Photographers / Nazar

Nazar - Arab eyes

Nadia Benchallal

Nadia Benchallal

FROM SHORE TO SHORE (1992-1999)

Paris-Algiers-Paris is the rhythm for many Algerians who have emigrated to France. They endlessly shuttle back and forth between their birth land and their new homeland - not only physically, but also in their heads. With her photographs, Nadia Benchallal, born in France of Algerian parents, wants to tell what it is like to stand between two worlds. FROM SHORE TO SHORE is a report of the trips that she made to Algeria in the footsteps of her parents. She places the photographs between portraits of herself and her parents, as a visualisation of the journey she made to her roots. Her regular stays in Algeria enabled Benchallal to record everyday life there in all its intimacy.

Nadia Benchallal >>

  • FROM SHORE TO SHORE (1992-1999)

    Paris-Algiers-Paris is the rhythm for many Algerians who have emigrated to France. They endlessly shuttle back and forth between their birth land and their new homeland - not only physically, but also in their heads. With her photographs, Nadia Benchallal, born in France of Algerian parents, wants to tell what it is like to stand between two worlds. FROM SHORE TO SHORE is a report of the trips that she made to Algeria in the footsteps of her parents. She places the photographs between portraits of herself and her parents, as a visualisation of the journey she made to her roots. Her regular stays in Algeria enabled Benchallal to record everyday life there in all its intimacy.

  • FROM SHORE TO SHORE (1992-1999)

  • FROM SHORE TO SHORE (1992-1999)

  • FROM SHORE TO SHORE (1992-1999)

  • FROM SHORE TO SHORE (1992-1999)

Hicham Benohoud

Hicham Benohoud

LA SALLE DE CLASSE (2000-2002)

Hicham Benohoud is an instructor in visual arts in Marrakech. For LA SALLE DE CLASSE he would ask one of his pupils to interrupt their work at a random moment and pose for him. For this they had to take an unorthodox pose and could make use of all the props that were present in the classroom. After posing the pupil could continue with work. The result is a series of remarkable photo portraits in which the pupils were forced to find a new demeanour in relation to their instructor. The surrealistic character of the portraits is strengthened by the fact that while the photos were being made, the rest of the class had to continue with their work.

Hicham Benohoud >>

  • LA SALLE DE CLASSE (2000-2002)

    Hicham Benohoud is an instructor in visual arts in Marrakech. For LA SALLE DE CLASSE he would ask one of his pupils to interrupt their work at a random moment and pose for him. For this they had to take an unorthodox pose and could make use of all the props that were present in the classroom. After posing the pupil could continue with work. The result is a series of remarkable photo portraits in which the pupils were forced to find a new demeanour in relation to their instructor. The surrealistic character of the portraits is strengthened by the fact that while the photos were being made, the rest of the class had to continue with their work.

  • LA SALLE DE CLASSE (2000-2002)

  • LA SALLE DE CLASSE (2000-2002)

  • LA SALLE DE CLASSE (2000-2002)

  • LA SALLE DE CLASSE (2000-2002)

Bruno Boudjellal

Bruno Boudjellal

JOURS INTRANQUILLES (1993-2003)

As a child of a French mother and an Algerian father, in 1993 Bruno Boudjelal went in search of his Arab roots. Accompanied by his father and his camera, he journeyed to Algeria, which he would visit many more times in the following years. He found his family and began to photograph them and their lives. With the years his interest widened to the whole Algerian society, which he photographed sometimes in colour, but mostly in black and white. Boudjelal’s style is intuitive. He takes his photographs by feeling, without reflecting on the framing and sometimes without even focusing. The result is a series of intimate photographs, made from the heart.

Bruno Boudjellal >>

  • JOURS INTRANQUILLES (1993-2003)

    As a child of a French mother and an Algerian father, in 1993 Bruno Boudjelal went in search of his Arab roots. Accompanied by his father and his camera, he journeyed to Algeria, which he would visit many more times in the following years. He found his family and began to photograph them and their lives. With the years his interest widened to the whole Algerian society, which he photographed sometimes in colour, but mostly in black and white. Boudjelal’s style is intuitive. He takes his photographs by feeling, without reflecting on the framing and sometimes without even focusing. The result is a series of intimate photographs, made from the heart.

  • JOURS INTRANQUILLES (1993-2003)

  • JOURS INTRANQUILLES (1993-2003)

  • JOURS INTRANQUILLES (1993-2003)

  • JOURS INTRANQUILLES (1993-2003)

Nabil Boutros

Nabil Boutros

COPTS OF EGYPT (1997-2003)

The history of Egypt has seen many religions. The Christianity of the Copts has its roots in the time of the pharaohs and has undergone influences from the Arab and Byzantine worlds. Despite various attempts to Islamise their land, the Copts still make up about ten percent of the Egyptian population. That makes the them largest Christian community in the Middle East.

Nabil Boutros >>

  • COPTS OF EGYPT (1997-2003)

    The history of Egypt has seen many religions. The Christianity of the Copts has its roots in the time of the pharaohs and has undergone influences from the Arab and Byzantine worlds. Despite various attempts to Islamise their land, the Copts still make up about ten percent of the Egyptian population. That makes the them largest Christian community in the Middle East.

  • COPTS OF EGYPT (1997-2003)

  • COPTS OF EGYPT (1997-2003)

  • COPTS OF EGYPT (1997-2003)

Hichem Driss

Hichem Driss

A TRAVERS LES CÔTES (1999)

The Tunisian photographer Hichem Driss (b. 1968) likes to experiment. He uses different photographic techniques and various, often antique cameras. For instance, since 1999 he has worked considerably with the camera obscura (also called a pinhole camera), an apparatus from the earliest days of photography – in fact, nothing more than a box with a hole in it. There is no lens, which produces photographs of a very different sort. They are less sharp, creating a softer image, and they often exhibit distortions in perspective. Those are qualities that Driss finds ideal for his experiments. For A TRAVERS LES CÔTES he photographed the north coast of his native land. He chose to do this on days when the wind was strong and the sea rough, in order to achieve the most spectacular results. ‘Thanks to the camera obscura I can produce images that the human eye would never be able to see’, explains Driss, who has been working as a freelance photographer in Paris since 2002.

