Photographers / Another Asia

Another Asia I

Dinh Q Lê

Dinh Q Lê

FROM VIETNAM TO HOLLYWOOD (2003-2005)

Dinh Q Lê weaves photos like Vietnamese grass mats, a technique that he learned as a boy from his aunt. In FROM VIETNAM TO HOLLYWOOD (2003-2005) he mixes stills from Hollywood films with anonymous black and white photos made in Vietnam. The film images come from Apocalypse Now, Indochine (with Catherine Deneuve) and Hamburger Hill. The photographs were made during the war in Vietnam. Dinh Q Lê explains his work by saying, 'Hollywood and the US are constantly trying to rewrite our memories of the Vietnam War. I struggle to keep alive the memories of the Vietnamese themselves from this time.'

Dinh Q Lê >>

  • FROM VIETNAM TO HOLLYWOOD (2003-2005)

    Dinh Q Lê weaves photos like Vietnamese grass mats, a technique that he learned as a boy from his aunt. In FROM VIETNAM TO HOLLYWOOD (2003-2005) he mixes stills from Hollywood films with anonymous black and white photos made in Vietnam. The film images come from Apocalypse Now, Indochine (with Catherine Deneuve) and Hamburger Hill. The photographs were made during the war in Vietnam. Dinh Q Lê explains his work by saying, 'Hollywood and the US are constantly trying to rewrite our memories of the Vietnam War. I struggle to keep alive the memories of the Vietnamese themselves from this time.'

  • FROM VIETNAM TO HOLLYWOOD (2003-2005)

  • FROM VIETNAM TO HOLLYWOOD (2003-2005)

Shahidul Alam

Shahidul Alam

NATURE'S FURY

On October 8, 2005, Kashmir was struck by a severe earthquake. The epicenter lay in the Pakistani sector. Cities were wiped from the face of the earth, mountainsides turned into avalanches of mud and rock. Nearly a hundred thousand people died, and four million were otherwise affected by the disaster. Shahidul Alam visited the Pakistani disaster area two months after the quake. People were still clearing away the ruins and seeking the bodies of victims. At the same time, houses were being rebuilt and the first improvised shops were reopening. 'Nature had shown its fury,' says the photographer. 'Now people were fighting back.'

Shahidul Alam >>

  • NATURE'S FURY

    On October 8, 2005, Kashmir was struck by a severe earthquake. The epicenter lay in the Pakistani sector. Cities were wiped from the face of the earth, mountainsides turned into avalanches of mud and rock. Nearly a hundred thousand people died, and four million were otherwise affected by the disaster. Shahidul Alam visited the Pakistani disaster area two months after the quake. People were still clearing away the ruins and seeking the bodies of victims. At the same time, houses were being rebuilt and the first improvised shops were reopening. 'Nature had shown its fury,' says the photographer. 'Now people were fighting back.'

  • NATURE'S FURY

  • NATURE'S FURY

  • NATURE'S FURY

  • NATURE'S FURY

Pablo Bartholomew

Pablo Bartholomew

EARLY WORK (1975-1982)

When he was fifteen Pablo Bartholomew, the son of intellectual immigrants from Pakistan and Burma, was expelled from school. His independent spirit drove him to the seamy side of New Delhi, which he recorded with a photo camera. At the age of 19 he won a prize at World Press Photo with a series on drug addiction. Attracted by the big city, in the early 1980s he moved to Mumbai. Although he earned his living on Bollywood film sets, he documented the city's street life in his free time. His blistering photographs in EARLY WORK (1975-1982) of eunuchs, pickpockets, opium addicts and prostitutes proved to be pioneering. Never before had India's raw street life been pictured so systematically. Since then such photo reportage has become commonplace in India.

Pablo Bartholomew >>

  • EARLY WORK (1975-1982)

    When he was fifteen Pablo Bartholomew, the son of intellectual immigrants from Pakistan and Burma, was expelled from school. His independent spirit drove him to the seamy side of New Delhi, which he recorded with a photo camera. At the age of 19 he won a prize at World Press Photo with a series on drug addiction. Attracted by the big city, in the early 1980s he moved to Mumbai. Although he earned his living on Bollywood film sets, he documented the city's street life in his free time. His blistering photographs in EARLY WORK (1975-1982) of eunuchs, pickpockets, opium addicts and prostitutes proved to be pioneering. Never before had India's raw street life been pictured so systematically. Since then such photo reportage has become commonplace in India.

  • EARLY WORK (1975-1982)

  • EARLY WORK (1975-1982)

  • EARLY WORK (1975-1982)

  • EARLY WORK (1975-1982)

Achinto Bhadra

Achinto Bhadra

MASKED PORTRAITS (2005)

The subjects of MASKED PORTRAITS (2005) are young Indian women who have been rescued from human trafficking. With the aid of clothing, poses and objects they represent their life in the past, that was permeated with deception, abuse and violence. In order to hide their identity, the women choose a character from the world of religion, mythology, folklore or television. For instance, we see elements of the housewife, Hindustani woman and Bollywood starlet, symbols for tradition, religion and beauty. At the same time, the masquerade represents the great change that the women have undergone with respect to their earlier lives.

Achinto Bhadra >>

  • MASKED PORTRAITS (2005)


    The subjects of MASKED PORTRAITS (2005) are young Indian women who have been rescued from human trafficking. With the aid of clothing, poses and objects they represent their life in the past, that was permeated with deception, abuse and violence. In order to hide their identity, the women choose a character from the world of religion, mythology, folklore or television. For instance, we see elements of the housewife, Hindustani woman and Bollywood starlet, symbols for tradition, religion and beauty. At the same time, the masquerade represents the great change that the women have undergone with respect to their earlier lives.

  • MASKED PORTRAITS (2005)

  • MASKED PORTRAITS (2005)

  • MASKED PORTRAITS (2005)

  • MASKED PORTRAITS (2005)

Zann Huizhen Huang

Zann Huizhen Huang

CAMBODIAN GLUE KIDS (2005)

Many homeless children in the Cambodian city of Siemreab, close to the famous temples of Angkor Wat, sniff glue. The resulting high is the CAMBODIAN GLUE KIDS (2005) way of briefly escaping from the pain and hunger that are inextricably bound up with their hard lives on the street. It is estimated that 40% of the children in Cambodia are addicted to sniffing glue. Especially the price makes it the most popular kind of drug. A hit of glue can be bought for as little as fifty cents. The children get the money they need by begging from tourists. Although sniffing glue is one of the largest problems in Cambodia today, the country still does not have any form of care for the addicts.

Zann Huizhen Huang >>

  • CAMBODIAN GLUE KIDS (2005)

    Many homeless children in the Cambodian city of Siemreab, close to the famous temples of Angkor Wat, sniff glue. The resulting high is the CAMBODIAN GLUE KIDS (2005) way of briefly escaping from the pain and hunger that are inextricably bound up with their hard lives on the street. It is estimated that 40% of the children in Cambodia are addicted to sniffing glue. Especially the price makes it the most popular kind of drug. A hit of glue can be bought for as little as fifty cents. The children get the money they need by begging from tourists. Although sniffing glue is one of the largest problems in Cambodia today, the country still does not have any form of care for the addicts.

  • CAMBODIAN GLUE KIDS (2005)

  • CAMBODIAN GLUE KIDS (2005)

  • CAMBODIAN GLUE KIDS (2005)

  • CAMBODIAN GLUE KIDS (2005)

Phuoc Bui Huu

Phuoc Bui Huu

DEPARTURE (2005)

'I hope to earn more money if I graduate. Then I can help my family escape poverty.' These words, from the Vietnamese student Toan, are the basis for DEPARTURE (2005). According to Phuoc Bui Huu, they characterize the situation in the Vietnamese countryside, where one of the children in a family studying is the only chance for a better life. Toan, 22 years old, is in his second year at the academy for economics in Ho Chi Minh City. He spends most of his free time in front of the television in his room. He has no money to go out for entertainment. Phuoc Bui Huu photographed Toan on the campus and with his family in the countryside. In his way he wants to let us see that Toan, like so many Vietnamese students, 'is on his way to an uncertain future, with almost empty hands'.

Phuoc Bui Huu >>

  • DEPARTURE (2005)


    'I hope to earn more money if I graduate. Then I can help my family escape poverty.' These words, from the Vietnamese student Toan, are the basis for DEPARTURE (2005). According to Phuoc Bui Huu, they characterize the situation in the Vietnamese countryside, where one of the children in a family studying is the only chance for a better life. Toan, 22 years old, is in his second year at the academy for economics in Ho Chi Minh City. He spends most of his free time in front of the television in his room. He has no money to go out for entertainment. Phuoc Bui Huu photographed Toan on the campus and with his family in the countryside. In his way he wants to let us see that Toan, like so many Vietnamese students, 'is on his way to an uncertain future, with almost empty hands'.

  • DEPARTURE (2005)

  • DEPARTURE (2005)

  • DEPARTURE (2005)

  • DEPARTURE (2005)

Remissa Mak

Remissa Mak

WHEN THE WATER RISES... (2005)

'When the water rises, the fish eats the ant; when the water recedes, the ant eats the fish' (2005). According to Remissa Mak, this Khmer proverb, as old as it is popular, sums up the situation in Cambodia well. Eighty percent of the population is farmer. Anyone plagued by drought has an enormous problem. The proverb is also true in a symbolic sense. The part of the population for whom the circumstances are the most favorable is dominant in Cambodia. Previously that translated into war and oppression; now they control the division of work, food, power and medical care.

Remissa Mak >>

  • WHEN THE WATER RISES... (2005)

    'When the water rises, the fish eats the ant; when the water recedes, the ant eats the fish' (2005). According to Remissa Mak, this Khmer proverb, as old as it is popular, sums up the situation in Cambodia well. Eighty percent of the population is farmer. Anyone plagued by drought has an enormous problem. The proverb is also true in a symbolic sense. The part of the population for whom the circumstances are the most favorable is dominant in Cambodia. Previously that translated into war and oppression; now they control the division of work, food, power and medical care.

  • WHEN THE WATER RISES... (2005)

  • WHEN THE WATER RISES... (2005)

  • WHEN THE WATER RISES... (2005)

  • WHEN THE WATER RISES... (2005)

Anay Mann

Anay Mann

GENERATION IN TRANSITION (2000-2004)

As a result of economic reforms and increasing freedoms, India's cities are taking on a new shape. Traditional boundaries in the realm of religion, gender and identity are blurring, particularly among the fast-growing middle class. Anay Mann - himself from the middle class - recorded what these changes mean for young people in New Delhi and Mumbai, cities with populations equal to that of The Netherlands. There he found a generation that is searching for a new identity under confusing circumstances. For instance, their lifestyle is influenced just as much by Western media as it is by the traditionally focused Bollywood.

Anay Mann >>

  • GENERATION IN TRANSITION (2000-2004)

    As a result of economic reforms and increasing freedoms, India's cities are taking on a new shape. Traditional boundaries in the realm of religion, gender and identity are blurring, particularly among the fast-growing middle class. Anay Mann - himself from the middle class - recorded what these changes mean for young people in New Delhi and Mumbai, cities with populations equal to that of The Netherlands. There he found a generation that is searching for a new identity under confusing circumstances. For instance, their lifestyle is influenced just as much by Western media as it is by the traditionally focused Bollywood.

  • GENERATION IN TRANSITION (2000-2004)

  • GENERATION IN TRANSITION (2000-2004)

  • GENERATION IN TRANSITION (2000-2004)

  • GENERATION IN TRANSITION (2000-2004)

Palani Mohan

Palani Mohan

VANISHING GIANTS (2001-2006)

While the African elephant population is thriving, the Asian elephant is increasingly under pressure. The explosive growth in the human population, increasing land being claimed for agriculture and industry and the illegal felling of forests are robbing the Asian elephant of its original territory. In the whole of South and Southeast Asia there are only about 40,000 animals still surviving. Previously Thailand alone had over 100,000. Everywhere the elephant collides with man. His trails are blocked and he is taken captive to serve as a working animal or tourist attraction. In Myanmar elephants are killed for their tusks, in Cambodia they regularly step on landmines. Their situation is in shrill contrast to their status in South and Southeast Asia. The elephant can be found everywhere as an Asian logo: in woven carpets, on temple walls and as the figurehead for businesses.

Palani Mohan >>

  • VANISHING GIANTS (2001-2006)

    While the African elephant population is thriving, the Asian elephant is increasingly under pressure. The explosive growth in the human population, increasing land being claimed for agriculture and industry and the illegal felling of forests are robbing the Asian elephant of its original territory. In the whole of South and Southeast Asia there are only about 40,000 animals still surviving. Previously Thailand alone had over 100,000. Everywhere the elephant collides with man. His trails are blocked and he is taken captive to serve as a working animal or tourist attraction. In Myanmar elephants are killed for their tusks, in Cambodia they regularly step on landmines. Their situation is in shrill contrast to their status in South and Southeast Asia. The elephant can be found everywhere as an Asian logo: in woven carpets, on temple walls and as the figurehead for businesses.

