Overview participating exhibitions

Cruel and Unusual
2012

Cruel and Unusual

Nathalie Mohadjer

THE DUNGEON

In the centre of the vast African continent, there is a constellation of misery. Fetid, isolated, and of- ten illegal, Burundi’s single-cell “cachot” prisons are off the radar of even many of the country’s human rights organisations. Children as young as ten crouch in the reeking dark of these dungeons, sometimes for years, often with no evidence against them, and rarely having seen the inside of a court room. The Burundian constitution states fourteen days as the maximum imprisonment; the reality is a violent miscarriage of any sense of justice. For many prisoners, the only crime they have encountered is that of their imprisonment, and torture at the hands of the police. Arrested for infractions as myriad as sorcery and murder - or in the case of 10 year old Eli-Davide in Cibitoki, for just watching a stranger stealing DVDs - the unlucky pass from the violent hands of the police to the abuses of life under prisoner chiefs.

  • THE DUNGEON, 2009

    In the centre of the vast African continent, there is a constellation of misery. Fetid, isolated, and of-
    ten illegal, Burundi’s single-cell “cachot” prisons are off the radar of even many of the country’s human rights organisations. Children as young as ten crouch in the reeking dark of these dungeons, sometimes for years, often with no evidence against them, and rarely having seen the inside of a court room. The Burundian constitution states fourteen days as the maximum imprisonment; the reality is a violent miscarriage of any sense of justice. For many prisoners, the only crime they have encountered is that of their imprisonment, and torture at the hands of the police. Arrested for infractions as myriad as sorcery and murder - or in the case of 10 year old Eli-Davide in Cibitoki, for just watching a stranger stealing DVDs - the unlucky pass from the violent hands of the police to the abuses of life under prisoner chiefs.

  • THE DUNGEON, 2009

    In the centre of the vast African continent, there is a constellation of misery. Fetid, isolated, and often illegal, Burundi’s single-cell “cachot” prisons are off the radar of even many of the country’s human rights organisations. Children as young as ten crouch in the reeking dark of these dungeons, sometimes for years, often with no evidence against them, and rarely having seen the inside of a court room. The Burundian constitution states fourteen days as the maximum imprisonment; the reality is a violent miscarriage of any sense of justice. For many prisoners, the only crime they have encountered is that of their imprisonment, and torture at the hands of the police. Arrested for infractions as myriad as sorcery and murder - or in the case of 10 year old Eli-Davide in Cibitoki, for just watching a stranger stealing DVDs - the unlucky pass from the violent hands of the police to the abuses of life under prisoner chiefs.

Biography

Nathalie Mohadjer (b. Kassel, germany, 1979) studied arts at the Bauhaus-University, Weimar, Germany. Her work has been exhibited a.o. at Museum Kunsthalle Weimar; GDK Gallery of fine Arts, Berlin; European New Year, Amsterdam; Kaunas Foto Festival, Lithuania; Galerie Chambre à Part, Strasbourg; Food for your Eyes, Paris. Her work has been published in Camera Austria, New York Times, Le Monde, Brand Eins, Zeit, and der Freitag, Mouvement.

In 2005 she was a member of the Asia Europe Forum for Young Photographers, Maison Europeenne de la Photographie Paris. In February 2008, Mohadjer received the german DAAD artist scholarship. She was the Laureat of Visa d’ ani, Visa pour l’ Image 2009, Perpignan. In 2010 she becomes a member of the French photographers collective Le bar Floreal and received the German VG-Bildkunst scholarship. She was a special mention of the City of Levallois-Epson Photography Award in 2011 and won the Abisag Tullmann prize 2011.

Nathalie lives and works in Paris.

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Cruel and Unusual

Cruel and Unusual

Price EUR 1,50