Overview participating exhibitions

Noorderlicht Photogallery
2017

Noorderlicht Photogallery

Michael Najjar

outer space (2011-present)

Space exploration has received renewed attention in recent years, partly through the emergence of commercial space travel. It demonstrates our innate curiosity and our desire to push the boundaries. Leaving the earth also deepens our understanding of it: who are we, where do we come from, what do we leave behind for future generations? Michael Najjar visited space ports and laboratories and met with numerous scientists and astronauts for a series that blends documentary and fictional scenarios about space exploration. His personal approach is extraordinary: Najjar booked a space flight at Virgin Galactic, in SpaceShipTwo. He’ll be the first artist in space, and is currently following an intensive training programme at space centres in Germany, Russia and the United States. From flying in a MiG-29 fighter jet in the stratosphere and zero-gravity flights to training sessions in a centrifuge, underwater space walks in a heavy space suit and a parachute jump from a height of ten thousand metres – with his camera Najjar captures the extremes he is subjected to in order to research and exemplify his own physical and mental responses.
Exhibition works courtesy the artist

  • "liquid gravity"

  • "golden eye II"

  • "final mission"

  • "orbital debris"

  • "europa"

Terra Cognita
2012

Terra Cognita

Michael Najjar

High Altitude

In January, 2009, Michael Najjar stood on the top of Aconcagua, the highest mountain in the world outside of Asia. The photographic material that he assembled there formed the basis for a series on the fluctuations in financial markets. Najjar visualized the indexes of the world’s most important stock exchanges and made virtual data tangible by giving it the form of serrated mountain tops. The work is a metaphor for the thin line that separates the real and the virtual, a line which in the Exchanges – where virtual money has become more important than the goods and firms that it is supposed to represent – has become blurred perhaps more than anywhere else.

  • Dow Jones 80-09


Metropolis
2011

Metropolis

Michael Najjar

LIQUID CITIES (2011)

As in all his work, in LIQUID CITIES Michael Najjar investigates the society of the future, which, according to him, will be dominated by information technology. He works out a largely theoretical concept: architecture that is not rigid, but which is comprised of flexible forms that are constantly in motion. In LIQUID CITY cities are literally fluid – buildings change with the requirements of their users. The boundary between architecture and cyberspace blurs – a development that we are now already seeing in smart cities and Tokyo’s new Media City.

  • LIQUID CITIES (2011)

  • LIQUID CITIES (2011)

Material World
2007

Material World

Michael Najjar

BIONIC ANGEL (Germany, 2006)

With increasing frequency, man is playing God. Developments in genetics, robotics, computer science and nanotechnology intervene with our bodies, our minds, our identity and our offspring. All these sciences are directed toward improving mankind. Genetic and technological possibilities hold out the promise of a superior humanity, strikingly enough rooted as far back as in classical antiquity. The idealized image of man that was the norm there was rediscovered in the Renaissance as the perfect image of human control over body and mind. Michael Najjar unites this timeless ideal in a playful metamorphosis of old and new representations of the ideal human.

  • BIONIC ANGEL (Germany, 2006)

    With increasing frequency, man is playing God. Developments in genetics, robotics, computer science and nanotechnology intervene with our bodies, our minds, our identity and our offspring. All these sciences are directed toward improving mankind. Genetic and technological possibilities hold out the promise of a superior humanity, strikingly enough rooted as far back as in classical antiquity. The idealized image of man that was the norm there was rediscovered in the Renaissance as the perfect image of human control over body and mind. Michael Najjar unites this timeless ideal in a playful metamorphosis of old and new representations of the ideal human.

  • BIONIC ANGEL (Germany, 2006)

Traces & Omens
2005

Traces & Omens

Michael Najjar

INFORMATION AND APOCALYPSE (2003)

The events of September 11, 2001, have had great consequences, not in the least for our perception of things, says Michael Najjar. The manner in which the media treat war and terrorism has changed drastically since then. The war in Iraq could be followed live on broadcasters such as CNN, sometimes even 24 hours a day. The reporting was often exciting and spectacular, and drew strongly on the vocabulary of Hollywood films. Furthermore, there was the question of to what extent one could even call this reporting: wasn't it really directed by the Pentagon? For INFORMATION AND APOCALYPSE (2003) Michael Najjar mixed images of September 11 and the Iraq war with his own photo work, thus providing a new context for information from the media. With this unique visual editing he shows how the invasion of Iraq and the war on terror is first and foremost a media event.

  • INFORMATION AND APOCALYPSE (2003)

    The events of September 11, 2001, have had great consequences, not in the least for our perception of things, says Michael Najjar. The manner in which the media treat war and terrorism has changed drastically since then. The war in Iraq could be followed live on broadcasters such as CNN, sometimes even 24 hours a day. The reporting was often exciting and spectacular, and drew strongly on the vocabulary of Hollywood films. Furthermore, there was the question of to what extent one could even call this reporting: wasn't it really directed by the Pentagon? For INFORMATION AND APOCALYPSE (2003) Michael Najjar mixed images of September 11 and the Iraq war with his own photo work, thus providing a new context for information from the media. With this unique visual editing he shows how the invasion of Iraq and the war on terror is first and foremost a media event.

  • INFORMATION AND APOCALYPSE (2003)

  • INFORMATION AND APOCALYPSE (2003)

  • INFORMATION AND APOCALYPSE (2003)

  • INFORMATION AND APOCALYPSE (2003)

  • INFORMATION AND APOCALYPSE (2003)

  • NETROPOLIS (2003-2005)

    The Industrial Revolution changed the face of the large metropolises radically. The impact of digitization is no less great. To an important extent computers and computer networks define the development of the urban landscape. Cities no longer exist in a physical sense alone, but also have a digital double. The city itself has become a mixture of physical and digital space. Michael Najjar visualizes this new, partly invisible landscape in NETROPOLIS (2003-2005) (photo and video). From various angles he made panoramas of cities such as Berlin, Paris and Tokyo and pasted these over each other. The result is a landscape of lines which can be read as a carpet of digital relations, under which the contours of the selected cities remain visible.

Biography

Michael Najjar (West Germany, 1966) is a pioneer. His work oscillates between photography and information technology, between the present and the future. By mixing realistic elements with fiction he urges new ways of seeing and thinking. In 2008, his first retrospective was exhibited in the Fotomuseum and the GEM in The Hague. The leading publisher Distanz published a book in 2015 with photographs taken from the project outer space. Najjar’s work has been exhibited at the Noorderlicht Photo Festivals in 2005, 2007, 2011 and 2012.

Shop

Metropolis - City Life in the Urban Age

Metropolis - City Life in the Urban Age

Price EUR 17,50

Terra Cognita

Terra Cognita

Price EUR 15,00

Traces & Omens

Traces & Omens

Price EUR 10,00