encounter with meaning, with social and symbolic significance based on the value we place upon representations we share. This, perhaps, is the irony of our conceptualizations: We make and share images so that we may know the world. But what exactly is the nature of our image representations? And what are the implications of using the metaphor of the image to signify, codify and describe a dynamic and ephemeral world? Spurred on by private upheavals to reappraise the connections we have to images and memory, master photographer Ken Schles takes you with Oculus on a personal philosophic journey that points beyond the shadow-play of images. It is a meditation on the nature of perception and existence in the grey light of this world.

  • OCULUS

    We infuse the world we encounter with meaning, with social and symbolic significance based on the value we place upon representations we share. This, perhaps, is the irony of our conceptualizations: We make and share images so that we may know the world. But what exactly is the nature of our image representations? And what are the implications of using the metaphor of the image to signify, codify and describe a dynamic and ephemeral world? Spurred on by private upheavals to reappraise the connections we have to images and memory, master photographer Ken Schles takes you with Oculus on a personal philosophic journey that points beyond the shadow-play of images. It is a meditation on the nature of perception and existence in the grey light of this world.

  • OCULUS

    We infuse the world we encounter with meaning, with social and symbolic significance based on the value we place upon representations we share. This, perhaps, is the irony of our conceptualizations: We make and share images so that we may know the world. But what exactly is the nature of our image representations? And what are the implications of using the metaphor of the image to signify, codify and describe a dynamic and ephemeral world? Spurred on by private upheavals to reappraise the connections we have to images and memory, master photographer Ken Schles takes you with Oculus on a personal philosophic journey that points beyond the shadow-play of images. It is a meditation on the nature of perception and existence in the grey light of this world.

More Intensified!
2009

More Intensified!

Ken Schles

MORE INTENSIFIED!

Ken Schles shows a selection from his large archive of photos: pictures he shot of diverse musicians such as Alicia Keys and Rod Stewart, but also Black Rebel Motorcycle Club and 16 Horsepower. With his photos he wants to provide the viewer with a deeper understanding, a richer experience, and offer insight into someone whom you will probably never meet and whose music you may or may not know. Presently the recording industry and artists prefer slick images: illustration, theater, fiction. But Schles has striven to do something genuine, even though doing photo portraits always bends the truth. "I have tried to be an honest broker between musicians and the public, and to show real, perhaps even vulnerable individuals. You can look at these photos and think that you are seeing a number of famous rock stars. I don't do that. I see only people, just as tragic and as full of hope as you and I."

  • MORE INTENSIFIED!

    Ken Schles shows a selection from his large archive of photos: pictures he shot of diverse musicians such as Alicia Keys and Rod Stewart, but also Black Rebel Motorcycle Club and 16 Horsepower. With his photos he wants to provide the viewer with a deeper understanding, a richer experience, and offer insight into someone whom you will probably never meet and whose music you may or may not know. Presently the recording industry and artists prefer slick images: illustration, theater, fiction. But Schles has striven to do something genuine, even though doing photo portraits always bends the truth. "I have tried to be an honest broker between musicians and the public, and to show real, perhaps even vulnerable individuals. You can look at these photos and think that you are seeing a number of famous rock stars. I don't do that. I see only people, just as tragic and as full of hope as you and I."

  • MORE INTENSIFIED!

    Ken Schles shows a selection from his large archive of photos: pictures he shot of diverse musicians such as Alicia Keys and Rod Stewart, but also Black Rebel Motorcycle Club and 16 Horsepower. With his photos he wants to provide the viewer with a deeper understanding, a richer experience, and offer insight into someone whom you will probably never meet and whose music you may or may not know. Presently the recording industry and artists prefer slick images: illustration, theater, fiction. But Schles has striven to do something genuine, even though doing photo portraits always bends the truth. "I have tried to be an honest broker between musicians and the public, and to show real, perhaps even vulnerable individuals. You can look at these photos and think that you are seeing a number of famous rock stars. I don't do that. I see only people, just as tragic and as full of hope as you and I."

  • MORE INTENSIFIED!

    Ken Schles shows a selection from his large archive of photos: pictures he shot of diverse musicians such as Alicia Keys and Rod Stewart, but also Black Rebel Motorcycle Club and 16 Horsepower. With his photos he wants to provide the viewer with a deeper understanding, a richer experience, and offer insight into someone whom you will probably never meet and whose music you may or may not know. Presently the recording industry and artists prefer slick images: illustration, theater, fiction. But Schles has striven to do something genuine, even though doing photo portraits always bends the truth. "I have tried to be an honest broker between musicians and the public, and to show real, perhaps even vulnerable individuals. You can look at these photos and think that you are seeing a number of famous rock stars. I don't do that. I see only people, just as tragic and as full of hope as you and I."

  • MORE INTENSIFIED!