Hichem Driss >>

  • A TRAVERS LES CÔTES (1999)

    The Tunisian photographer Hichem Driss (b. 1968) likes to experiment. He uses different photographic techniques and various, often antique cameras. For instance, since 1999 he has worked considerably with the camera obscura (also called a pinhole camera), an apparatus from the earliest days of photography – in fact, nothing more than a box with a hole in it. There is no lens, which produces photographs of a very different sort. They are less sharp, creating a softer image, and they often exhibit distortions in perspective. Those are qualities that Driss finds ideal for his experiments. For A TRAVERS LES CÔTES he photographed the north coast of his native land. He chose to do this on days when the wind was strong and the sea rough, in order to achieve the most spectacular results. ‘Thanks to the camera obscura I can produce images that the human eye would never be able to see’, explains Driss, who has been working as a freelance photographer in Paris since 2002.

  • A TRAVERS LES CÔTES (1999)

  • A TRAVERS LES CÔTES (1999)

  • A TRAVERS LES CÔTES (1999)

  • A TRAVERS LES CÔTES (1999)

Kamel Dridi

Kamel Dridi

LES OFFRANDES DE L’OMBRE (1978-1988)

In LES OFFRANDES DE L’OMBRE the Tunisian photographer Kamel Dridi seeks to give moments from their youth back to adults from the Maghreb (Morocco, Tunisia and Algeria). The series shows a number of religious rituals that are inextricably linked with life in the Maghreb, such as daily prayer and purification in the hammam (the Turkish bath). In order to emphasise the intimacy of the rituals, Dridi adopts the attitude of a voyeur. Moreover, in doing so he represents the standpoint of a child, which reinforces the nostalgic charge of the photographs. But LES OFFRANDES DE L’OMBRE will not evoke only positive feelings, Dridi acknowledges. Many from the Maghreb merely found the religious practices of their elders tedious, because as a child they could not for the moment be the centre of interest.

Kamel Dridi >>

  • LES OFFRANDES DE L’OMBRE (1978-1988)

    In LES OFFRANDES DE L’OMBRE the Tunisian photographer Kamel Dridi seeks to give moments from their youth back to adults from the Maghreb (Morocco, Tunisia and Algeria). The series shows a number of religious rituals that are inextricably linked with life in the Maghreb, such as daily prayer and purification in the hammam (the Turkish bath). In order to emphasise the intimacy of the rituals, Dridi adopts the attitude of a voyeur. Moreover, in doing so he represents the standpoint of a child, which reinforces the nostalgic charge of the photographs. But LES OFFRANDES DE L’OMBRE will not evoke only positive feelings, Dridi acknowledges. Many from the Maghreb merely found the religious practices of their elders tedious, because as a child they could not for the moment be the centre of interest.

  • LES OFFRANDES DE L’OMBRE (1978-1988)

  • LES OFFRANDES DE L’OMBRE (1978-1988)

  • LES OFFRANDES DE L’OMBRE (1978-1988)

Lalla Essaydi

Lalla Essaydi

CONVERGING TERRITORIES (2003-2004)

According to Islamic traditions, the street is the domain of the male, and women are condemned to live indoors. There they are in fact nothing more than decoration, suggests photographer Lalla Essaydi, a situation she visualises in CONVERGING TERRITORIES. Essaydi places Islamic women in an isolated space and literally decorates them with texts written in henna. The texts – a reversal of the silence of their isolation – give the women a voice, with which they can speak to the space and to one another. The rebellious character of the photographs is magnified by the fact that within Islam calligraphy may not be practised by women.

Lalla Essaydi >>

  • CONVERGING TERRITORIES (2003-2004)

    According to Islamic traditions, the street is the domain of the male, and women are condemned to live indoors. There they are in fact nothing more than decoration, suggests photographer Lalla Essaydi, a situation she visualises in CONVERGING TERRITORIES. Essaydi places Islamic women in an isolated space and literally decorates them with texts written in henna. The texts – a reversal of the silence of their isolation – give the women a voice, with which they can speak to the space and to one another. The rebellious character of the photographs is magnified by the fact that within Islam calligraphy may not be practised by women.

  • CONVERGING TERRITORIES (2003-2004)

  • CONVERGING TERRITORIES (2003-2004)

  • CONVERGING TERRITORIES (2003-2004)

  • CONVERGING TERRITORIES (2003-2004)

Reem Al Faisal

Reem Al Faisal

THE HAJJ (2000-2003)

For the Saudi princess Reem Al Faisal, photography is a means of honouring God’s presence. With THE HAJJ she reports on the pilgrimage to Mecca which every Moslem must undertake once in his life. But Reem Al Faisal – herself a Muslim – does not confine herself to recording religious expressions. With her photographs she wants to also reveal the divine in man and nature. Thus she sees the presence of light as one of the many manifestations of God in everyday life.

Reem Al Faisal >>

  • THE HAJJ (2000-2003)

    For the Saudi princess Reem Al Faisal, photography is a means of honouring God’s presence. With THE HAJJ she reports on the pilgrimage to Mecca which every Moslem must undertake once in his life. But Reem Al Faisal – herself a Muslim – does not confine herself to recording religious expressions. With her photographs she wants to also reveal the divine in man and nature. Thus she sees the presence of light as one of the many manifestations of God in everyday life.

  • THE HAJJ (2000-2003)

  • THE HAJJ (2000-2003)

  • THE HAJJ (2000-2003)

  • THE HAJJ (2000-2003)

Ymane Fakhir

Ymane Fakhir

UN ANGE PASSE (2003)

Ymane Fakhir photographed a wedding in the land of her birth, Morocco. She sees it as a colourful spectacle, filled purely with actors: everything is made up, seduction and theatre. A Moroccan wedding is prepared down to the smallest details, with nothing left to chance. The bridal pair are placed on a couch on a platform, so that all the guests can clearly see them. Fakhir sees this as the antithesis of the ordinary life of the Moroccan woman. Normally she is stimulated to be as good as unconscious of her body and presence. During the wedding she is suddenly the centre of attention and is exhibited like an object, clothed according to the dictates of fashion and religion.

