Overview participating exhibitions

Lost
2009

Lost

Kosuke Okahara

IBASYO, SELF-MUTILATION IN JAPAN (Japan, 2007)

There is almost nowhere else on earth where the individual is under such great pressure to perform as in Japan. It is the land of hikikimori – voluntary self-isolation by young people who can no longer cope with the pressures of society. The photographer Kosuke Okahara has focused on another outgrowth: self-mutilation. Particularly young women damage their own bodies, sometimes in an attempt to exercise control over their own lives, sometimes in order to ‘just still feel something’. Often the self-harming is the result of a history of physical and sexual abuse. By revealing the self-mutilation Okahara hopes to break through the prevailing taboo around the subject.

  • IBASYO, SELF-MUTILATION IN JAPAN (Japan, 2007)

    There is almost nowhere else on earth where the individual is under such great pressure to perform as in Japan. It is the land of hikikimori – voluntary self-isolation by young people who can no longer cope with the pressures of society. The photographer Kosuke Okahara has focused on another outgrowth: self-mutilation. Particularly young women damage their own bodies, sometimes in an attempt to exercise control over their own lives, sometimes in order to ‘just still feel something’. Often the self-harming is the result of a history of physical and sexual abuse. By revealing the self-mutilation Okahara hopes to break through the prevailing taboo around the subject.

  • IBASYO, SELF-MUTILATION IN JAPAN (Japan, 2007)

  • IBASYO, SELF-MUTILATION IN JAPAN (Japan, 2007)

  • IBASYO, SELF-MUTILATION IN JAPAN (Japan, 2007)

  • IBASYO, SELF-MUTILATION IN JAPAN (Japan, 2007)

Biography

Ibasyo, Self-Mutilation in Japan (2007)

There is almost nowhere else on earth where the individual is under such great pressure to perform as in Japan. It is the land of hikikimori – voluntary self-isolation by young people who can no longer cope with the pressures of society. The photographer Kosuke Okahara has focused on another outgrowth: self-mutilation. Particularly young women damage their own bodies, sometimes in an attempt to exercise control over their own lives, sometimes in order to ‘just still feel something’. Often the self-harming is the result of a history of physical and sexual abuse. By revealing the self-mutilation Okahara hopes to break through the prevailing taboo around the subject.

Kosuke Okahara (Japan, 1980) is occupied with the subject of ibasyo, which means something like ‘the emotional and physical place in which a person can still exist’. He photographed refugees in Darfur and delved into the criminality on the underside of Colombian society. His work has appeared frequently in Japanese and American magazines and has been shown in various Japanese museums.

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Human Conditions

Human Conditions

Price EUR 15,00