  • VANISHING GIANTS (2001-2006)

  • VANISHING GIANTS (2001-2006)

  • VANISHING GIANTS (2001-2006)

  • VANISHING GIANTS (2001-2006)

Bui The Trung Nam

Bui The Trung Nam

IN THE SOUTH OF CHOLON

Ho Chi Minh City, with its six million residents the largest city in Vietnam, is burdened with history. Under its original name of Saigon, it came under French colonial administration in 1859. After the French were expelled, in 1950 Saigon became the capital of South Vietnam. In 1975 the North Vietnamese Army put an end to this, and its name was changed to Ho Chi Minh City, after the former Communist leader, though many residents still call the city Saigon. Bui The Trung Nam photographed Ho Chi Minh City in taut, symmetrical images. In that way he emphasizes the dissociation which manifests itself in the chaos in the city, which he sees as a consequence of the spreading conflict between its present and past.

Bui The Trung Nam >>

  • IN THE SOUTH OF CHOLON

    Ho Chi Minh City, with its six million residents the largest city in Vietnam, is burdened with history. Under its original name of Saigon, it came under French colonial administration in 1859. After the French were expelled, in 1950 Saigon became the capital of South Vietnam. In 1975 the North Vietnamese Army put an end to this, and its name was changed to Ho Chi Minh City, after the former Communist leader, though many residents still call the city Saigon. Bui The Trung Nam photographed Ho Chi Minh City in taut, symmetrical images. In that way he emphasizes the dissociation which manifests itself in the chaos in the city, which he sees as a consequence of the spreading conflict between its present and past.

  • IN THE SOUTH OF CHOLON

  • IN THE SOUTH OF CHOLON

  • IN THE SOUTH OF CHOLON

  • IN THE SOUTH OF CHOLON

Wawi Navarroza

Wawi Navarroza

POLYSACCHARIDE (2000)

POLYSACCHARIDE (2000) visualizes the inner conflict of a girl growing into adulthood in The Philippines. On the one side, the dollhouse stands for the rules and expectations of the family in which she is growing up. Both impeded the girl in her growth - the dollhouse literally. On the other side, it represents her fantasy world. Here the girl can flee the adult life, and her future has not yet been filled in. The series is a critical reflection on the way girls are raised in The Philippines. They are perhaps well cared for, suggests Wawi Navarroza, but they are not cherished as individuals.

Wawi Navarroza >>

  • POLYSACCHARIDE (2000)

    POLYSACCHARIDE (2000) visualizes the inner conflict of a girl growing into adulthood in The Philippines. On the one side, the dollhouse stands for the rules and expectations of the family in which she is growing up. Both impeded the girl in her growth - the dollhouse literally. On the other side, it represents her fantasy world. Here the girl can flee the adult life, and her future has not yet been filled in. The series is a critical reflection on the way girls are raised in The Philippines. They are perhaps well cared for, suggests Wawi Navarroza, but they are not cherished as individuals.

  • POLYSACCHARIDE (2000)

  • POLYSACCHARIDE (2000)

  • POLYSACCHARIDE (2000)

  • POLYSACCHARIDE (2000)

Swan Ti Ng

Swan Ti Ng

CATHOLICISM IN INDONESIA (2000-2005)

Although from a Confucian family, as a child Swan Ti Ng ended up in a Catholic school, after which baptism followed. Once an adult, Swan Ti Ng realized that her faith went no further than the obligatory church attendance. To investigate her religious identity, she decided to photograph CATHOLICISM IN INDONESIA (2000-2005). Officially the country recognizes five religions (Protestantism, Catholicism, Buddhism, Hinduism and Islam), and one's affiliation is noted in one's passport. But in practice, Swan It Ng discovered, the country exhibits a mishmash of traditions and beliefs. An adherent of one faith has no problem about using rituals from another.

Swan Ti Ng >>

  • CATHOLICISM IN INDONESIA (2000-2005)

    Although from a Confucian family, as a child Swan Ti Ng ended up in a Catholic school, after which baptism followed. Once an adult, Swan Ti Ng realized that her faith went no further than the obligatory church attendance. To investigate her religious identity, she decided to photograph CATHOLICISM IN INDONESIA (2000-2005). Officially the country recognizes five religions (Protestantism, Catholicism, Buddhism, Hinduism and Islam), and one's affiliation is noted in one's passport. But in practice, Swan It Ng discovered, the country exhibits a mishmash of traditions and beliefs. An adherent of one faith has no problem about using rituals from another.

  • CATHOLICISM IN INDONESIA (2000-2005)

  • CATHOLICISM IN INDONESIA (2000-2005)

  • CATHOLICISM IN INDONESIA (2000-2005)

  • CATHOLICISM IN INDONESIA (2000-2005)

Sudharak Olwe

Sudharak Olwe

IN SEARCH OF DIGNITY AND JUSTICE (2001)

Mumbai has about 30,000 people on its payroll who sweep the streets, pick up garbage and clean the sewers. Without exception they belong to the Dalits (literally, the 'downtrodden'), the lowest rung on the caste ladder. According to Indian standards they are reasonably paid, but through their position they struggle with poverty, abuse, despair and alcoholism. Sudharak Olwe photographed the lives of the cleaners of Mumbai, who have no prospect of a better life. With his photographs he hopes to move the authorities to improve their working conditions. He also appeals to the inhabitants of Mumbai to show appreciation for the heavy work that the Dalits perform daily to keep their city clean and livable.

Sudharak Olwe >>

  • IN SEARCH OF DIGNITY AND JUSTICE (2001)

    Mumbai has about 30,000 people on its payroll who sweep the streets, pick up garbage and clean the sewers. Without exception they belong to the Dalits (literally, the 'downtrodden'), the lowest rung on the caste ladder. According to Indian standards they are reasonably paid, but through their position they struggle with poverty, abuse, despair and alcoholism. Sudharak Olwe photographed the lives of the cleaners of Mumbai, who have no prospect of a better life. With his photographs he hopes to move the authorities to improve their working conditions. He also appeals to the inhabitants of Mumbai to show appreciation for the heavy work that the Dalits perform daily to keep their city clean and livable.

  • IN SEARCH OF DIGNITY AND JUSTICE (2001)

  • IN SEARCH OF DIGNITY AND JUSTICE (2001)

  • IN SEARCH OF DIGNITY AND JUSTICE (2001)

  • IN SEARCH OF DIGNITY AND JUSTICE (2001)

Sherman Ong

Sherman Ong

MONSOON (2005)

The word 'monsoon' comes from the Arab mausim, which stands for seasons and the prevailing wind directions connected with them. The monsoon determines the agenda for most of Southeast Asia, particularly in the agricultural and tourist sectors. The sudden, heavy rains make the region one of the most fertile in the world. At the same time, the absence of modern infrastructure means they lead to flooding and impede the mobility of those living in the region. Sherman Ong photographed MONSOON (2005) from a moving automobile. He left the window closed. The result is a poetic impression of the season that radically affects both the psyche and the landscape of Southeast Asia.

Sherman Ong >>

  • MONSOON (2005)

    The word 'monsoon' comes from the Arab mausim, which stands for seasons and the prevailing wind directions connected with them. The monsoon determines the agenda for most of Southeast Asia, particularly in the agricultural and tourist sectors. The sudden, heavy rains make the region one of the most fertile in the world. At the same time, the absence of modern infrastructure means they lead to flooding and impede the mobility of those living in the region. Sherman Ong photographed MONSOON (2005) from a moving automobile. He left the window closed. The result is a poetic impression of the season that radically affects both the psyche and the landscape of Southeast Asia.

  • MONSOON (2005)

  • MONSOON (2005)

  • MONSOON (2005)

  • MONSOON (2005)

Kaeowkao Pongpaiboon

Kaeowkao Pongpaiboon

STILL ALIVE (2003)

In the early 1990s Thailand built the Pak Mool Dam for generating electricity. The consequences for the fish stock were disastrous. Villages along the Mool River, dependent on fishing, rose up. After five years of futile protest, the villagers set up a tent camp near the main government buildings in Bangkok. It was the largest protest action in Thai history. Kaeowkao Pongpaiboon visited the camp, to his surprise a real village with cafes, restaurants and a hairdresser. He realized that it was a tragic copy of its residents' original environment. By now, the protest has ended. As a grudging compromise, the dam is opened for four months a year to permit the fish through.

Kaeowkao Pongpaiboon >>

  • STILL ALIVE (2003)

    In the early 1990s Thailand built the Pak Mool Dam for generating electricity. The consequences for the fish stock were disastrous. Villages along the Mool River, dependent on fishing, rose up. After five years of futile protest, the villagers set up a tent camp near the main government buildings in Bangkok. It was the largest protest action in Thai history. Kaeowkao Pongpaiboon visited the camp, to his surprise a real village with cafes, restaurants and a hairdresser. He realized that it was a tragic copy of its residents' original environment. By now, the protest has ended. As a grudging compromise, the dam is opened for four months a year to permit the fish through.

  • STILL ALIVE (2003)

  • STILL ALIVE (2003)

  • STILL ALIVE (2003)

  • STILL ALIVE (2003)

Pushpamala N

Pushpamala N

THE ETNOGRAPHIC SERIES (2000-2004)

In the colonial era many traditionally clad women from South India posed in the zenanas, photographic studios run by British women. Following the same tradition, Pushpamala N. had herself photographed by the British woman photographer Claire Arni. She based her poses on classic images from Indian film, photography and painting. Measuring instruments refer to the way in which the British colonialists photographed native women for ethnographic research. In this way the series plays with the notion of persons as museum objects. But more than anything else, THE ETNOGRAPHIC SERIES (2000-2004, from: Native Women of South India, Manners and Customs) is a commentary on the use of photography as an instrument for creating and confirming stereotypes. Pushpamala N. suggests that both the British and the Indians are guilty of this. The former were obsessed with classifying, the latter with forming a national identity.

Pushpamala N >>

  • THE ETNOGRAPHIC SERIES (2000-2004)

    In the colonial era many traditionally clad women from South India posed in the zenanas, photographic studios run by British women. Following the same tradition, Pushpamala N. had herself photographed by the British woman photographer Claire Arni. She based her poses on classic images from Indian film, photography and painting. Measuring instruments refer to the way in which the British colonialists photographed native women for ethnographic research. In this way the series plays with the notion of persons as museum objects. But more than anything else, THE ETNOGRAPHIC SERIES (2000-2004, from: Native Women of South India, Manners and Customs) is a commentary on the use of photography as an instrument for creating and confirming stereotypes. Pushpamala N. suggests that both the British and the Indians are guilty of this. The former were obsessed with classifying, the latter with forming a national identity.

  • THE ETNOGRAPHIC SERIES (2000-2004)

  • THE ETNOGRAPHIC SERIES (2000-2004)

  • THE ETNOGRAPHIC SERIES (2000-2004)

  • THE ETNOGRAPHIC SERIES (2000-2004)

Wahyudi Rahardjo

Wahyudi Rahardjo

SKY WORKER (2005)

It will be forty-three stories high, the newest skyscraper in Jakarta. The hardhats work at a height of 150 meters, where they have to deal with strong winds and blazing sun. This flagship of the new Jakarta is being built primarily by young men from the provinces. They are drawn to the capital city to earn money for their families. From this height SKY WORKER (2005) shows them looking down every day on the hectic city; they have to keep up with its pace. Safety instructions often go by the board. Even safety belts are frequently enough ignored. Although no one has died in the construction of this skyscraper yet, several workers fell to their death during the construction of the previous one.

Wahyudi Rahardjo >>

  • SKY WORKER (2005)

    It will be forty-three stories high, the newest skyscraper in Jakarta. The hardhats work at a height of 150 meters, where they have to deal with strong winds and blazing sun. This flagship of the new Jakarta is being built primarily by young men from the provinces. They are drawn to the capital city to earn money for their families. From this height SKY WORKER (2005) shows them looking down every day on the hectic city; they have to keep up with its pace. Safety instructions often go by the board. Even safety belts are frequently enough ignored. Although no one has died in the construction of this skyscraper yet, several workers fell to their death during the construction of the previous one.

  • SKY WORKER (2005)

  • SKY WORKER (2005)

  • SKY WORKER (2005)

  • SKY WORKER (2005)

Vandy Rattana

Vandy Rattana

SELF-PORTRAITS (2005-2006)

Vandy Rattana makes - as he himself puts it - non-traditional SELF-PORTRAITS (2005-2006). Although he does not appear in any of the photographs himself, he does provide a true-to-life image of his immediate environment. For instance, we see his mother and brother at his home, his girlfriend and neighbors in their homes, his colleagues in the office. The result is an authentic visual archive that provides a counterbalance to the clichéd image of Cambodia as the land of monks, temples and beggars. Moreover, much of the national archives were lost in the war. Visual material about previous generations is hardly available. That makes the recording of history something of the greatest importance, Vandy Rattana suggests. Certainly because Cambodia, despite all the rapid changes, still shows little interest in documenting its own society.

Vandy Rattana >>

  • SELF-PORTRAITS (2005-2006)

    Vandy Rattana makes - as he himself puts it - non-traditional SELF-PORTRAITS (2005-2006). Although he does not appear in any of the photographs himself, he does provide a true-to-life image of his immediate environment. For instance, we see his mother and brother at his home, his girlfriend and neighbors in their homes, his colleagues in the office. The result is an authentic visual archive that provides a counterbalance to the clichéd image of Cambodia as the land of monks, temples and beggars. Moreover, much of the national archives were lost in the war. Visual material about previous generations is hardly available. That makes the recording of history something of the greatest importance, Vandy Rattana suggests. Certainly because Cambodia, despite all the rapid changes, still shows little interest in documenting its own society.