Ymane Fakhir >>

  • UN ANGE PASSE (2003)

    Ymane Fakhir photographed a wedding in the land of her birth, Morocco. She sees it as a colourful spectacle, filled purely with actors: everything is made up, seduction and theatre. A Moroccan wedding is prepared down to the smallest details, with nothing left to chance. The bridal pair are placed on a couch on a platform, so that all the guests can clearly see them. Fakhir sees this as the antithesis of the ordinary life of the Moroccan woman. Normally she is stimulated to be as good as unconscious of her body and presence. During the wedding she is suddenly the centre of attention and is exhibited like an object, clothed according to the dictates of fashion and religion.

  • UN ANGE PASSE (2003)

  • UN ANGE PASSE (2003)

  • UN ANGE PASSE (2003)

  • UN ANGE PASSE (2003)

Khaled Tarek Fazaa

Khaled Tarek Fazaa

YEMEN IN FOCUS (2000-2004)

Khaled Tarek Fazaa is the photo correspondent in Yemen for the French news agency AFP. YEMEN IN FOCUS is a selection from the photographs that he has made over the past four years of ordinary life in this republic, which lies on the most southerly end of the Arabian peninsula. Yemen is still to a large extent a tribal society, in which carrying weapons – symbols of character and masculinity – is the most normal thing in the world. It is estimated that there are about sixty million firearms in circulation in Yemen among a population of less than twenty million. In 1990 North and South Yemen were united into the Republic of Yemen. In recent years the country has undergone an economic crisis, which has particularly struck the middle and lower classes.

Khaled Tarek Fazaa >>

  • YEMEN IN FOCUS (2000-2004)

    Khaled Tarek Fazaa is the photo correspondent in Yemen for the French news agency AFP. YEMEN IN FOCUS is a selection from the photographs that he has made over the past four years of ordinary life in this republic, which lies on the most southerly end of the Arabian peninsula. Yemen is still to a large extent a tribal society, in which carrying weapons – symbols of character and masculinity – is the most normal thing in the world. It is estimated that there are about sixty million firearms in circulation in Yemen among a population of less than twenty million. In 1990 North and South Yemen were united into the Republic of Yemen. In recent years the country has undergone an economic crisis, which has particularly struck the middle and lower classes.

  • YEMEN IN FOCUS (2000-2004)

  • YEMEN IN FOCUS (2000-2004)

  • YEMEN IN FOCUS (2000-2004)

  • YEMEN IN FOCUS (2000-2004)

Tarek Al-Ghoussein

Tarek Al-Ghoussein

SELF PORTRAIT (2003)

Palestine is the Sisyphus of our time. As his punishment from the gods, this mythological figure had to spend eternity rolling a stone up a hill, only to always have it roll back down. In the opinion of Tarek Al-Ghoussein, the Western media’s presentation of the Palestinians is similar. They likewise seem to be engaged in a meaningless and endless struggle, in which a stone is also central. In a series of self-portraits Al-Ghoussein critiques the cliché of the Palestinians that – particularly after September 11 – seems to be ineradicable in the Western media. In the style of Levis and Marlboro he creates an imaginary advertising campaign in which the image of the terrorist with a stone and headscarf functions as a logo for the Intifada.

Tarek Al-Ghoussein >>

  • SELF PORTRAIT (2003)

    Palestine is the Sisyphus of our time. As his punishment from the gods, this mythological figure had to spend eternity rolling a stone up a hill, only to always have it roll back down. In the opinion of Tarek Al-Ghoussein, the Western media’s presentation of the Palestinians is similar. They likewise seem to be engaged in a meaningless and endless struggle, in which a stone is also central. In a series of self-portraits Al-Ghoussein critiques the cliché of the Palestinians that – particularly after September 11 – seems to be ineradicable in the Western media. In the style of Levis and Marlboro he creates an imaginary advertising campaign in which the image of the terrorist with a stone and headscarf functions as a logo for the Intifada.

  • SELF PORTRAIT (2003)

  • SELF PORTRAIT (2003)

  • SELF PORTRAIT (2003)

  • SELF PORTRAIT (2003)

Hala Elkoussy

Hala Elkoussy

(RE)CONSTRUCTION (2003)

In (RE)CONSTRUCTION the Egyptian photographer Hala Elkoussy focuses on the tension between photography and reality. At first sight her photographs capture familiar moments from everyday life in Cairo, but in reality they have been staged. Most of the photographs deliberately betray their staged origin by their out of the ordinary poses or situations. Others are more subtle and do not easily give away their nature. The result is a mildly surrealistic series of photographs that consist of earthly images, but do not seem of this world.

Hala Elkoussy >>

  • (RE)CONSTRUCTION (2003)

    In (RE)CONSTRUCTION the Egyptian photographer Hala Elkoussy focuses on the tension between photography and reality. At first sight her photographs capture familiar moments from everyday life in Cairo, but in reality they have been staged. Most of the photographs deliberately betray their staged origin by their out of the ordinary poses or situations. Others are more subtle and do not easily give away their nature. The result is a mildly surrealistic series of photographs that consist of earthly images, but do not seem of this world.

  • (RE)CONSTRUCTION (2003)

  • (RE)CONSTRUCTION (2003)

  • (RE)CONSTRUCTION (2003)

  • (RE)CONSTRUCTION (2003)

Joana Hadjithomas & Khalil Joreige

Joana Hadjithomas & Khalil Joreige

EL FILM EL MAFKOUD (THE LOST FILM) (2003)

Joana Hadjithomas and Khalil Joreige are active as filmmakers, artists and university instructors. Their collective oeuvre comprises books, photo and video installations, short films and one feature film. A copy of this film, entitled Around the Pink House, disappeared in Yemen in 2000 under mysterious circumstances, on precisely the tenth anniversary of the unification of North and South Yemen. Hadjithomas and Joreige became intrigued about the incident because cinema is of hardly any significance in Yemen. They began a search for the truth about what had occurred, and recorded their experiences in EL FILM EL MAFKOUD. Among other things, it reveals how the pair are confronted with the image which exists of them in Yemen, and with they status they have as Arab filmmakers.