    Ken Schles shows a selection from his large archive of photos: pictures he shot of diverse musicians such as Alicia Keys and Rod Stewart, but also Black Rebel Motorcycle Club and 16 Horsepower. With his photos he wants to provide the viewer with a deeper understanding, a richer experience, and offer insight into someone whom you will probably never meet and whose music you may or may not know. Presently the recording industry and artists prefer slick images: illustration, theater, fiction. But Schles has striven to do something genuine, even though doing photo portraits always bends the truth. "I have tried to be an honest broker between musicians and the public, and to show real, perhaps even vulnerable individuals. You can look at these photos and think that you are seeing a number of famous rock stars. I don't do that. I see only people, just as tragic and as full of hope as you and I."

  • MORE INTENSIFIED!

    Ken Schles shows a selection from his large archive of photos: pictures he shot of diverse musicians such as Alicia Keys and Rod Stewart, but also Black Rebel Motorcycle Club and 16 Horsepower. With his photos he wants to provide the viewer with a deeper understanding, a richer experience, and offer insight into someone whom you will probably never meet and whose music you may or may not know. Presently the recording industry and artists prefer slick images: illustration, theater, fiction. But Schles has striven to do something genuine, even though doing photo portraits always bends the truth. "I have tried to be an honest broker between musicians and the public, and to show real, perhaps even vulnerable individuals. You can look at these photos and think that you are seeing a number of famous rock stars. I don't do that. I see only people, just as tragic and as full of hope as you and I."

Traces & Omens
2005

Traces & Omens

Ken Schles

HOMELAND SECURITY (2004-2005)

As a resident of New York, Ken Schles witnessed the attack on the Twin Towers. He photographed the tragedy, which according to him lead to a new world order in which fear reigned. Since September 11 the manner of waging war has changed, says Schles. In terms of tactics, psychology and propaganda, the battlefield has moved from a military terrain to civil society. Schles recorded the consequences for daily life in New York. For HOMELAND SECURITY (2004-2005) he photographed quiet, loving and ominous moments and mixed these with photographs of places that are considered likely targets for terrorist attacks, creating a reflection on safe places that from one day to the next change into dangerous territory.

  • HOMELAND SECURITY (2004-2005)

    As a resident of New York, Ken Schles witnessed the attack on the Twin Towers. He photographed the tragedy, which according to him lead to a new world order in which fear reigned. Since September 11 the manner of waging war has changed, says Schles. In terms of tactics, psychology and propaganda, the battlefield has moved from a military terrain to civil society. Schles recorded the consequences for daily life in New York. For HOMELAND SECURITY (2004-2005) he photographed quiet, loving and ominous moments and mixed these with photographs of places that are considered likely targets for terrorist attacks, creating a reflection on safe places that from one day to the next change into dangerous territory.

  • HOMELAND SECURITY (2004-2005)

  • HOMELAND SECURITY (2004-2005)

  • HOMELAND SECURITY (2004-2005)

  • HOMELAND SECURITY (2004-2005)

Promised Land
2005

Promised Land

Ken Schles

Sense of Space
2001

Sense of Space

Ken Schles

REPOSITORIES

After Schles had finished off his now famous photo book "Invisible City" (1990), he settled in the East Village, in New York City. It is a neighbourhood of heroine dealers, artists plodding away toward a breakthrough that never comes, squatters, immigrants and other lost souls. Over the course of time he saw familiar residents disappear as a consequence of AIDS, drugs or careers. In their place came yuppie residents - with money. In REPOSITORIES Schles recalls memories of the East Village before the metamorphosis. He can not make time stand still, or prevent the departure of friends, but in the photographs he can give shape to his feeling of that era. It is a series on the meaning of a personal environment and the value that the smallest objects can possess.

  • REPOSITORIES

    After Schles had finished off his now famous photo book "Invisible City" (1990), he settled in the East Village, in New York City. It is a neighbourhood of heroine dealers, artists plodding away toward a breakthrough that never comes, squatters, immigrants and other lost souls. Over the course of time he saw familiar residents disappear as a consequence of AIDS, drugs or careers. In their place came yuppie residents - with money. In REPOSITORIES Schles recalls memories of the East Village before the metamorphosis. He can not make time stand still, or prevent the departure of friends, but in the photographs he can give shape to his feeling of that era. It is a series on the meaning of a personal environment and the value that the smallest objects can possess.

  • REPOSITORIES

  • REPOSITORIES

  • REPOSITORIES

  • REPOSITORIES

Wonderland
1999

Wonderland

Ken Schles

Biography

Ken Schles (US, b. 1960) made his name in 1990 with the influential and now classic photo book Invisible City. His books are discribed as 'intellectual milestones in photography' (Süddeutsche Zeitung); 'hellishly briliant' (The New Yorker) and 'a rare gem' (1000 Words Photography). His work is included in private and public collections such as MoMA, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Brooklyn Museum and The Art Institute of Chicago, among others.    

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  • Shop

    Oculus

    Oculus

    Price EUR 39,50

    Traces & Omens

    Traces & Omens

    Price EUR 10,00

    Promised Land

    Promised Land

    Price EUR 10,00

    Sense of Space

    Sense of Space

    Price EUR 10,00

    Wonderland

    Wonderland

    Price EUR 0,00