  • SELF-PORTRAITS (2005-2006)

  • SELF-PORTRAITS (2005-2006)

  • SELF-PORTRAITS (2005-2006)

  • SELF-PORTRAITS (2005-2006)

Michael Shaowanasai

Michael Shaowanasai

SELF-PORTRAITS (2004-2005)

The Thai artist Michael Shaowanasai plays with preconceptions and role patterns in Asian culture - preferably in provocative ways. In doing so, he avoids the idealistic stereotypes, such as the handsome, subservient youth, in favor of the more banal variants. For instance, he presents himself as wife, ideological militant, war victim, sex partner and cover girl. These are roles that women in Asia are frequently assigned, but which also apply universally, according to Shaowanasai. By presenting himself as a woman the flamboyant homosexual artist also stands the traditional division of roles on its head in this work from 2004-2005.

Michael Shaowanasai >>

  • SELF-PORTRAITS (2004-2005)


    The Thai artist Michael Shaowanasai plays with preconceptions and role patterns in Asian culture - preferably in provocative ways. In doing so, he avoids the idealistic stereotypes, such as the handsome, subservient youth, in favor of the more banal variants. For instance, he presents himself as wife, ideological militant, war victim, sex partner and cover girl. These are roles that women in Asia are frequently assigned, but which also apply universally, according to Shaowanasai. By presenting himself as a woman the flamboyant homosexual artist also stands the traditional division of roles on its head in this work from 2004-2005.

  • SELF-PORTRAITS (2004-2005)

  • SELF-PORTRAITS (2004-2005)

  • SELF-PORTRAITS (2004-2005)

  • SELF-PORTRAITS (2004-2005)

Vannaphone Sitthirath

Vannaphone Sitthirath

GROWING UP IN THE MEKONG (2004)

In the Mekong basin, Thailand is the land of unlimited opportunity. The number of immigrants is enormous. Every day about 10,000 Cambodians cross the border with goods to sell legally - or with contraband. Many children are also traded along the border, who will end up in Bangkok as prostitutes, beggars or street vendors. Vannaphone Sitthirath produced the photo essay GROWING UP IN THE MEKONG (2004) on the children on the Thai border with Laos and Cambodia. They come from Myanmar, Laos and Cambodia, and are almost all victims of exploitation, drug addition and abuse. Some sell their blood to stay alive. Others dream of becoming a teacher or doctor, but only a handful will escape their poverty.

Vannaphone Sitthirath >>

  • GROWING UP IN THE MEKONG (2004)


    In the Mekong basin, Thailand is the land of unlimited opportunity. The number of immigrants is enormous. Every day about 10,000 Cambodians cross the border with goods to sell legally - or with contraband. Many children are also traded along the border, who will end up in Bangkok as prostitutes, beggars or street vendors. Vannaphone Sitthirath produced the photo essay GROWING UP IN THE MEKONG (2004) on the children on the Thai border with Laos and Cambodia. They come from Myanmar, Laos and Cambodia, and are almost all victims of exploitation, drug addition and abuse. Some sell their blood to stay alive. Others dream of becoming a teacher or doctor, but only a handful will escape their poverty.

  • GROWING UP IN THE MEKONG (2004)

  • GROWING UP IN THE MEKONG (2004)

  • GROWING UP IN THE MEKONG (2004)

  • GROWING UP IN THE MEKONG (2004)

Arief Kamaludin Rhaman

Arief Kamaludin Rhaman

MOHAMMED AND ME - DAILY LIFE WITHIN MUSLIM SOCIETIES

With 200 million Muslims, Indonesia is the world's largest Islamic country. Its Muslims represent many strands, which differ strongly from one another. For example, after September 11 fundamentalism grew rapidly, but so did concerns about radical Islam. Curator Alex Supartono asked three young Indonesians to photograph the Islamic society in which they live. The commission was a consciousness-raising process. Not only were the photographers witness to a continuing politicization of Islam, they were also impressed by the enormous wealth of Islamic currents in their society. Furthermore, the emphasis on their personal experience reveals - and revealed - the everyday character of Islam - both to the viewer, and to the photographers themselves.MOHAMMED AND ME is intended to grow into a worldwide project that will provide more insight into Islam and its effects. 'Mohammed is changing,' says Alex Supartono (b. 1972), 'and our world is quickly changing as a result.'

Arief Kamaludin Rhaman >>

  • MOHAMMED AND ME - DAILY LIFE WITHIN MUSLIM SOCIETIES

    With 200 million Muslims, Indonesia is the world's largest Islamic country. Its Muslims represent many strands, which differ strongly from one another. For example, after September 11 fundamentalism grew rapidly, but so did concerns about radical Islam. Curator Alex Supartono asked three young Indonesians to photograph the Islamic society in which they live. The commission was a consciousness-raising process. Not only were the photographers witness to a continuing politicization of Islam, they were also impressed by the enormous wealth of Islamic currents in their society. Furthermore, the emphasis on their personal experience reveals - and revealed - the everyday character of Islam - both to the viewer, and to the photographers themselves.

    MOHAMMED AND ME is intended to grow into a worldwide project that will provide more insight into Islam and its effects. 'Mohammed is changing,' says Alex Supartono (b. 1972), 'and our world is quickly changing as a result.'

  • MOHAMMED AND ME - DAILY LIFE WITHIN MUSLIM SOCIETIES

Paul Kadarisman

Paul Kadarisman

MOHAMMED AND ME - DAILY LIFE WITHIN MUSLIM SOCIETIES

With 200 million Muslims, Indonesia is the world's largest Islamic country. Its Muslims represent many strands, which differ strongly from one another. For example, after September 11 fundamentalism grew rapidly, but so did concerns about radical Islam. Curator Alex Supartono asked three young Indonesians to photograph the Islamic society in which they live. The commission was a consciousness-raising process. Not only were the photographers witness to a continuing politicization of Islam, they were also impressed by the enormous wealth of Islamic currents in their society. Furthermore, the emphasis on their personal experience reveals - and revealed - the everyday character of Islam - both to the viewer, and to the photographers themselves.MOHAMMED AND ME is intended to grow into a worldwide project that will provide more insight into Islam and its effects. 'Mohammed is changing,' says Alex Supartono (b. 1972), 'and our world is quickly changing as a result.'

Paul Kadarisman >>

  • MOHAMMED AND ME - DAILY LIFE WITHIN MUSLIM SOCIETIES

    With 200 million Muslims, Indonesia is the world's largest Islamic country. Its Muslims represent many strands, which differ strongly from one another. For example, after September 11 fundamentalism grew rapidly, but so did concerns about radical Islam. Curator Alex Supartono asked three young Indonesians to photograph the Islamic society in which they live. The commission was a consciousness-raising process. Not only were the photographers witness to a continuing politicization of Islam, they were also impressed by the enormous wealth of Islamic currents in their society. Furthermore, the emphasis on their personal experience reveals - and revealed - the everyday character of Islam - both to the viewer, and to the photographers themselves.

    MOHAMMED AND ME is intended to grow into a worldwide project that will provide more insight into Islam and its effects. 'Mohammed is changing,' says Alex Supartono (b. 1972), 'and our world is quickly changing as a result.'

  • MOHAMMED AND ME - DAILY LIFE WITHIN MUSLIM SOCIETIES

Mohammed Revaldi

Mohammed Revaldi

MOHAMMED AND ME - DAILY LIFE WITHIN MUSLIM SOCIETIES

With 200 million Muslims, Indonesia is the world's largest Islamic country. Its Muslims represent many strands, which differ strongly from one another. For example, after September 11 fundamentalism grew rapidly, but so did concerns about radical Islam. Curator Alex Supartono asked three young Indonesians to photograph the Islamic society in which they live. The commission was a consciousness-raising process. Not only were the photographers witness to a continuing politicization of Islam, they were also impressed by the enormous wealth of Islamic currents in their society. Furthermore, the emphasis on their personal experience reveals - and revealed - the everyday character of Islam - both to the viewer, and to the photographers themselves.MOHAMMED AND ME is intended to grow into a worldwide project that will provide more insight into Islam and its effects. 'Mohammed is changing,' says Alex Supartono (b. 1972), 'and our world is quickly changing as a result.'

Mohammed Revaldi >>

  • MOHAMMED AND ME - DAILY LIFE WITHIN MUSLIM SOCIETIES

    With 200 million Muslims, Indonesia is the world's largest Islamic country. Its Muslims represent many strands, which differ strongly from one another. For example, after September 11 fundamentalism grew rapidly, but so did concerns about radical Islam. Curator Alex Supartono asked three young Indonesians to photograph the Islamic society in which they live. The commission was a consciousness-raising process. Not only were the photographers witness to a continuing politicization of Islam, they were also impressed by the enormous wealth of Islamic currents in their society. Furthermore, the emphasis on their personal experience reveals - and revealed - the everyday character of Islam - both to the viewer, and to the photographers themselves.

    MOHAMMED AND ME is intended to grow into a worldwide project that will provide more insight into Islam and its effects. 'Mohammed is changing,' says Alex Supartono (b. 1972), 'and our world is quickly changing as a result.'

  • MOHAMMED AND ME - DAILY LIFE WITHIN MUSLIM SOCIETIES

Farhana Syeda

Farhana Syeda

DHAKA, A CITY OF MANY LAYERS (2004-2005)

'I had a love-hate relationship with Dhaka,' says Farhana Syeda about the capital of Bangladesh. 'But it was there that I learned everything I needed to know.' She lived there from 1989 to 2002, and returned in 2005. Suddenly she saw all sorts of new things, but literally and figuratively. For instance, the number of high-rise buildings had increased dramatically, just as had the number of slums. They were a lot less birds: to a great extent nature had been routed by advertising billboards. On the other hand, the flood of new residents had swollen. All were seeking something - work, studies, love - just as Farhana Syeda had in 1989. Her astonishment about Dhaka remains, she says. Every street corner still offers a new story. 'My quest to understand the city goes on.'

Farhana Syeda >>

  • DHAKA, A CITY OF MANY LAYERS (2004-2005)

    'I had a love-hate relationship with Dhaka,' says Farhana Syeda about the capital of Bangladesh. 'But it was there that I learned everything I needed to know.' She lived there from 1989 to 2002, and returned in 2005. Suddenly she saw all sorts of new things, but literally and figuratively. For instance, the number of high-rise buildings had increased dramatically, just as had the number of slums. They were a lot less birds: to a great extent nature had been routed by advertising billboards. On the other hand, the flood of new residents had swollen. All were seeking something - work, studies, love - just as Farhana Syeda had in 1989. Her astonishment about Dhaka remains, she says. Every street corner still offers a new story. 'My quest to understand the city goes on.'

  • DHAKA, A CITY OF MANY LAYERS (2004-2005)

  • DHAKA, A CITY OF MANY LAYERS (2004-2005)

  • DHAKA, A CITY OF MANY LAYERS (2004-2005)

  • DHAKA, A CITY OF MANY LAYERS (2004-2005)

Yee I-Lann

Yee I-Lann

SULU STORIES (2005)

In her youth, I-Lann Yee heard magical stories about the Sulu Sea, which lies between her native Malaysia and The Philippines. For instance, there is a dragon that lives along the coast, which likes to play with a pearl 'as large as a tennis ball'. Later she learned that the world's largest pearls were found in the Sulu Sea. I-Lann Yee began to dig further and stumbled across a selection of legends full of pirates, kidnappings, shipwrecks, opium and ghosts. She reworked elements from these stories into photographs that she made of the Sulu Sea, creating a visual archive which says much about the surrounding region. Because, as I-Lann Yee says, 'We do not feel Malaysian or Filipino. We feel Sulu.'

Yee I-Lann >>

  • SULU STORIES (2005)


    In her youth, I-Lann Yee heard magical stories about the Sulu Sea, which lies between her native Malaysia and The Philippines. For instance, there is a dragon that lives along the coast, which likes to play with a pearl 'as large as a tennis ball'. Later she learned that the world's largest pearls were found in the Sulu Sea. I-Lann Yee began to dig further and stumbled across a selection of legends full of pirates, kidnappings, shipwrecks, opium and ghosts. She reworked elements from these stories into photographs that she made of the Sulu Sea, creating a visual archive which says much about the surrounding region. Because, as I-Lann Yee says, 'We do not feel Malaysian or Filipino. We feel Sulu.'

  • SULU STORIES (2005)

  • SULU STORIES (2005)

  • SULU STORIES (2005)

  • SULU STORIES (2005)

Another Asia II

Jan Banning

Jan Banning

THE OFFICE (India/Indonesia, 2004-2006)

Bureaucracy is an everyday form of state power with which citizens are confronted everywhere. Jan Banning has done portraits of bureaucrats at all levels, from village clerks to governors. Although the bureaucrats pose, their desk is the real subject. Thát is the permanent expression of their status and power. The person behind it is interchangeable, during his working hours assuming the role of immigration officer or revenue agent. That is emphasized by the pose in which he is photographed: as an actor playing himself. THE OFFICE (India/Indonesia, 2004-2006) is a work in progress, eventually to include bureaucrats in ten countries. The series on Bihar, a state in the world's largest democracy, India, is completed; the series on Indonesia has just begun. The photographs are accompanied by interviews by Will Tinnemans.