Joana Hadjithomas & Khalil Joreige >>

  • EL FILM EL MAFKOUD (THE LOST FILM) (2003)

    Joana Hadjithomas and Khalil Joreige are active as filmmakers, artists and university instructors. Their collective oeuvre comprises books, photo and video installations, short films and one feature film. A copy of this film, entitled Around the Pink House, disappeared in Yemen in 2000 under mysterious circumstances, on precisely the tenth anniversary of the unification of North and South Yemen. Hadjithomas and Joreige became intrigued about the incident because cinema is of hardly any significance in Yemen. They began a search for the truth about what had occurred, and recorded their experiences in EL FILM EL MAFKOUD. Among other things, it reveals how the pair are confronted with the image which exists of them in Yemen, and with they status they have as Arab filmmakers.

  • EL FILM EL MAFKOUD (THE LOST FILM) (2003)

  • EL FILM EL MAFKOUD (THE LOST FILM) (2003)

  • EL FILM EL MAFKOUD (THE LOST FILM) (2003)

  • EL FILM EL MAFKOUD (THE LOST FILM) (2003)

Rawi Hage

Rawi Hage

DEVELOPING AND THE UNDERDEVELOPED (1998)

In the view of Rawi Hage, little has changed in the former colonies. The colonial elite has simply been replaced by a national elite, which lives according to the same norms. Hage converted his critique into a series of photographs for which he had a number of wealthy Lebanese families pose with their domestic staff. In a glance one can see that class differences still exist. The maid in her uniform reminds one of colonial times and the gaudy interiors, which look like they came from a soap opera, seem to want to evoke the atmosphere of a colonial mansion.

Rawi Hage >>

  • DEVELOPING AND THE UNDERDEVELOPED (1998)

    In the view of Rawi Hage, little has changed in the former colonies. The colonial elite has simply been replaced by a national elite, which lives according to the same norms. Hage converted his critique into a series of photographs for which he had a number of wealthy Lebanese families pose with their domestic staff. In a glance one can see that class differences still exist. The maid in her uniform reminds one of colonial times and the gaudy interiors, which look like they came from a soap opera, seem to want to evoke the atmosphere of a colonial mansion.

  • DEVELOPING AND THE UNDERDEVELOPED (1998)

  • DEVELOPING AND THE UNDERDEVELOPED (1998)

  • DEVELOPING AND THE UNDERDEVELOPED (1998)

Rula Halawani

Rula Halawani

IRRATIONAL (2003)

Rula Halawani (Palestina, 1964) groeide op de Westelijke Jordaanoever op. Ze herinnert het zich als een gebied waar oude dorpjes versmolten met een prachtig heuvellandschap. Nu ziet ze vooral de lelijke bouwsels van Israëlische kolonisten. Met haar foto’s van de West Bank (IRRATIONAL) wil ze haar volk de kracht geven om te blijven dromen van een vredig Palestina. De aanwezigheid van de Israëli’s heeft ook de Palestijnse stad Ramallah onherkenbaar gemaakt. Op de dag van de Israëlische inval, de incursion, van 28 maart 2002 zag Halawani er straten die slechts werden bevolkt door Israëlische soldaten en tanks. De enige Palestijn die ze aantrof was een doodgeschoten oude man, wiens gezicht ze niet meer uit haar hoofd kon zetten. Ze vertaalde haar gevoel in NEGATIVE INCURSIONS, een serie in negatief afgedrukte foto’s van de inval in Ramallah.

Rula Halawani >>

  • IRRATIONAL (2003)

    Rula Halawani (Palestina, 1964) groeide op de Westelijke Jordaanoever op. Ze herinnert het zich als een gebied waar oude dorpjes versmolten met een prachtig heuvellandschap. Nu ziet ze vooral de lelijke bouwsels van Israëlische kolonisten. Met haar foto’s van de West Bank (IRRATIONAL) wil ze haar volk de kracht geven om te blijven dromen van een vredig Palestina. De aanwezigheid van de Israëli’s heeft ook de Palestijnse stad Ramallah onherkenbaar gemaakt. Op de dag van de Israëlische inval, de incursion, van 28 maart 2002 zag Halawani er straten die slechts werden bevolkt door Israëlische soldaten en tanks. De enige Palestijn die ze aantrof was een doodgeschoten oude man, wiens gezicht ze niet meer uit haar hoofd kon zetten. Ze vertaalde haar gevoel in NEGATIVE INCURSIONS, een serie in negatief afgedrukte foto’s van de inval in Ramallah.

  • IRRATIONAL (2003)

  • IRRATIONAL (2003)

  • NEGATIVE INCURSIONS (2002)

  • NEGATIVE INCURSIONS (2002)

Farida Hamak

Farida Hamak

TRACES OF THE WAR – DAHESH PALACE – BEIRUT – LEBANON (2003)

The civil war in Lebanon ended in 1989. To this day there are Shiite refugees living in the Dahesh palace, a place where they sought shelter during the hostilities. Farida Hamak did a photo essay on this forgotten community in Beirut who are not able to find an alternative to this once majestic but now long ago dilapidated palace. New generations grow up there, their elders breath their last there. The authorities would prefer to have their illegal guests, who have nowhere else to go, off their hands.

Farida Hamak >>

  • TRACES OF THE WAR – DAHESH PALACE – BEIRUT – LEBANON (2003)

    The civil war in Lebanon ended in 1989. To this day there are Shiite refugees living in the Dahesh palace, a place where they sought shelter during the hostilities. Farida Hamak did a photo essay on this forgotten community in Beirut who are not able to find an alternative to this once majestic but now long ago dilapidated palace. New generations grow up there, their elders breath their last there. The authorities would prefer to have their illegal guests, who have nowhere else to go, off their hands.

  • TRACES OF THE WAR – DAHESH PALACE – BEIRUT – LEBANON (2003)

  • TRACES OF THE WAR – DAHESH PALACE – BEIRUT – LEBANON (2003)

  • TRACES OF THE WAR – DAHESH PALACE – BEIRUT – LEBANON (2003)

  • TRACES OF THE WAR – DAHESH PALACE – BEIRUT – LEBANON (2003)

Noel Jabbour

Noel Jabbour

Noel Jabbour >>

Ahmed Jadallah

Ahmed Jadallah

HOME BASE GAZA (2003)

The Palestinian photojournalist Ahmed Jadallah has made over ten thousand photographs of life in the Gaza Strip for Reuters. Almost daily he shoots reportages of Palestinian funerals and Israeli violence. He himself was wounded four times and hospitalised in critical condition during the Israeli shelling of a Palestinian refugee camp in 2003 in which thirteen Palestinians were killed and several hundreds more wounded. Jadallah nearly lost his legs from a tank shell, and despite a number of operations his health is still not completely restored. The Israeli authorities also have barred him from going to Reuters’s main office in Jerusalem.