Jan Banning >>

  • THE OFFICE (India/Indonesia, 2004-2006)

    Bureaucracy is an everyday form of state power with which citizens are confronted everywhere. Jan Banning has done portraits of bureaucrats at all levels, from village clerks to governors. Although the bureaucrats pose, their desk is the real subject. Thát is the permanent expression of their status and power. The person behind it is interchangeable, during his working hours assuming the role of immigration officer or revenue agent. That is emphasized by the pose in which he is photographed: as an actor playing himself. THE OFFICE (India/Indonesia, 2004-2006) is a work in progress, eventually to include bureaucrats in ten countries. The series on Bihar, a state in the world's largest democracy, India, is completed; the series on Indonesia has just begun. The photographs are accompanied by interviews by Will Tinnemans.

  • THE OFFICE (India/Indonesia, 2004-2006)

  • THE OFFICE (India/Indonesia, 2004-2006)

  • THE OFFICE (India/Indonesia, 2004-2006)

  • THE OFFICE (India/Indonesia, 2004-2006)

Federica Palmarin

Federica Palmarin

KAKAIBANG EBA (2004-2005)

KAKAIBANG EBA (2004-2005), or literally 'another sort of Eve', shows a number of the most famous transvestites of The Philippines. They have their own cabaret show, the Amazing Philippine Show, in which they tempt and provoke the public with their feminine mannerisms and enticing self-made costumes. And with success. The two-day performances are invariable sold out. The actors also live as women outside of the performance. Although The Philippines is a strongly Catholic country, the society has absolutely no problem with these flamboyant homosexuals. There is even considerable respect for their extravagant lifestyle, full of feather boas, whisky and lipstick.

Federica Palmarin >>

  • KAKAIBANG EBA (2004-2005)

    KAKAIBANG EBA (2004-2005), or literally 'another sort of Eve', shows a number of the most famous transvestites of The Philippines. They have their own cabaret show, the Amazing Philippine Show, in which they tempt and provoke the public with their feminine mannerisms and enticing self-made costumes. And with success. The two-day performances are invariable sold out. The actors also live as women outside of the performance. Although The Philippines is a strongly Catholic country, the society has absolutely no problem with these flamboyant homosexuals. There is even considerable respect for their extravagant lifestyle, full of feather boas, whisky and lipstick.

  • KAKAIBANG EBA (2004-2005)

  • KAKAIBANG EBA (2004-2005)

  • KAKAIBANG EBA (2004-2005)

  • KAKAIBANG EBA (2004-2005)

Philip Blenkinsop

Philip Blenkinsop

NEPAL (2001-2006)

In 2001 Philip Blenkinsop was one of the first Westerners to photograph the Maoist guerrilla movement in NEPAL (2001-2006). After that he returned to the country several times He always encountered large-scale protests against the authoritarian head of state, King Gyanendra. In April, 2006, this popular rebellion led to his fall. This was preceded by weeks of violence, since the King refused to recognize the parliament. With the restoration of democracy, the Maoists too received a place in the political spectrum. The negotiations over their disarming however have been difficult. Traces of the years of civil war and state terror are also still visible.

Philip Blenkinsop >>

  • NEPAL (2001-2006)

    In 2001 Philip Blenkinsop was one of the first Westerners to photograph the Maoist guerrilla movement in NEPAL (2001-2006). After that he returned to the country several times He always encountered large-scale protests against the authoritarian head of state, King Gyanendra. In April, 2006, this popular rebellion led to his fall. This was preceded by weeks of violence, since the King refused to recognize the parliament. With the restoration of democracy, the Maoists too received a place in the political spectrum. The negotiations over their disarming however have been difficult. Traces of the years of civil war and state terror are also still visible.

  • NEPAL (2001-2006)

  • NEPAL (2001-2006)

  • NEPAL (2001-2006)

  • NEPAL (2001-2006)

Henk Braam

Henk Braam

HOLY RIVERS OF INDIA (2000-2006)

Henk Braam went to India for the first time twenty years ago. Initially he understood little of this land, where cows, trees, mountains and even rats are venerated. Gradually his incomprehension became fascination. In India nature is seen as a religious miracle. For instance, for Hindus the Ganges is equal to God; every drop is holy and full of enchantment. At dawn millions of people go to bathe in the river at the same time in order to honor the alliance between the water and the sun, for them the guarantee of the rebirth of life on earth. This ancient ritual takes place in the midst of modern harbors, factories and crematoria. Henk Braam photographed life on and around the Ganges and other HOLY RIVERS OF INDIA (2000-2006), places that preeminently illustrate the many contradictions of the country.

Henk Braam >>

  • HOLY RIVERS OF INDIA (2000-2006)

    Henk Braam went to India for the first time twenty years ago. Initially he understood little of this land, where cows, trees, mountains and even rats are venerated. Gradually his incomprehension became fascination. In India nature is seen as a religious miracle. For instance, for Hindus the Ganges is equal to God; every drop is holy and full of enchantment. At dawn millions of people go to bathe in the river at the same time in order to honor the alliance between the water and the sun, for them the guarantee of the rebirth of life on earth. This ancient ritual takes place in the midst of modern harbors, factories and crematoria. Henk Braam photographed life on and around the Ganges and other HOLY RIVERS OF INDIA (2000-2006), places that preeminently illustrate the many contradictions of the country.

  • HOLY RIVERS OF INDIA (2000-2006)

  • HOLY RIVERS OF INDIA (2000-2006)

  • HOLY RIVERS OF INDIA (2000-2006)

  • HOLY RIVERS OF INDIA (2000-2006)

Howard Henry Chen

Howard Henry Chen

MULTIPLE ENTRY VIA (2004-2006)

The American immigrant Howard Henry Chen regularly visits his family in Vietnam. Together they explore the country, that presently attracts not only tourists, backpackers and Vietnam veterans, but also the Vietnamese themselves. Globalization has created a middle class there who has enough money to travel and visit amusement parks. This kitschy tourist industry, often inspired by the exotic Vietnamese culture, stands out sharply from the olive drab of the many war memorials that the country still counts, popular primarily with the foreign tourists. This leads Howard Henry Chen in MULTIPLE ENTRY VIA (2004-2006) to the conclusion that Vietnam is still a Western cliché: it presents itself as a battlefield, or as an oriental fantasy.

Howard Henry Chen >>

  • MULTIPLE ENTRY VIA (2004-2006)


    The American immigrant Howard Henry Chen regularly visits his family in Vietnam. Together they explore the country, that presently attracts not only tourists, backpackers and Vietnam veterans, but also the Vietnamese themselves. Globalization has created a middle class there who has enough money to travel and visit amusement parks. This kitschy tourist industry, often inspired by the exotic Vietnamese culture, stands out sharply from the olive drab of the many war memorials that the country still counts, popular primarily with the foreign tourists. This leads Howard Henry Chen in MULTIPLE ENTRY VIA (2004-2006) to the conclusion that Vietnam is still a Western cliché: it presents itself as a battlefield, or as an oriental fantasy.

  • MULTIPLE ENTRY VIA (2004-2006)

  • MULTIPLE ENTRY VIA (2004-2006)

  • MULTIPLE ENTRY VIA (2004-2006)

  • MULTIPLE ENTRY VIA (2004-2006)

Binh Danh

Binh Danh

REMEMBRANCE (2004-2005)

In Vietnam the landscape still bears traces of the Vietnam War. In REMEMBRANCE (2004-2005) Binh Danh brings this history to the surface with a unique procedure he conceived himself. He literally prints photos of the war on the undergrowth of the former battlefields. The method is derived from the natural process of photosynthesis. Together with the negative, the leaves - still alive - are pressed between two glass plates, then left exposed to the sun for several weeks. These fragile 'chlorophyll prints' are then encased in a block of resin, preserving the memories that are becoming increasingly vague.

Binh Danh >>

  • REMEMBRANCE (2004-2005)

    In Vietnam the landscape still bears traces of the Vietnam War. In REMEMBRANCE (2004-2005) Binh Danh brings this history to the surface with a unique procedure he conceived himself. He literally prints photos of the war on the undergrowth of the former battlefields. The method is derived from the natural process of photosynthesis. Together with the negative, the leaves - still alive - are pressed between two glass plates, then left exposed to the sun for several weeks. These fragile 'chlorophyll prints' are then encased in a block of resin, preserving the memories that are becoming increasingly vague.

  • REMEMBRANCE (2004-2005)

  • REMEMBRANCE (2004-2005)

  • REMEMBRANCE (2004-2005)

  • REMEMBRANCE (2004-2005)

James Whitlow Delano

James Whitlow Delano

DEATH THROES OF A GREAT RAINFOREST (1992-2006)

The rainforest of Borneo is one of the oldest in the world. Previously it covered the whole of Borneo and parts of western Indonesia, reaching as far as The Philippines. Today large parts have disappeared due to commercial logging. The very existence of many impoverished native tribes is threatened by this. Some have begun armed resistance, others turn against the migrants who, likewise in search of a better life, have arrived to work the land as it is cleared. James Whitlow Delano documented the exploitation of the forest and the consequences that has for the original inhabitants. Tellingly, he entitled his photo essay DEATH THROES OF A GREAT RAINFOREST (1992-2006).

James Whitlow Delano >>

  • DEATH THROES OF A GREAT RAINFOREST (1992-2006)

    The rainforest of Borneo is one of the oldest in the world. Previously it covered the whole of Borneo and parts of western Indonesia, reaching as far as The Philippines. Today large parts have disappeared due to commercial logging. The very existence of many impoverished native tribes is threatened by this. Some have begun armed resistance, others turn against the migrants who, likewise in search of a better life, have arrived to work the land as it is cleared. James Whitlow Delano documented the exploitation of the forest and the consequences that has for the original inhabitants. Tellingly, he entitled his photo essay DEATH THROES OF A GREAT RAINFOREST (1992-2006).

  • DEATH THROES OF A GREAT RAINFOREST (1992-2006)

  • DEATH THROES OF A GREAT RAINFOREST (1992-2006)

  • DEATH THROES OF A GREAT RAINFOREST (1992-2006)

  • DEATH THROES OF A GREAT RAINFOREST (1992-2006)

Wijnanda Deroo

Wijnanda Deroo

INDONESIA (2005)

Wijnanda Deroo usually photographs interiors. She finds them everywhere: in hotels, mobile homes, synagogues and cafes. She records these places in a specific manner: intelligibly and in detail, but without people. Yet the images provide lots of information about the users. The design, colors and wear suggest a function, age and history. Because of the absence of people, these traces of life provoke an air of mystery, sometimes even menace. This comes through all the more clearly in the interiors that Deroo photographed on Sumatra, Java and Bali, places that have been associated with mystical forces for ages. The architecture in INDONESIA (2005) shows traces of Dutch colonialism, but likewise is redolent of Indonesian culture.

Wijnanda Deroo >>

  • INDONESIA (2005)

    Wijnanda Deroo usually photographs interiors. She finds them everywhere: in hotels, mobile homes, synagogues and cafes. She records these places in a specific manner: intelligibly and in detail, but without people. Yet the images provide lots of information about the users. The design, colors and wear suggest a function, age and history. Because of the absence of people, these traces of life provoke an air of mystery, sometimes even menace. This comes through all the more clearly in the interiors that Deroo photographed on Sumatra, Java and Bali, places that have been associated with mystical forces for ages. The architecture in INDONESIA (2005) shows traces of Dutch colonialism, but likewise is redolent of Indonesian culture.

  • INDONESIA (2005)

  • INDONESIA (2005)

  • INDONESIA (2005)

  • INDONESIA (2005)

Stephen Dupont

Stephen Dupont

RASKOLS (2004)

According to the financial paper The Economist, Port Moresby, capital of Papua New Guinea, is the world's least livable city. Two-thirds of the residents live in slums; seventy percent are unemployed. The city is a spawning ground for RASKOLS (2004), street gangs that rob and plunder. The proceeds go to their own community. Stephen Dupont photographed one of the oldest gangs, the Kips Kaboni or Red Devils. The members themselves decided how they would pose, often as tough guys. In this way Dupont emphasizes the dignity of the raskols. In his eyes, more than anything else the gang members are victims of the crisis in their country, and Robin Hood figures of a sort.

Stephen Dupont >>

  • RASKOLS (2004)

    According to the financial paper The Economist, Port Moresby, capital of Papua New Guinea, is the world's least livable city. Two-thirds of the residents live in slums; seventy percent are unemployed. The city is a spawning ground for RASKOLS (2004), street gangs that rob and plunder. The proceeds go to their own community. Stephen Dupont photographed one of the oldest gangs, the Kips Kaboni or Red Devils. The members themselves decided how they would pose, often as tough guys. In this way Dupont emphasizes the dignity of the raskols. In his eyes, more than anything else the gang members are victims of the crisis in their country, and Robin Hood figures of a sort.

  • RASKOLS (2004)

  • RASKOLS (2004)

  • RASKOLS (2004)

  • RASKOLS (2004)

Khiang Han Hei

Khiang Han Hei

BOMBSHELLS TO COWBELLS (1997-2002)

Between 1964 and 1973 the American Air Force dropped two million tons of bombs on the Ho Chi Minh Trail, an important supply line for the North Vietnamese army through Laos, Cambodia and Vietnam. The jungle is still sown with bomb fragments, and unexploded bombs still claim victims among those who try to recover them for scrap. For the Montagnards, an isolated mountain tribe that lives along the former Ho Chi Minh Trail, the bombardment came as a complete surprise at the time. Today the remnants of the war are interwoven with their everyday life. The war material that once threatened their lives now is used as boats, flowerpots, tools or building material, as seen in BOMBSHELLS TO COWBELLS (1997-2002).