Ahmed Jadallah >>

  • HOME BASE GAZA (2003)

    The Palestinian photojournalist Ahmed Jadallah has made over ten thousand photographs of life in the Gaza Strip for Reuters. Almost daily he shoots reportages of Palestinian funerals and Israeli violence. He himself was wounded four times and hospitalised in critical condition during the Israeli shelling of a Palestinian refugee camp in 2003 in which thirteen Palestinians were killed and several hundreds more wounded. Jadallah nearly lost his legs from a tank shell, and despite a number of operations his health is still not completely restored. The Israeli authorities also have barred him from going to Reuters’s main office in Jerusalem.

  • HOME BASE GAZA (2003)

  • HOME BASE GAZA (2003)

  • HOME BASE GAZA (2003)

  • HOME BASE GAZA (2003)

Maha Maamoun

Maha Maamoun

CAIROSCAPES (2003)

Nature is present everywhere in the city, the Egyptian photographer Maha Maamoun testifies: not literally, but figuratively. For her series CAIROSCAPES she photographed the many dresses with floral motifs that are to be seen every day in the streets of Cairo. For Maamoun they are not only a surrogate for nature in an urban environment, but are also a point of rest in the midst of the violence of the city. CAIROSCAPES is constructed of panoramic photos, a form generally used for recording urban landscapes. By applying this at the mirco level, the photographs are not overviews, but intimate, and CAIROSCAPES takes on the fleeting nature of a glance.

Maha Maamoun >>

  • CAIROSCAPES (2003)

    Nature is present everywhere in the city, the Egyptian photographer Maha Maamoun testifies: not literally, but figuratively. For her series CAIROSCAPES she photographed the many dresses with floral motifs that are to be seen every day in the streets of Cairo. For Maamoun they are not only a surrogate for nature in an urban environment, but are also a point of rest in the midst of the violence of the city. CAIROSCAPES is constructed of panoramic photos, a form generally used for recording urban landscapes. By applying this at the mirco level, the photographs are not overviews, but intimate, and CAIROSCAPES takes on the fleeting nature of a glance.

  • CAIROSCAPES (2003)

  • CAIROSCAPES (2003)

Youssef Nabil

Youssef Nabil

SELECTED WORK (1993-2004)

Youssef Nabil (b. Egypt, 1972) grew up in the glory days of Egyptian cinema.His photographs are inspired by this world of glamour, elegance andmelodrama which was known as Hollywood on the Nile. Nabil photographscontemporary actors, singers and artists as the Egyptian film stars ofyesteryear. As a teenager Nabil liked the old technique of hand-colouring black and white photographs – which was still very common in Egypt. He decided to colour his images using that same technique in a contemporary way. In his work Nabil leaves room for buried drama: his portraits also play with the desire for immortality. Youssef Nabil learned his trade with photographers David Lachapelle in New York and Mario Testino in Paris. He sees his photographs as an encounter with the peoplehe loves.

Youssef Nabil >>

  • SELECTED WORK (1993-2004)

    Youssef Nabil (b. Egypt, 1972) grew up in the glory days of Egyptian cinema.
    His photographs are inspired by this world of glamour, elegance and
    melodrama which was known as Hollywood on the Nile. Nabil photographs
    contemporary actors, singers and artists as the Egyptian film stars of
    yesteryear. As a teenager Nabil liked the old technique of hand-colouring black and white photographs – which was still very common in Egypt. He decided to colour his images using that same technique in a contemporary way. In his work Nabil leaves room for buried drama: his portraits also play with the desire for immortality. Youssef Nabil learned his trade with photographers David Lachapelle in New York and Mario Testino in Paris. He sees his photographs as an encounter with the people
    he loves.

  • SELECTED WORK (1993-2004)

  • SELECTED WORK (1993-2004)

  • SELECTED WORK (1993-2004)

  • SELECTED WORK (1993-2004)

Mezgeen Aziz Rasheed

Mezgeen Aziz Rasheed

PHOTOCOLLAGES (1991-2001)

Although it was almost impossible to keep informed about international developments, Iraqi photography did not stand still under the regime of Saddam Hussein. A good example is Mezgeen Aziz Rasheed, born in 1962 and of Kurdish background. After the fall of Saddam it appeared that she had been making photo collages for ten years, which had even been shown in Iraq. A number of Italian photographers were so impressed with her work that they decided to introduce it to the West. Rasheed’s collages – scraps from dreams and nightmares – are comprised of portraits, images of greatly enlarged objects, letters, symbols, and other things. She expresses the problematic relationships between men and women, man and God, and men and power.

Mezgeen Aziz Rasheed >>

  • PHOTOCOLLAGES (1991-2001)

    Although it was almost impossible to keep informed about international developments, Iraqi photography did not stand still under the regime of Saddam Hussein. A good example is Mezgeen Aziz Rasheed, born in 1962 and of Kurdish background. After the fall of Saddam it appeared that she had been making photo collages for ten years, which had even been shown in Iraq. A number of Italian photographers were so impressed with her work that they decided to introduce it to the West. Rasheed’s collages – scraps from dreams and nightmares – are comprised of portraits, images of greatly enlarged objects, letters, symbols, and other things. She expresses the problematic relationships between men and women, man and God, and men and power.

  • PHOTOCOLLAGES (1991-2001)

  • PHOTOCOLLAGES (1991-2001)

  • PHOTOCOLLAGES (1991-2001)

  • PHOTOCOLLAGES (1991-2001)

Randa Shaath

Randa Shaath

UNDER THE SAME SKY: ROOFTOPS OF CAIRO (2003)

In traditional Cairo the roof was the place for relaxation. Families grew plants, kept pigeons or looked at the stars there. After 1920 the roof took on a new function. With the arrival of high-rise and apartment complexes the roof became the living quarters for cleaners and concierges. In the 1960s, after the fall of the monarchy and the nationalisation of considerable private property, a wave of migrants came from the countryside to the city. In the hope of a better life they joined others from their families who already lived on the roofs of Cairo. A rank growth of shanties on roofs was the result.

Randa Shaath >>

  • UNDER THE SAME SKY: ROOFTOPS OF CAIRO (2003)

    In traditional Cairo the roof was the place for relaxation. Families grew plants, kept pigeons or looked at the stars there. After 1920 the roof took on a new function. With the arrival of high-rise and apartment complexes the roof became the living quarters for cleaners and concierges. In the 1960s, after the fall of the monarchy and the nationalisation of considerable private property, a wave of migrants came from the countryside to the city. In the hope of a better life they joined others from their families who already lived on the roofs of Cairo. A rank growth of shanties on roofs was the result.

  • UNDER THE SAME SKY: ROOFTOPS OF CAIRO (2003)

  • UNDER THE SAME SKY: ROOFTOPS OF CAIRO (2003)

  • UNDER THE SAME SKY: ROOFTOPS OF CAIRO (2003)

  • UNDER THE SAME SKY: ROOFTOPS OF CAIRO (2003)

Anas Al-Shaikh

Anas Al-Shaikh

MEMORY OF MEMORIES (2001)

The installation MEMORY OF MEMORIES, made in an old garage in the Bahrain’s capital Manama, is a collage of personal and collective memories. In it Anas Al-Shaikh incorporates the dream he had as a child of a tree on which bananas, pears and grapes were all growing, that he interpreted as a symbol for doing things differently. He also incorporates masculine and feminine freedoms, and also photographs of armaments, which are reminders of the many wars in the Arab world, such as those between Iraq and Iran and Israel and Palestine. Anas Al-Shaikh visualises his sense of powerlessness in a photograph of four Arab men in front of a wall. ‘In our world we are not permitted to develop our own visions, ideas and skills,’ says the artist. ‘We are not permitted to decide what we will believe in.’

Anas Al-Shaikh >>

  • MEMORY OF MEMORIES (2001)

    The installation MEMORY OF MEMORIES, made in an old garage in the Bahrain’s capital Manama, is a collage of personal and collective memories. In it Anas Al-Shaikh incorporates the dream he had as a child of a tree on which bananas, pears and grapes were all growing, that he interpreted as a symbol for doing things differently. He also incorporates masculine and feminine freedoms, and also photographs of armaments, which are reminders of the many wars in the Arab world, such as those between Iraq and Iran and Israel and Palestine. Anas Al-Shaikh visualises his sense of powerlessness in a photograph of four Arab men in front of a wall. ‘In our world we are not permitted to develop our own visions, ideas and skills,’ says the artist. ‘We are not permitted to decide what we will believe in.’

  • MEMORY OF MEMORIES (2001)

  • MEMORY OF MEMORIES (2001)

  • MEMORY OF MEMORIES (2001)

  • MEMORY OF MEMORIES (2001)

Greta Torossian

Greta Torossian

REAL VISIONS (1999)

The Lebanese photographer Greta Torossian (b. 1969) is fascinated by urban landscapes. She asks herself what changes in them, what remains the same, and how these elements relate to each other. It is in that, according to her, that the soul, the personality of a city can be found. Torossian has a sharp eye for details. She sees how buildings are ordered, how colours and street furniture are used, and how small streets change into larger ones. Beirut, where she lives, produced an wealth of such observations. After the civil war, which had destroyed the whole of the city centre, the Lebanese capital became on of the greatest construction sites in the world. Seldom have the two extremes of human action – destruction and rebuilding – been so strongly united in one city. REAL VISIONS shows how the often classic ruins are swallowed up in modern urban planning and how a city gets a new personality through the merging of past and present.

Greta Torossian >>

  • REAL VISIONS (1999)

    The Lebanese photographer Greta Torossian (b. 1969) is fascinated by urban landscapes. She asks herself what changes in them, what remains the same, and how these elements relate to each other. It is in that, according to her, that the soul, the personality of a city can be found. Torossian has a sharp eye for details. She sees how buildings are ordered, how colours and street furniture are used, and how small streets change into larger ones. Beirut, where she lives, produced an wealth of such observations. After the civil war, which had destroyed the whole of the city centre, the Lebanese capital became on of the greatest construction sites in the world. Seldom have the two extremes of human action – destruction and rebuilding – been so strongly united in one city. REAL VISIONS shows how the often classic ruins are swallowed up in modern urban planning and how a city gets a new personality through the merging of past and present.

  • REAL VISIONS (1999)

  • REAL VISIONS (1999)

  • REAL VISIONS (1999)

  • REAL VISIONS (1999)

Issa Touma

Issa Touma

SUFI (1999)

Once each year the Sufi – adherents of a mystical branch of Islam – come together in a small village in the north of Syria. On this occasion, the day of Al-Ziyara, fifteen to twenty thousand men descend upon the poor and otherwise so tranquil village to honour the memory of the Sufi saint Al-Sheikh Abou Baker Al-Huwwari. The visitors bring money and gifts, and surrender themselves to song, dance, music and rituals. Statistics indicate that it is during this period that the most children are conceived in the village. The Sufi are a minority in Syria. With gatherings such as the day of Al-Ziyara they seek to strengthen their faith and emphasise their solidarity.

Issa Touma >>

  • SUFI (1999)

    Once each year the Sufi – adherents of a mystical branch of Islam – come together in a small village in the north of Syria. On this occasion, the day of Al-Ziyara, fifteen to twenty thousand men descend upon the poor and otherwise so tranquil village to honour the memory of the Sufi saint Al-Sheikh Abou Baker Al-Huwwari. The visitors bring money and gifts, and surrender themselves to song, dance, music and rituals. Statistics indicate that it is during this period that the most children are conceived in the village. The Sufi are a minority in Syria. With gatherings such as the day of Al-Ziyara they seek to strengthen their faith and emphasise their solidarity.