Khiang Han Hei >>

  • BOMBSHELLS TO COWBELLS (1997-2002)

    Between 1964 and 1973 the American Air Force dropped two million tons of bombs on the Ho Chi Minh Trail, an important supply line for the North Vietnamese army through Laos, Cambodia and Vietnam. The jungle is still sown with bomb fragments, and unexploded bombs still claim victims among those who try to recover them for scrap. For the Montagnards, an isolated mountain tribe that lives along the former Ho Chi Minh Trail, the bombardment came as a complete surprise at the time. Today the remnants of the war are interwoven with their everyday life. The war material that once threatened their lives now is used as boats, flowerpots, tools or building material, as seen in BOMBSHELLS TO COWBELLS (1997-2002).

  • BOMBSHELLS TO COWBELLS (1997-2002)

  • BOMBSHELLS TO COWBELLS (1997-2002)

  • BOMBSHELLS TO COWBELLS (1997-2002)

  • BOMBSHELLS TO COWBELLS (1997-2002)

Claudio Hils

Claudio Hils

DREAM CITY (2001)

Urbanization is proceeding at a rapid pace all over the world. Three-quarters of all children being born today are born in cities. Particularly in Africa, Latin America and Asia cities are swelling to unmanageable proportions. Historic urban elements fall prey to commercial initiatives, and in the absence of any master plan a potpourri of architecture and infrastructure, old and new, arises. Claudio Hils photographed the Thai capital, Bangkok, which is one of the fastest growing cities in the world. He focused in particularly on details, since the city has become too large to be captured in general photos now. Moreover, it is precisely these ordinary elements that define the real character of the city.

Claudio Hils >>

  • DREAM CITY (2001)

    Urbanization is proceeding at a rapid pace all over the world. Three-quarters of all children being born today are born in cities. Particularly in Africa, Latin America and Asia cities are swelling to unmanageable proportions. Historic urban elements fall prey to commercial initiatives, and in the absence of any master plan a potpourri of architecture and infrastructure, old and new, arises. Claudio Hils photographed the Thai capital, Bangkok, which is one of the fastest growing cities in the world. He focused in particularly on details, since the city has become too large to be captured in general photos now. Moreover, it is precisely these ordinary elements that define the real character of the city.

  • DREAM CITY (2001)

  • DREAM CITY (2001)

  • DREAM CITY (2001)

  • DREAM CITY (2001)

Jurgen Huiskes

Jurgen Huiskes

ANGKOR WAT (2004)

For centuries Angkor Wat was a legend. The immense temples must have been built by gods or giants. In 1860 the city was discovered in the jungles of Cambodia. Archaeologists slowly unraveled their history. Angkor Wat dated from the 9th century and was the capital of the earlier Khmer Empire. During the bloody regime of the Khmer Rouge, from the late 1960s, the temples served as a military hideout. In 1998 the political climate was stable enough to open Cambodia's national borders again. That made Angkor Wat one of the most important tourist attractions in Southeast Asia. The city draws busloads of tourists every day. Coming from all parts of the world, ANGKOR WAT (2004) shows how they are a tourist attraction in themselves.

Jurgen Huiskes >>

  • ANGKOR WAT (2004)

    For centuries Angkor Wat was a legend. The immense temples must have been built by gods or giants. In 1860 the city was discovered in the jungles of Cambodia. Archaeologists slowly unraveled their history. Angkor Wat dated from the 9th century and was the capital of the earlier Khmer Empire. During the bloody regime of the Khmer Rouge, from the late 1960s, the temples served as a military hideout. In 1998 the political climate was stable enough to open Cambodia's national borders again. That made Angkor Wat one of the most important tourist attractions in Southeast Asia. The city draws busloads of tourists every day. Coming from all parts of the world, ANGKOR WAT (2004) shows how they are a tourist attraction in themselves.

  • ANGKOR WAT (2004)

  • ANGKOR WAT (2004)

  • ANGKOR WAT (2004)

  • ANGKOR WAT (2004)

Stéphane Janin

Stéphane Janin

PHNOM PENH CHIC (2005-2006)

Anyone with enough money can simply ignore poverty, Stéphane Janin suggests in PHNOM PENH CHIC (2005-2006). He moves among the 'happy few' of Cambodia, who are chiefly to be found in the capital city, Phnom Penh. Seeing their posh parties and Western lifestyle, one might be forgiven for thinking that this is a country that has no need of the 500 million dollars in development aid it receives annually. The reality is different. Half the Cambodian population lives on less than two dollars a day. In the countryside many schools and homes still lack electricity, and medical help is several days walk away. But those who live in the better neighborhoods of the city can easily shut their eyes to that.

Stéphane Janin >>

  • PHNOM PENH CHIC (2005-2006)

    Anyone with enough money can simply ignore poverty, Stéphane Janin suggests in PHNOM PENH CHIC (2005-2006). He moves among the 'happy few' of Cambodia, who are chiefly to be found in the capital city, Phnom Penh. Seeing their posh parties and Western lifestyle, one might be forgiven for thinking that this is a country that has no need of the 500 million dollars in development aid it receives annually. The reality is different. Half the Cambodian population lives on less than two dollars a day. In the countryside many schools and homes still lack electricity, and medical help is several days walk away. But those who live in the better neighborhoods of the city can easily shut their eyes to that.

  • PHNOM PENH CHIC (2005-2006)

  • PHNOM PENH CHIC (2005-2006)

  • PHNOM PENH CHIC (2005-2006)

  • PHNOM PENH CHIC (2005-2006)

Ed Kashi

Ed Kashi

MOVING BOTH WAYS (1998, 2004)

The modernization of Pakistan is coupled with great social and political unrest. Yet one can see evidence of a cultural explosion that is going almost unnoticed by the rest of the world. Encouraged by new, independent television stations with contemporary fashion and music, young people have created their own art and media. These are at odds with Pakistan's strict Islamic traditions. Ed Kashi in MOVING BOTH WAYS (1998, 2004) photographed the sharp contrasts between the worldly, well-educated generation and their arch-conservative, illiterate predecessors. Such contrasts are not limited only to the cities, but also exist in the villages in the countryside.

Ed Kashi >>

  • MOVING BOTH WAYS (1998, 2004)


    The modernization of Pakistan is coupled with great social and political unrest. Yet one can see evidence of a cultural explosion that is going almost unnoticed by the rest of the world. Encouraged by new, independent television stations with contemporary fashion and music, young people have created their own art and media. These are at odds with Pakistan's strict Islamic traditions. Ed Kashi in MOVING BOTH WAYS (1998, 2004) photographed the sharp contrasts between the worldly, well-educated generation and their arch-conservative, illiterate predecessors. Such contrasts are not limited only to the cities, but also exist in the villages in the countryside.

  • MOVING BOTH WAYS (1998, 2004)

  • MOVING BOTH WAYS (1998, 2004)

  • MOVING BOTH WAYS (1998, 2004)

  • MOVING BOTH WAYS (1998, 2004)

Kalpesh Lathigra

Kalpesh Lathigra

BRIDES OF KRISHNA (2003-2005)

Despite social reforms, the position of widows in India is abominable. Often they are cast out by their family, who regard them as guilty of their husband's death. Moreover, in some Indian states they are expected to shave their heads, dress like a ghost in a white sari, and live out their lives in poverty. Often they travel to the holy cities, which as seen as the links between heaven and earth. Dying there offers a chance to break through the cycle of reincarnation and achieve moksha, spiritual liberation. For instance, there are more than 3000 widows in the holy city of Vrindvan. They live packed into small rooms, without water or electricity. They try to make a living singing daily in temples devoted to the Hindu god Krishna, often for eight hours at a time. The temples receive large gifts, the windows only a pittance, so that the BRIDES OF KRISHNA (2003-2005) have to beg to supplement their income.

Kalpesh Lathigra >>

  • BRIDES OF KRISHNA (2003-2005)

    Despite social reforms, the position of widows in India is abominable. Often they are cast out by their family, who regard them as guilty of their husband's death. Moreover, in some Indian states they are expected to shave their heads, dress like a ghost in a white sari, and live out their lives in poverty. Often they travel to the holy cities, which as seen as the links between heaven and earth. Dying there offers a chance to break through the cycle of reincarnation and achieve moksha, spiritual liberation. For instance, there are more than 3000 widows in the holy city of Vrindvan. They live packed into small rooms, without water or electricity. They try to make a living singing daily in temples devoted to the Hindu god Krishna, often for eight hours at a time. The temples receive large gifts, the windows only a pittance, so that the BRIDES OF KRISHNA (2003-2005) have to beg to supplement their income.

  • BRIDES OF KRISHNA (2003-2005)

  • BRIDES OF KRISHNA (2003-2005)

  • BRIDES OF KRISHNA (2003-2005)

  • BRIDES OF KRISHNA (2003-2005)

Tri Huu Luu

Tri Huu Luu

UNTITLED (1996-2006)

Tri Huu Luu was born in Saigon in 1972. At the age of six his mother sent him to a Buddhist monastery. When she died ten years later, Luu was old enough to fight in the war between Vietnam and Cambodia. To avoid military conscription, he fled to the United States. There he studied photography. Unable to speak adequate English, in this way he could communicate in pictures. To forget his past, he threw himself into American culture. Seven years later he returned to Vietnam. He found great satisfaction in the simple monastic life in which he had once participated. Once again, he communicated through his camera. His pictures of temples, monks and nature in the South of Asia (Vietnam/Laos/Sri Lanka/Tibet/Myanmar, 1996-2006) represent the spirituality that he felt as soon as he again set foot on Vietnamese soil.

Tri Huu Luu >>

  • UNTITLED (1996-2006)

    Tri Huu Luu was born in Saigon in 1972. At the age of six his mother sent him to a Buddhist monastery. When she died ten years later, Luu was old enough to fight in the war between Vietnam and Cambodia. To avoid military conscription, he fled to the United States. There he studied photography. Unable to speak adequate English, in this way he could communicate in pictures. To forget his past, he threw himself into American culture. Seven years later he returned to Vietnam. He found great satisfaction in the simple monastic life in which he had once participated. Once again, he communicated through his camera. His pictures of temples, monks and nature in the South of Asia (Vietnam/Laos/Sri Lanka/Tibet/Myanmar, 1996-2006) represent the spirituality that he felt as soon as he again set foot on Vietnamese soil.

  • UNTITLED (1996-2006)

  • UNTITLED (1996-2006)

  • UNTITLED (1996-2006)

  • UNTITLED (1996-2006)

Annu Palakunnathu Matthew

Annu Palakunnathu Matthew

BOLLYWOOD SATIRIZED (1999-2000)

Bollywood, the film industry of Mumbai, produces more films every year than Hollywood. The accompanying film posters often glorify the traditional relation between the sexes. Women are depicted as seductive beings, men as heroes who are able to conquer them. Annu Palakunnathu Matthew has recast some of these classical depictions into a critical commentary. With the aid of digital techniques she has manipulated the posters, and added portrait photographs of herself to them. In this way she stands the existing relations on their head, and plays in BOLLYWOOD SATIRIZED (1999-2000) with the social expectations that she herself grew up with as a girl in India.

Annu Palakunnathu Matthew >>

  • BOLLYWOOD SATIRIZED (1999-2000)


    Bollywood, the film industry of Mumbai, produces more films every year than Hollywood. The accompanying film posters often glorify the traditional relation between the sexes. Women are depicted as seductive beings, men as heroes who are able to conquer them. Annu Palakunnathu Matthew has recast some of these classical depictions into a critical commentary. With the aid of digital techniques she has manipulated the posters, and added portrait photographs of herself to them. In this way she stands the existing relations on their head, and plays in BOLLYWOOD SATIRIZED (1999-2000) with the social expectations that she herself grew up with as a girl in India.

  • BOLLYWOOD SATIRIZED (1999-2000)

  • BOLLYWOOD SATIRIZED (1999-2000)

  • BOLLYWOOD SATIRIZED (1999-2000)

  • BOLLYWOOD SATIRIZED (1999-2000)

Dominique Mérigard

Dominique Mérigard

TÉMOIN S21 (1994-1995)

In 1994 Dominique Mérigard visited the infamous S21 in the Cambodian capital, Phnom Penh. In this former elementary school almost 17,000 Cambodians were imprisoned, tortured and murdered. The perpetrators, Pol Pot's Khmer Rouge, photographed every victim before his or her execution. Bewildered, Mérigard began to photograph the building for S21 (1994-1995). Aesthetics could not be allowed to play any role. The barbed wire, the possessions left behind, the photographs of the executed: everything had to be documented as true-to-life as possible. After that, Mérigard felt an irrepressible urge to do portraits of the residents of Phnom Penh. He photographed young and old as evidence of new life, but in each face also saw the portrait of one of their executed countrymen.

Dominique Mérigard >>

  • TÉMOIN S21 (1994-1995)

    In 1994 Dominique Mérigard visited the infamous S21 in the Cambodian capital, Phnom Penh. In this former elementary school almost 17,000 Cambodians were imprisoned, tortured and murdered. The perpetrators, Pol Pot's Khmer Rouge, photographed every victim before his or her execution. Bewildered, Mérigard began to photograph the building for S21 (1994-1995). Aesthetics could not be allowed to play any role. The barbed wire, the possessions left behind, the photographs of the executed: everything had to be documented as true-to-life as possible. After that, Mérigard felt an irrepressible urge to do portraits of the residents of Phnom Penh. He photographed young and old as evidence of new life, but in each face also saw the portrait of one of their executed countrymen.