  • SUFI (1999)

  • SUFI (1999)

  • SUFI (1999)

  • SUFI (1999)

Nazar - A look back

Van Leo

Van Leo

PORTRAITS (circa 1950)

Van Leo was able to make ordinary people into film stars. In his studio in Cairo he sometimes took hours in order to impart an aura of glamour to his subjects. It was not the rendering of reality which was his goal, but the creation of the ultimate illusion. This made Van Leo the most popular photographer in Egypt.Van Leo, born in Turkey in 1921 as Leon Boyadjian, emigrated to Egypt at an early age with his Armenian parents. They settled in Cairo, a cosmopolitan city under British control, with a lively entertainment scene and a large international community.

Van Leo >>

  • PORTRAITS (circa 1950)

    Van Leo was able to make ordinary people into film stars. In his studio in Cairo he sometimes took hours in order to impart an aura of glamour to his subjects. It was not the rendering of reality which was his goal, but the creation of the ultimate illusion. This made Van Leo the most popular photographer in Egypt.
    Van Leo, born in Turkey in 1921 as Leon Boyadjian, emigrated to Egypt at an early age with his Armenian parents. They settled in Cairo, a cosmopolitan city under British control, with a lively entertainment scene and a large international community.

  • PORTRAITS (circa 1950)

    His fascination with photography and Hollywood stars led to Van Leo giving up his studies at the American university in Cairo and going to work as an assistant in a photo studio. When war broke out in 1940 and many military men wanted to send home a photo portrait, he seized his chance. Together with his brother he started a portrait studio in the artistic neighbourhood of Cairo, which thanks to Van Leo’s talent quickly became a success.

  • PORTRAITS (circa 1950)

    Van Leo’s clientele consisted of a mix of solders, performers, strippers and intellectuals. All wanted to appear as striking as possible in the photographic image, and it was precisely in that which Van Leo excelled. To achieve the desired result he worked with artificial light and shadow effects, rubbed Vaseline into the skin and used mirrors to create spots of light. If the image was still not perfect, Van Leo had no hesitation about retouching it.

  • PORTRAITS (circa 1950)

    In the 1940s and ‘50s Van Leo developed into the society photographer of Egypt. The photographer-gentleman threw himself into the nightlife and kept a range of mistresses. One sitter after another took their place in his portrait studio, from intellectuals like Taha Hussein to film actor Omar Sharif. But Van Leo preferred to work with unknown models whom he could transform into his favourite Hollywood stars, such as Ava Gardner and Elizabeth Taylor, without constraints of time or external interference.

  • PORTRAITS (circa 1950)

    With the end of British domination in 1952 the cosmopolitan life of Cairo also shut down. It became increasingly difficult for Van Leo to make his suggestive, Western oriented photographs. Many artists and photographers, including Van Leo’s brother, left for Europe. Van Leo himself decided to remain. He increasingly withdrew into his studio, the furnishings of which would continue as reminders of the flamboyant, pre-revolutionary Cairo.

  • PORTRAITS (circa 1950)

    Without an Egyptian upper class, there was little left for Van Leo to photograph. Out of fear for Islamic fundamentalists he burned his extensive collection of nudes. But his fame increased beyond the borders of Egypt. There followed exhibitions in countries such as France, Germany and Switzerland, and in 2000 he received the prestigious Prince Claus Award for his oeuvre.
    Later that year Van Leo died, at the age of eighty. According to papers around the world, with his death the glamour era of Cairo was definitively over.

Arab Image Foundation

Arab Image Foundation

PALESTINE BEFORE 1948 / MOROCCAN ALBUMS

The Arab Image Foundation (AIF) collects, conserves and shows work which Arab photographers have made of their own world. By its work, this institution, located in Beirut, hopes to counterbalance the image of the Arab world that exists in the West. The photographs from PALESTINE BEFORE 1948 and MOROCCAN ALBUMS are being seen for the first time in The Netherlands. The former series shows everyday life in Palestine before the proclamation of the state of Israel. Where the region today primarily affords images of misery, revolt and violence, the past tells a story of an open, cosmopolitan community living together without problems. MOROCCAN ALBUMS offers a series of intimate photographs taken in Morocco between 1900 and 1960, with the emphasis on tradition versus modernity.

Arab Image Foundation >>

  • PALESTINE BEFORE 1948 / MOROCCAN ALBUMS

    The Arab Image Foundation (AIF) collects, conserves and shows work which Arab photographers have made of their own world. By its work, this institution, located in Beirut, hopes to counterbalance the image of the Arab world that exists in the West. The photographs from PALESTINE BEFORE 1948 and MOROCCAN ALBUMS are being seen for the first time in The Netherlands. The former series shows everyday life in Palestine before the proclamation of the state of Israel. Where the region today primarily affords images of misery, revolt and violence, the past tells a story of an open, cosmopolitan community living together without problems. MOROCCAN ALBUMS offers a series of intimate photographs taken in Morocco between 1900 and 1960, with the emphasis on tradition versus modernity.

  • PALESTINE BEFORE 1948 / MOROCCAN ALBUMS

  • PALESTINE BEFORE 1948 / MOROCCAN ALBUMS

  • PALESTINE BEFORE 1948 / MOROCCAN ALBUMS

  • PALESTINE BEFORE 1948 / MOROCCAN ALBUMS

  • PALESTINE BEFORE 1948 / MOROCCAN ALBUMS

  • PALESTINE BEFORE 1948 / MOROCCAN ALBUMS

  • PALESTINE BEFORE 1948 / MOROCCAN ALBUMS

  • PALESTINE BEFORE 1948 / MOROCCAN ALBUMS

  • PALESTINE BEFORE 1948 / MOROCCAN ALBUMS

Lehnert & Landrock

Lehnert & Landrock

ORIENT (circa 1920)

At the beginning of the last century Lehnert & Landrock were famous for their photographs of the Arab world. In romantic images they captured a culture which was seen as pure and exotic, and that was at the point of disappearing. To this day books, calendars and post cards with work by Lehnert & Landrock are still being sold.

Lehnert & Landrock >>

  • ORIENT (circa 1920)

    At the beginning of the last century Lehnert & Landrock were famous for their photographs of the Arab world. In romantic images they captured a culture which was seen as pure and exotic, and that was at the point of disappearing. To this day books, calendars and post cards with work by Lehnert & Landrock are still being sold.