  • TÉMOIN S21 (1994-1995)

  • TÉMOIN S21 (1994-1995)

  • TÉMOIN S21 (1994-1995)

  • TÉMOIN S21 (1994-1995)

Boris Missirkov

Boris Missirkov

BHUTANESE FASHION (2002)

Right to the present day the residents of Bhutan dress according to strict rules which are propagated by the government. Bureaucrats are required to work in the traditional clothing, the gho for men and a kira for women. Until recently, citizens who dared to go out on the street dressed differently received fines. Presently Western clothing is increasing becoming available in Bhutan. As a result, life on the streets is beginning to look different. Boris Missirkov photographed a number of random clients at a photo studio in the Bhutanese capital of Thimpu, in front of the backdrops present there. BHUTANESE FASHION (2002) shows us the latest fashion in Bhutan, which mixes traditional and Western dress codes.

Boris Missirkov >>

  • BHUTANESE FASHION (2002)

    Right to the present day the residents of Bhutan dress according to strict rules which are propagated by the government. Bureaucrats are required to work in the traditional clothing, the gho for men and a kira for women. Until recently, citizens who dared to go out on the street dressed differently received fines. Presently Western clothing is increasing becoming available in Bhutan. As a result, life on the streets is beginning to look different. Boris Missirkov photographed a number of random clients at a photo studio in the Bhutanese capital of Thimpu, in front of the backdrops present there. BHUTANESE FASHION (2002) shows us the latest fashion in Bhutan, which mixes traditional and Western dress codes.

  • BHUTANESE FASHION (2002)

  • BHUTANESE FASHION (2002)

  • BHUTANESE FASHION (2002)

  • BHUTANESE FASHION (2002)

Fernando Moleres

Fernando Moleres

WOMEN IN THE TEXTILE INDUSTRY (2004)

In the 1980s there were 63 Levi Strauss factories in the United States. The last one recently closed its doors. With the globalization of the economy, the clothing industry has almost entirely moved to Asia. There clothing can be produced for a fifth of the previous cost. That makes the future of the Western clothing industry uncertain. It is estimated that in the next decade half the remaining clothing factories in Europe and the United States will close down. In WOMEN IN THE TEXTILE INDUSTRY (2004) Fernando Moleres photographed the clothing industry in several Asian countries, including Bangladesh and Sri Lanka. The factories are primarily populated by women, who work under miserable conditions.

Fernando Moleres >>

  • WOMEN IN THE TEXTILE INDUSTRY (2004)

    In the 1980s there were 63 Levi Strauss factories in the United States. The last one recently closed its doors. With the globalization of the economy, the clothing industry has almost entirely moved to Asia. There clothing can be produced for a fifth of the previous cost. That makes the future of the Western clothing industry uncertain. It is estimated that in the next decade half the remaining clothing factories in Europe and the United States will close down. In WOMEN IN THE TEXTILE INDUSTRY (2004) Fernando Moleres photographed the clothing industry in several Asian countries, including Bangladesh and Sri Lanka. The factories are primarily populated by women, who work under miserable conditions.

  • WOMEN IN THE TEXTILE INDUSTRY (2004)

  • WOMEN IN THE TEXTILE INDUSTRY (2004)

  • WOMEN IN THE TEXTILE INDUSTRY (2004)

  • WOMEN IN THE TEXTILE INDUSTRY (2004)

Nick Nostitz

Nick Nostitz

BANGKOK TWILIGHT (1993-2006)

For five years Nick Nostitz traveled around Asia. Among the places he fetched up as a backpacker was Bangkok. The Thai capital fascinated him so much that he made it his base of operations for his work as a photojournalist in Asia. But his passion is documenting the city's nightlife. He sees it as a subculture 'with a morality and ethic that differs essentially from that in everyday life'. For BANGKOK TWILIGHT (1993-2006) he turned his camera on the seamy side of the city, full of sex, drugs and crime. Drug wars have claimed thousands of lives, and the police pay no attention to the law. Nevertheless, Thailand is still universally regarded as the 'Land of Smiles'.

Nick Nostitz >>

  • BANGKOK TWILIGHT (1993-2006)

    For five years Nick Nostitz traveled around Asia. Among the places he fetched up as a backpacker was Bangkok. The Thai capital fascinated him so much that he made it his base of operations for his work as a photojournalist in Asia. But his passion is documenting the city's nightlife. He sees it as a subculture 'with a morality and ethic that differs essentially from that in everyday life'. For BANGKOK TWILIGHT (1993-2006) he turned his camera on the seamy side of the city, full of sex, drugs and crime. Drug wars have claimed thousands of lives, and the police pay no attention to the law. Nevertheless, Thailand is still universally regarded as the 'Land of Smiles'.

  • BANGKOK TWILIGHT (1993-2006)

  • BANGKOK TWILIGHT (1993-2006)

  • BANGKOK TWILIGHT (1993-2006)

  • BANGKOK TWILIGHT (1993-2006)

Nicolas Pascarel

Nicolas Pascarel

BLUE CORRIDOR (2005)

Yesterday and today blend together in Ho Chi Minh City, formerly Saigon. Vendors and managers share the sidewalks, and the sound of gongs in Buddhist temples mixes with scraps of music from chic cafes. Wandering through the city, Nicolas Pascarel happened on an intriguing building which appeared to be enveloped in a mysterious blue light. Once inside he found a jungle of concrete and peeling paint. There was no clear separation between the shops in the building and the dwellings. People walked around in a daze, as if they saw resignation as a survival strategy. Even Pascarel seemed to have landed in a hybrid world: a blue-painted corridor in whose dim light the ghosts of old Saigon encounter the high hopes of modern Ho Chi Minh City.

Nicolas Pascarel >>

  • BLUE CORRIDOR (2005)

    Yesterday and today blend together in Ho Chi Minh City, formerly Saigon. Vendors and managers share the sidewalks, and the sound of gongs in Buddhist temples mixes with scraps of music from chic cafes. Wandering through the city, Nicolas Pascarel happened on an intriguing building which appeared to be enveloped in a mysterious blue light. Once inside he found a jungle of concrete and peeling paint. There was no clear separation between the shops in the building and the dwellings. People walked around in a daze, as if they saw resignation as a survival strategy. Even Pascarel seemed to have landed in a hybrid world: a blue-painted corridor in whose dim light the ghosts of old Saigon encounter the high hopes of modern Ho Chi Minh City.

  • BLUE CORRIDOR (2005)

  • BLUE CORRIDOR (2005)

  • BLUE CORRIDOR (2005)

  • BLUE CORRIDOR (2005)

John Perkins

John Perkins

BUILDING A DREAM (2005)

In 2003 Dubai opened up its residential market for foreign buyers. Since then this major city of the Arab Emirates has grown explosively. With Arab financing, European and American project developers throw up one residential tower after another. The construction workers come primarily from India and Pakistan, where the monthly salary of 300 dollars is seen as relatively high. The dreadful labor conditions are the other side of the coin. They work long hours, sleep in overcrowded barracks, and are completely dependent on their employers. About 800 die on the building sites every year, chiefly from the extreme heat. There is hardly any medical care, and salaries often go unpaid. At present, guest workers form about eighty percent of the population of Dubai.

John Perkins >>

  • BUILDING A DREAM (2005)

    In 2003 Dubai opened up its residential market for foreign buyers. Since then this major city of the Arab Emirates has grown explosively. With Arab financing, European and American project developers throw up one residential tower after another. The construction workers come primarily from India and Pakistan, where the monthly salary of 300 dollars is seen as relatively high. The dreadful labor conditions are the other side of the coin. They work long hours, sleep in overcrowded barracks, and are completely dependent on their employers. About 800 die on the building sites every year, chiefly from the extreme heat. There is hardly any medical care, and salaries often go unpaid. At present, guest workers form about eighty percent of the population of Dubai.

  • BUILDING A DREAM (2005)

  • BUILDING A DREAM (2005)

  • BUILDING A DREAM (2005)

  • BUILDING A DREAM (2005)

Tom Pietrasik

Tom Pietrasik

THE TRANSFORMATION OF INDIA'S MIDDLE CLASS

With the liberalization of the economy, India's middle class split in two at the beginning of the 1990s. The traditionalists retained their strong position in the bureaucracy; the modern part opted for a riskier existence in international business. Where the first relax with family activities, the second seek their satisfaction in the seductions of the consumer society. These are often in conflict with moral, cultural and religious values. Thus the new middle class ends up wrestling not only with the demands and expectations of capitalism, but also with the gap between tradition and modernity.

Tom Pietrasik >>

  • THE TRANSFORMATION OF INDIA'S MIDDLE CLASS

    With the liberalization of the economy, India's middle class split in two at the beginning of the 1990s. The traditionalists retained their strong position in the bureaucracy; the modern part opted for a riskier existence in international business. Where the first relax with family activities, the second seek their satisfaction in the seductions of the consumer society. These are often in conflict with moral, cultural and religious values. Thus the new middle class ends up wrestling not only with the demands and expectations of capitalism, but also with the gap between tradition and modernity.

  • THE TRANSFORMATION OF INDIA'S MIDDLE CLASS

  • THE TRANSFORMATION OF INDIA'S MIDDLE CLASS

  • THE TRANSFORMATION OF INDIA'S MIDDLE CLASS

  • THE TRANSFORMATION OF INDIA'S MIDDLE CLASS

Matthew Sleeth

Matthew Sleeth

TOUR OF DUTY (1999)

After the people of East Timor voted in a referendum in 1998 for independence from Indonesia, their part of the island descended into an orgy of violence. In order to restore order, the international peacekeeping force INTERFET was formed. Australia provided the leadership, a task that the country was obliged to conscientiously fulfill as a former British colony, in the view of Matthew Sleeth. But above all else, the mission was a promotion campaign. From distributing teddy bears to organizing a benefit concert with Kylie Minogue, Australia pulled out all the stops to put themselves in the best possible light. No real contribution to solving East Timor's problems was ever forthcoming, according to TOUR OF DUTY (1999).

Matthew Sleeth >>

  • TOUR OF DUTY (1999)

    After the people of East Timor voted in a referendum in 1998 for independence from Indonesia, their part of the island descended into an orgy of violence. In order to restore order, the international peacekeeping force INTERFET was formed. Australia provided the leadership, a task that the country was obliged to conscientiously fulfill as a former British colony, in the view of Matthew Sleeth. But above all else, the mission was a promotion campaign. From distributing teddy bears to organizing a benefit concert with Kylie Minogue, Australia pulled out all the stops to put themselves in the best possible light. No real contribution to solving East Timor's problems was ever forthcoming, according to TOUR OF DUTY (1999).

  • TOUR OF DUTY (1999)

  • TOUR OF DUTY (1999)

  • TOUR OF DUTY (1999)

  • TOUR OF DUTY (1999)

John Stanmeyer

John Stanmeyer

BURMA NIGHTS, RANGOON NIGHTS

Under its military junta Myanmar (formerly Burma) has become isolated from the rest of the world. The country is among the poorest in the world. Only radical reforms can improve the situation for the about 50 million Myanmarese. To make their lives a bit more bearable, the population resort to striking colors. Inspired by their neighbors in China to the north, their homes, shops and automobiles are provided with a colorful collection of small lights. At night the country changes into a cheerful fantasy world which lets one temporarily forget the gray everyday realities of life there.

John Stanmeyer >>

  • BURMA NIGHTS, RANGOON NIGHTS

    Under its military junta Myanmar (formerly Burma) has become isolated from the rest of the world. The country is among the poorest in the world. Only radical reforms can improve the situation for the about 50 million Myanmarese. To make their lives a bit more bearable, the population resort to striking colors. Inspired by their neighbors in China to the north, their homes, shops and automobiles are provided with a colorful collection of small lights. At night the country changes into a cheerful fantasy world which lets one temporarily forget the gray everyday realities of life there.

  • BURMA NIGHTS, RANGOON NIGHTS

  • BURMA NIGHTS, RANGOON NIGHTS

  • BURMA NIGHTS, RANGOON NIGHTS

  • BURMA NIGHTS, RANGOON NIGHTS

Andrew Testa

Andrew Testa

THE MOKEN (2005)

THE MOKEN (2004) are people that lived from the sea. Once these sea gypsies, as they were called, roamed over the islands off the coast of Burma and Thailand. Now they are forced to live on the Surin islands, sixty kilometers off the Thai coast. They are forbidden to cut down trees to make canoes. That puts the Moken in a difficult position. On the one hand, they are simple nomads, who do not even know the word 'desire'. On the other, they can no longer escape modern society. Drink and junk food supersede their traditional fish catch. At the instigation of the Thai authorities, they are developing their lives as a tourist attraction. All the Moken survived the tsunami. Before this disaster they fled to higher ground, where they are still further removed from their traditional lifestyle.

Andrew Testa >>

  • THE MOKEN (2005)

    THE MOKEN (2004) are people that lived from the sea. Once these sea gypsies, as they were called, roamed over the islands off the coast of Burma and Thailand. Now they are forced to live on the Surin islands, sixty kilometers off the Thai coast. They are forbidden to cut down trees to make canoes. That puts the Moken in a difficult position. On the one hand, they are simple nomads, who do not even know the word 'desire'. On the other, they can no longer escape modern society. Drink and junk food supersede their traditional fish catch. At the instigation of the Thai authorities, they are developing their lives as a tourist attraction. All the Moken survived the tsunami. Before this disaster they fled to higher ground, where they are still further removed from their traditional lifestyle.

  • THE MOKEN (2005)

  • THE MOKEN (2005)

  • THE MOKEN (2005)

  • THE MOKEN (2005)

John Vink

John Vink

CAMBODIA - THE QUEST FOR LAND

Under the Khmer Rouge dictatorship, private land ownership was forbidden in Cambodia. The Pol Pot regime destroyed all land ownership records. The present political stability and economic growth have once again made land a valuable possession. The absence of rules and any clear title records it is however the law of the jungle that prevails. According to a recent study, at least twenty percent of landowners have lost their property to their more powerful countrymen. John Vink photographed the spreading struggle, which is leading to a new landless generation. In Cambodia, eighty percent of the population lives off the land.

John Vink >>

  • CAMBODIA - THE QUEST FOR LAND


    Under the Khmer Rouge dictatorship, private land ownership was forbidden in Cambodia. The Pol Pot regime destroyed all land ownership records. The present political stability and economic growth have once again made land a valuable possession. The absence of rules and any clear title records it is however the law of the jungle that prevails. According to a recent study, at least twenty percent of landowners have lost their property to their more powerful countrymen. John Vink photographed the spreading struggle, which is leading to a new landless generation. In Cambodia, eighty percent of the population lives off the land.

  • CAMBODIA - THE QUEST FOR LAND

  • CAMBODIA - THE QUEST FOR LAND

  • CAMBODIA - THE QUEST FOR LAND

  • CAMBODIA - THE QUEST FOR LAND

Another Asia III

Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth

Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth

THE ROAD TO KASHMIR (1914-1919)

With the threat of the First World War England created an army reserve. Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth (Great Britain, 1894-1979) joined up as a volunteer and was assigned to the 4th Queens battalion. Charlesworth was stationed in the northwestern province of Kashmir, India. From his embarkation at Southhampton until his discharge he recorded his experiences in photographs. He documented the life of British soldiers, the indigenous population and the Indian landscape. His time in India was not entirely without action, as his photographs reveal. The 4th Queens was deployed during the Mohmand blockade in November, 1917, and, not long before the battalion returned to England, in the Third Afghan War in 1919, including the rebellion in Peshawar. Charlesworth recorded both events in almost photojournalistic reportages.

Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth >>

  • THE ROAD TO KASHMIR (1914-1919)

    With the threat of the First World War England created an army reserve. Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth (Great Britain, 1894-1979) joined up as a volunteer and was assigned to the 4th Queens battalion. Charlesworth was stationed in the northwestern province of Kashmir, India. From his embarkation at Southhampton until his discharge he recorded his experiences in photographs. He documented the life of British soldiers, the indigenous population and the Indian landscape. His time in India was not entirely without action, as his photographs reveal. The 4th Queens was deployed during the Mohmand blockade in November, 1917, and, not long before the battalion returned to England, in the Third Afghan War in 1919, including the rebellion in Peshawar. Charlesworth recorded both events in almost photojournalistic reportages.

  • THE ROAD TO KASHMIR (1914-1919)

  • THE ROAD TO KASHMIR (1914-1919)

  • THE ROAD TO KASHMIR (1914-1919)

  • THE ROAD TO KASHMIR (1914-1919)

Kanu Gandhi & Saleem Arif Quadri

Kanu Gandhi & Saleem Arif Quadri

KANU GANDHI'S MAHATMA (1938-1946)

Kanu Gandhi, a second cousin of Mahatma Gandhi went to work as a typist and personal assistant to his uncle. Because he had direct access to this political leader, his colleagues urged him to photograph his life. He began doing so in 1938, with Gandhi's permission. Gandhi did lay down two conditions: he would not have to pose, and no flash would be used in the photographing. He also insisted that the photographs not be paid for by the independence movement. Kanu financed his reportage through the photographs he sold to newspapers in ever increasing numbers. With his wife Abha he grew into one of Gandhi's most important confidants. The bond only deepened after the death of Gandhi's wife in 1944. After the assassination attempt in 1948, Mahatma Gandhi died in Abha's arms. At that moment, Kanu was working on a reportage in what later was to become Bangladesh. Courtesy The Kanu Gandhi Estate

Kanu Gandhi & Saleem Arif Quadri >>

  • KANU GANDHI'S MAHATMA (1938-1946)

    Kanu Gandhi, a second cousin of Mahatma Gandhi went to work as a typist and personal assistant to his uncle. Because he had direct access to this political leader, his colleagues urged him to photograph his life. He began doing so in 1938, with Gandhi's permission. Gandhi did lay down two conditions: he would not have to pose, and no flash would be used in the photographing. He also insisted that the photographs not be paid for by the independence movement. Kanu financed his reportage through the photographs he sold to newspapers in ever increasing numbers. With his wife Abha he grew into one of Gandhi's most important confidants. The bond only deepened after the death of Gandhi's wife in 1944. After the assassination attempt in 1948, Mahatma Gandhi died in Abha's arms. At that moment, Kanu was working on a reportage in what later was to become Bangladesh.
    Courtesy The Kanu Gandhi Estate

  • KANU GANDHI'S MAHATMA (1938-1946)

  • KANU GANDHI'S MAHATMA (1938-1946)

  • KANU GANDHI'S MAHATMA (1938-1946)

  • KANU GANDHI'S MAHATMA (1938-1946)

Sue Hajdu

Sue Hajdu

UNSPEAKABLE MEMORY - TO CHOU CHOU FROM TEXAS, MISS PEACOCK (2000-2001)

Even thirty years after the Vietnam War ended, the war and the ideological conflict that lay behind it are absent from public debate. Particularly South Vietnam's role is regarded as taboo. Photographs from the period are reserved for family albums and private collections. Sue Hajdu collected photographs about the Vietnam War and the swinging Saigon of the 1960s and '70s. The first installation contains snapshots that a South Vietnamese officer made in Texas. He photographed himself in front of historic monuments and in a Western theme park, apparently during a language course that preceded military training in the U.S. On the backs he wrote messages for his Vietnamese girlfriend. The second installation consists of 130 images of Miss Peacock, a film star in the worldly Saigon of the 1960s. At the time, such photos were collected by film fans. Both installations offer a glimpse into a time that present-day Vietnam, ruled by the North, regards as degenerate.

Sue Hajdu >>

  • UNSPEAKABLE MEMORY - TO CHOU CHOU FROM TEXAS, MISS PEACOCK (2000-2001)

    Even thirty years after the Vietnam War ended, the war and the ideological conflict that lay behind it are absent from public debate. Particularly South Vietnam's role is regarded as taboo. Photographs from the period are reserved for family albums and private collections. Sue Hajdu collected photographs about the Vietnam War and the swinging Saigon of the 1960s and '70s. The first installation contains snapshots that a South Vietnamese officer made in Texas. He photographed himself in front of historic monuments and in a Western theme park, apparently during a language course that preceded military training in the U.S. On the backs he wrote messages for his Vietnamese girlfriend. The second installation consists of 130 images of Miss Peacock, a film star in the worldly Saigon of the 1960s. At the time, such photos were collected by film fans. Both installations offer a glimpse into a time that present-day Vietnam, ruled by the North, regards as degenerate.

  • UNSPEAKABLE MEMORY - TO CHOU CHOU FROM TEXAS, MISS PEACOCK (2000-2001)

  • UNSPEAKABLE MEMORY - TO CHOU CHOU FROM TEXAS, MISS PEACOCK (2000-2001)

  • UNSPEAKABLE MEMORY - TO CHOU CHOU FROM TEXAS, MISS PEACOCK (2000-2001)

  • UNSPEAKABLE MEMORY - TO CHOU CHOU FROM TEXAS, MISS PEACOCK (2000-2001)

  • UNSPEAKABLE MEMORY - TO CHOU CHOU FROM TEXAS, MISS PEACOCK (2000-2001)

Nishtha Jain

Nishtha Jain

CITY OF PHOTOS (2005)

City of Photos (2005) is a documentary of small photo studios in the cities of India. In these spaces neighborhood residents give free rein to their fantasy. With the backgrounds and props on hand they transport themselves to any place or time they desire. Retouching the photos makes the illusion complete. City of Photos begins in a photo studio in Calcutta, the city where the foundations for Indian photography were laid. Here people have themselves photographed in any situation imaginable. One of the favorite backdrops is the scene of the airplanes tearing into the Twin Towers on 9/11. The journey continues to a Muslim slum in Ahmedabad. Here the owner of a small photo studio has an intimate relation with his clients, permitting him to carry out their wishes precisely. Often the reasons why they have photographs made are tragic. Many Muslims pose amid the ruins of their houses, which have been plundered and set ablaze in state-supported anti-Islamic riots. A Muslim who cannot associate with the Hindu girl he loves asks for a double portrait, created by computer manipulation.

Nishtha Jain >>

  • CITY OF PHOTOS (2005)

    City of Photos (2005) is a documentary of small photo studios in the cities of India. In these spaces neighborhood residents give free rein to their fantasy. With the backgrounds and props on hand they transport themselves to any place or time they desire. Retouching the photos makes the illusion complete. City of Photos begins in a photo studio in Calcutta, the city where the foundations for Indian photography were laid. Here people have themselves photographed in any situation imaginable. One of the favorite backdrops is the scene of the airplanes tearing into the Twin Towers on 9/11. The journey continues to a Muslim slum in Ahmedabad. Here the owner of a small photo studio has an intimate relation with his clients, permitting him to carry out their wishes precisely. Often the reasons why they have photographs made are tragic. Many Muslims pose amid the ruins of their houses, which have been plundered and set ablaze in state-supported anti-Islamic riots. A Muslim who cannot associate with the Hindu girl he loves asks for a double portrait, created by computer manipulation.

  • CITY OF PHOTOS (2005)

  • CITY OF PHOTOS (2005)

  • CITY OF PHOTOS (2005)

  • CITY OF PHOTOS (2005)

Koninklijk Instituut voor de Tropen

Koninklijk Instituut voor de Tropen

THE SINGKEP TIN COMPANY

In 1917 the Royal Tropical Institute - then the Colonial Museum - was sent a series of glass negatives with portraits of the employees of the Singkep Tin Company. They were a response to a contest through which the Colonial Museum was seeking to put together a photo show emphasizing the prosperity of the Dutch East Indies. What is exceptional about the photographs is their focus on local employees. Studio portraits in those days were the preserve of the white colonial elite. Native employees were at the most photographed on the work floor or in the fields. It is not known who made the series. Regarding the employees depicted, only their function, and sometimes their ethnic background, is reported. That makes it a contradictory project. On the one hand, the portraits bestow status and respect, on the other they emphasize the archetype just as much as the individual.The series of portraits of employees is part of the collection of KIT (the Royal Tropical Museum) in Amsterdam. The exhibition for which the photographs were submitted was never realized, due to the outbreak of the First World War.

Koninklijk Instituut voor de Tropen >>

  • THE SINGKEP TIN COMPANY

    In 1917 the Royal Tropical Institute - then the Colonial Museum - was sent a series of glass negatives with portraits of the employees of the Singkep Tin Company. They were a response to a contest through which the Colonial Museum was seeking to put together a photo show emphasizing the prosperity of the Dutch East Indies. What is exceptional about the photographs is their focus on local employees. Studio portraits in those days were the preserve of the white colonial elite. Native employees were at the most photographed on the work floor or in the fields. It is not known who made the series. Regarding the employees depicted, only their function, and sometimes their ethnic background, is reported. That makes it a contradictory project. On the one hand, the portraits bestow status and respect, on the other they emphasize the archetype just as much as the individual.
    The series of portraits of employees is part of the collection of KIT (the Royal Tropical Museum) in Amsterdam. The exhibition for which the photographs were submitted was never realized, due to the outbreak of the First World War.

  • THE SINGKEP TIN COMPANY

  • THE SINGKEP TIN COMPANY

  • THE SINGKEP TIN COMPANY

  • THE SINGKEP TIN COMPANY

Christophe Loviny

Christophe Loviny

DREAMS AND NIGHTMARES (1901-2006)

Christophe Loviny has edited the remarkable history of Cambodia into a six-part presentation. He opens with historical images of the era of the asparas. These 'celestial dancers' took part in ceremonies and were seen as messengers from the gods. Then come images of what Loviny calls 'the lazy colonization', by the French, which appeared to be a blessing for the preservation of culture. The third section is dominated by the figure of Norodom Sihanouk, a king. The fourth series focuses on S-21, the infamous Khmer Rouge extermination camp where prisoners were photographed before their execution. The photographs largely come from the album of a Khmer officer who worked in S-21. Loviny combined all these historical images with his photographs of the careful return of the asparas, a symbol for the renaissance that Cambodia is experiencing today. The hexad ends with photographs that were made by street children of Angkor whose parents have been maimed by landmines.

Christophe Loviny >>

  • DREAMS AND NIGHTMARES (1901-2006)

    Christophe Loviny has edited the remarkable history of Cambodia into a six-part presentation. He opens with historical images of the era of the asparas. These 'celestial dancers' took part in ceremonies and were seen as messengers from the gods. Then come images of what Loviny calls 'the lazy colonization', by the French, which appeared to be a blessing for the preservation of culture. The third section is dominated by the figure of Norodom Sihanouk, a king. The fourth series focuses on S-21, the infamous Khmer Rouge extermination camp where prisoners were photographed before their execution. The photographs largely come from the album of a Khmer officer who worked in S-21. Loviny combined all these historical images with his photographs of the careful return of the asparas, a symbol for the renaissance that Cambodia is experiencing today. The hexad ends with photographs that were made by street children of Angkor whose parents have been maimed by landmines.

  • DREAMS AND NIGHTMARES (1901-2006)

  • DREAMS AND NIGHTMARES (1901-2006)

  • DREAMS AND NIGHTMARES (1901-2006)

  • DREAMS AND NIGHTMARES (1901-2006)

  • DREAMS AND NIGHTMARES (1901-2006)

  • DREAMS AND NIGHTMARES (1901-2006)

  • DREAMS AND NIGHTMARES (1901-2006)

  • DREAMS AND NIGHTMARES (1901-2006)

  • DREAMS AND NIGHTMARES (1901-2006)

Eduardo Masferré

Eduardo Masferré

A PHILIPPINE ARCADIA (1935-1955)

Eduardo Masferré (Philippines, 1909-1955) is regarded as the patriarch of Filipino photography. From 1934 he devoted himself to the documentation of the Igorots, mountain tribes with a reputation as merciless headhunters. Masferré wanted to record their lives before they were overtaken by modern times. After the Second World War he opened a photo studio. He supported his rapidly growing family with agricultural activities, which brought him still closer to the lives of the Igorots. Masferré intended to present a complete portrait. A PHILIPPINE ARCADIA (1935-1955) shows not only the proud faces of the Igorots, but also their manner of life, their work and their rice fields, which were built against the mountain slopes in striking terraces. The importance of his work was recognized only outside The Philippines. The Filipinos initially had little use for photographs that showed them primarily as a primitive people. Only in the 1980s, with the rise of a national consciousness, did Masferré's work find acceptance in his own country.

Eduardo Masferré >>

  • A PHILIPPINE ARCADIA (1935-1955)

    Eduardo Masferré (Philippines, 1909-1955) is regarded as the patriarch of Filipino photography. From 1934 he devoted himself to the documentation of the Igorots, mountain tribes with a reputation as merciless headhunters. Masferré wanted to record their lives before they were overtaken by modern times. After the Second World War he opened a photo studio. He supported his rapidly growing family with agricultural activities, which brought him still closer to the lives of the Igorots. Masferré intended to present a complete portrait. A PHILIPPINE ARCADIA (1935-1955) shows not only the proud faces of the Igorots, but also their manner of life, their work and their rice fields, which were built against the mountain slopes in striking terraces. The importance of his work was recognized only outside The Philippines. The Filipinos initially had little use for photographs that showed them primarily as a primitive people. Only in the 1980s, with the rise of a national consciousness, did Masferré's work find acceptance in his own country.

  • A PHILIPPINE ARCADIA (1935-1955)

  • A PHILIPPINE ARCADIA (1935-1955)

  • A PHILIPPINE ARCADIA (1935-1955)

  • A PHILIPPINE ARCADIA (1935-1955)

Mai Nam

Mai Nam

THE WAR IN VIETNAM (1960-1975)

Although the Vietnam War is primarily discussed from the American perspective, the conflict was thoroughly documented by the other camp as well. One of the photographers who traveled with the North Vietnamese Army was Mai Nam. From 1960 to 1975 he photographed the actions of the Vietcong, often using an old camera and rolls of film that were long past their use-by date. He created a flash in the often dark underground corridors of the resistance by setting off the gunpowder from AK-47 machine gun bullets. With his work Mai Nam, reporting for the North Vietnamese newspaper Tien Phong, wanted to honor the young farmers, workers and students who voluntarily took up arms against the Americans. He usually left recording the battles themselves to fellow photographers. Mai Nam was interested in everyday life at the front, seeking out the cheerful moments. 'My photos are a weapon in this bitter conflict,' said the photographer. That was literally the case in 1967, when his photo of a crashed American bomber was distributed nationally with the text 'Happy New Year!'

Mai Nam >>

  • THE WAR IN VIETNAM (1960-1975)

    Although the Vietnam War is primarily discussed from the American perspective, the conflict was thoroughly documented by the other camp as well. One of the photographers who traveled with the North Vietnamese Army was Mai Nam. From 1960 to 1975 he photographed the actions of the Vietcong, often using an old camera and rolls of film that were long past their use-by date. He created a flash in the often dark underground corridors of the resistance by setting off the gunpowder from AK-47 machine gun bullets. With his work Mai Nam, reporting for the North Vietnamese newspaper Tien Phong, wanted to honor the young farmers, workers and students who voluntarily took up arms against the Americans. He usually left recording the battles themselves to fellow photographers. Mai Nam was interested in everyday life at the front, seeking out the cheerful moments. 'My photos are a weapon in this bitter conflict,' said the photographer. That was literally the case in 1967, when his photo of a crashed American bomber was distributed nationally with the text 'Happy New Year!'

  • THE WAR IN VIETNAM (1960-1975)

  • THE WAR IN VIETNAM (1960-1975)

  • THE WAR IN VIETNAM (1960-1975)

  • THE WAR IN VIETNAM (1960-1975)

Raza Kazim & Rashida Raza

Raza Kazim & Rashida Raza

PORTRAITS (1979-2003)

Raza Kazim, born in India, has been photographing since his youth. As a Muslim he was active in the struggle for an independent Pakistan, but dropped out, disillusioned with the rigidity of his fellow campaigners. After a series of ideological detours, he presently terms himself 'a silent dissident'. Kazim founded the Sanjan Institute for Music, Philosophy and Photography in Pakistan, and is head of the photography department. He also founded an educational organization for Pakistani women. With his wife Rashida Raza he also organizes workshops on photography for students, girls and street children in Pakistan and Afghanistan.

Raza Kazim & Rashida Raza >>

  • PORTRAITS (1979-2003)

    Raza Kazim, born in India, has been photographing since his youth. As a Muslim he was active in the struggle for an independent Pakistan, but dropped out, disillusioned with the rigidity of his fellow campaigners. After a series of ideological detours, he presently terms himself 'a silent dissident'. Kazim founded the Sanjan Institute for Music, Philosophy and Photography in Pakistan, and is head of the photography department. He also founded an educational organization for Pakistani women. With his wife Rashida Raza he also organizes workshops on photography for students, girls and street children in Pakistan and Afghanistan.

  • PORTRAITS (1979-2003)

  • PORTRAITS (1979-2003)

  • PORTRAITS (1979-2003)

  • PORTRAITS (1979-2003)

Gogi Pehlwan

Gogi Pehlwan

RU KITCH, STREET PHOTOGRAPHY FROM THE PUNJAB (1950-2000)

Gogi Pehlwan >>

  • RU KITCH, STREET PHOTOGRAPHY FROM THE PUNJAB (1950-2000)

  • RU KITCH, STREET PHOTOGRAPHY FROM THE PUNJAB (1950-2000)

  • RU KITCH, STREET PHOTOGRAPHY FROM THE PUNJAB (1950-2000)

Mohammad Amin Naveed

Mohammad Amin Naveed

RU KITCH, STREET PHOTOGRAPHY FROM THE PUNJAB (1950-2000)

Mohammad Amin Naveed >>

  • RU KITCH, STREET PHOTOGRAPHY FROM THE PUNJAB (1950-2000)

  • RU KITCH, STREET PHOTOGRAPHY FROM THE PUNJAB (1950-2000)

  • RU KITCH, STREET PHOTOGRAPHY FROM THE PUNJAB (1950-2000)

Babba Bhutta

Babba Bhutta

RU KITCH, STREET PHOTOGRAPHY FROM THE PUNJAB (1950-2000)

Babba Bhutta >>

  • RU KITCH, STREET PHOTOGRAPHY FROM THE PUNJAB (1950-2000)

  • RU KITCH, STREET PHOTOGRAPHY FROM THE PUNJAB (1950-2000)

  • RU KITCH, STREET PHOTOGRAPHY FROM THE PUNJAB (1950-2000)

Rajesh Vora

Rajesh Vora

TRAVELING PHOTO STUDIO (2000-2004)

Ten wooden planks, fifty bamboo poles, fabric stretching several meters, and 24 lamps. That is all that is necessary to set up a mobile photo studio in India. But to be really successful, one must invest in hand-painted backdrops, several cardboard Bollywood stars, a motor scooter and a life-size Disney character. That's how Rashid Shaikh began his Kulsum Studio 25 years ago. He journeyed around the country, generally in the company of a traveling theatre troop. He did well from it; today there are three Kulsum Studios. One of them is run by Asgar, Rashid's son, who sometimes is on the road for up to ten months at a time. His clients consist primarily of poor Indians. For 35 cents they can have their wishes fulfilled. Posing with a Bollywood star is particularly popular. Sometimes whole scenes from a film are recreated. Religious scenes and poses with luxury articles also do well. But there is never more than one take possible - clicking the shutter a second time would cut into the profits of the Kulsum Studio.

Rajesh Vora >>

  • TRAVELING PHOTO STUDIO (2000-2004)

    Ten wooden planks, fifty bamboo poles, fabric stretching several meters, and 24 lamps. That is all that is necessary to set up a mobile photo studio in India. But to be really successful, one must invest in hand-painted backdrops, several cardboard Bollywood stars, a motor scooter and a life-size Disney character. That's how Rashid Shaikh began his Kulsum Studio 25 years ago. He journeyed around the country, generally in the company of a traveling theatre troop. He did well from it; today there are three Kulsum Studios. One of them is run by Asgar, Rashid's son, who sometimes is on the road for up to ten months at a time. His clients consist primarily of poor Indians. For 35 cents they can have their wishes fulfilled. Posing with a Bollywood star is particularly popular. Sometimes whole scenes from a film are recreated. Religious scenes and poses with luxury articles also do well. But there is never more than one take possible - clicking the shutter a second time would cut into the profits of the Kulsum Studio.

  • TRAVELING PHOTO STUDIO (2000-2004)

  • TRAVELING PHOTO STUDIO (2000-2004)

  • TRAVELING PHOTO STUDIO (2000-2004)

  • TRAVELING PHOTO STUDIO (2000-2004)

Yee I-Lann

Yee I-Lann

THROUGH ROSE-COLOURED GLASSES (2002)

Until the 1980s, only the upper class and a small part of the middle class in Malaysia could afford photo cameras. The rest of the population had to rely on photo studios, where they could have their portrait done, with (or without) the help of props. One of these studios, the Pakard Photo Studio in Malacca, was owned by an immigrant Chinese, Tam Hong Lam, and his wife. They started their shop in 1959, two years after the Federation of Malaysia became independent from the British Empire. In 1963 the peninsula joined together with the northern part of Borneo to make up the state of Malaysia. A procession of new Malaysians had themselves photographed in the Pakard Photo Studio, unintentionally creating a detailed social-cultural archive with images full of innocent and intimacy from the period in which Malaysia was formed. Tam Hong Lam was an extremely productive photographer. During his career he received three successive generations in his studio.The Malaysian photo artist I-Lann Yee (Malaysia, b. 1971), represented in 'Another Asia' with SULU STORIES, used Tam Hong Lam's photo archive for an installation. THROUGH ROSE-COLOURED GLASSES (2002), with photographs from the years 1977 to 1982 (the older negatives were lost in a flood) offers a cross section of Malaysian history. The Pakard Photo Studio is still in business, at the same address in Malacca, now run by Tam Kwong Win, the son of Tam Hong Lam.

Yee I-Lann >>

  • THROUGH ROSE-COLOURED GLASSES (2002)

    Until the 1980s, only the upper class and a small part of the middle class in Malaysia could afford photo cameras. The rest of the population had to rely on photo studios, where they could have their portrait done, with (or without) the help of props. One of these studios, the Pakard Photo Studio in Malacca, was owned by an immigrant Chinese, Tam Hong Lam, and his wife. They started their shop in 1959, two years after the Federation of Malaysia became independent from the British Empire. In 1963 the peninsula joined together with the northern part of Borneo to make up the state of Malaysia. A procession of new Malaysians had themselves photographed in the Pakard Photo Studio, unintentionally creating a detailed social-cultural archive with images full of innocent and intimacy from the period in which Malaysia was formed. Tam Hong Lam was an extremely productive photographer. During his career he received three successive generations in his studio.

    The Malaysian photo artist I-Lann Yee (Malaysia, b. 1971), represented in 'Another Asia' with SULU STORIES, used Tam Hong Lam's photo archive for an installation. THROUGH ROSE-COLOURED GLASSES (2002), with photographs from the years 1977 to 1982 (the older negatives were lost in a flood) offers a cross section of Malaysian history. The Pakard Photo Studio is still in business, at the same address in Malacca, now run by Tam Kwong Win, the son of Tam Hong Lam.

  • THROUGH ROSE-COLOURED GLASSES (2002)

  • THROUGH ROSE-COLOURED GLASSES (2002)

  • THROUGH ROSE-COLOURED GLASSES (2002)

  • THROUGH ROSE-COLOURED GLASSES (2002)

  • THROUGH ROSE-COLOURED GLASSES (2002)