  • ORIENT (circa 1920)

  • ORIENT (circa 1920)

  • ORIENT (circa 1920)

  • ORIENT (circa 1920)

  • ORIENT (circa 1920)

Marc Garanger

Marc Garanger

FEMMES ALGERIENNES 1960 (1960)

The photographs which Marc Garanger took of Algerian women in 1960 have always been controversial. Garanger, at that time a military conscript stationed in Algeria, made them under orders of the French government, which had determined that all Algerians had to carry an ID card. The making of the identity photographs was accompanied with the requisite stress, since many woman had spent their whole adult life veiled. The result was a series of intimate photographs of faces from which the women’s discontent and anger can clearly be read. Although Garanger expressly attempted to record the beauty of Algerian women, his photographs led to angry reactions from viewers and critics at exhibitions.

Marc Garanger >>

  • FEMMES ALGERIENNES 1960 (1960)

    The photographs which Marc Garanger took of Algerian women in 1960 have always been controversial. Garanger, at that time a military conscript stationed in Algeria, made them under orders of the French government, which had determined that all Algerians had to carry an ID card. The making of the identity photographs was accompanied with the requisite stress, since many woman had spent their whole adult life veiled. The result was a series of intimate photographs of faces from which the women’s discontent and anger can clearly be read. Although Garanger expressly attempted to record the beauty of Algerian women, his photographs led to angry reactions from viewers and critics at exhibitions.

  • FEMMES ALGERIENNES 1960 (1960)

  • FEMMES ALGERIENNES 1960 (1960)

  • FEMMES ALGERIENNES 1960 (1960)

  • FEMMES ALGERIENNES 1960 (1960)

  • FEMMES ALGERIENNES 1960 (1960)

Kryn Taconis

Kryn Taconis

ALGERIAN CIVIL WAR (1957)

Kryn Taconis (b. Rotterdam, 1918) was the only Dutchman who has ever been a member of the legendary Magnum photo agency. He made his first photographs during the Second World War, in the course of producing false documents for the resistance. He also worked for the Underground Camera, a group of Dutch photographers who secretly recorded the German occupation. After joining Magnum in 1950, he want to Algeria in 1957 to photograph the activities of the FLN (Front de Liberation National) there. For two weeks the recorded the guerrilla war that the Algerian resistance movement conducted from the woods against the French colonialists.The FLN fought with weapons captured from the French. Good contacts in the countryside provided for sufficient food and clothing. During the time he was with them, the resistance group attacked a French convoy. According to the French radio eight guerrillas were killed in the action, while in reality no one was even wounded.

Kryn Taconis >>

  • ALGERIAN CIVIL WAR (1957)

    Kryn Taconis (b. Rotterdam, 1918) was the only Dutchman who has ever been a member of the legendary Magnum photo agency. He made his first photographs during the Second World War, in the course of producing false documents for the resistance. He also worked for the Underground Camera, a group of Dutch photographers who secretly recorded the German occupation. After joining Magnum in 1950, he want to Algeria in 1957 to photograph the activities of the FLN (Front de Liberation National) there. For two weeks the recorded the guerrilla war that the Algerian resistance movement conducted from the woods against the French colonialists.
    The FLN fought with weapons captured from the French. Good contacts in the countryside provided for sufficient food and clothing. During the time he was with them, the resistance group attacked a French convoy. According to the French radio eight guerrillas were killed in the action, while in reality no one was even wounded.

  • ALGERIAN CIVIL WAR (1957)

  • ALGERIAN CIVIL WAR (1957)

  • ALGERIAN CIVIL WAR (1957)

  • ALGERIAN CIVIL WAR (1957)

Nazar - Western eyes

Abbas

Abbas

YA SADDAM (2003)

The phrase YA SADDAM is part of the slogan ‘With my blood, with my soul I follow you, O Saddam!’ With his series of photographs under this title Abbas reveals the tragic dialogue between a brutal dictator and his subjects. Saddam Hussein bombarded his people with self-portraits in order to prompt them to veneration and submission. After his fall the images were used by that same people in order to express the hate and rage that had built up through the years of oppression: the photographs were ripped from the wall, murals smeared, and statues decapitated.

Abbas >>

  • YA SADDAM (2003)

    The phrase YA SADDAM is part of the slogan ‘With my blood, with my soul I follow you, O Saddam!’ With his series of photographs under this title Abbas reveals the tragic dialogue between a brutal dictator and his subjects. Saddam Hussein bombarded his people with self-portraits in order to prompt them to veneration and submission. After his fall the images were used by that same people in order to express the hate and rage that had built up through the years of oppression: the photographs were ripped from the wall, murals smeared, and statues decapitated.

  • YA SADDAM (2003)

Jean-François Baumard

Jean-François Baumard

HAMMAM (1994-1997)

If in the West the steam bath is a symbol of luxury, in the Eastern world it is a place of meditation. In Islamic lands the Turkish bath (the hammam) is traditionally linked with the daily visit to the mosque, for which the body and spirit must be pure. For Islamic women it is also a meeting place where they can exchange the latest gossip. For the men – who have enough other places where they can meet one another – it is on the contrary a place of rest and reflection. The French photographer Jean-François Baumard recorded the ritual for men in a number of bathhouses in Tunisia. He photographed the visitors sunk in thought while they prepared themselves for their visit to the mosque. The steam fogged up Baumard’s lens, which reinforces the mystic character of the photographs.

Jean-François Baumard >>

  • HAMMAM (1994-1997)

    If in the West the steam bath is a symbol of luxury, in the Eastern world it is a place of meditation. In Islamic lands the Turkish bath (the hammam) is traditionally linked with the daily visit to the mosque, for which the body and spirit must be pure. For Islamic women it is also a meeting place where they can exchange the latest gossip. For the men – who have enough other places where they can meet one another – it is on the contrary a place of rest and reflection. The French photographer Jean-François Baumard recorded the ritual for men in a number of bathhouses in Tunisia. He photographed the visitors sunk in thought while they prepared themselves for their visit to the mosque. The steam fogged up Baumard’s lens, which reinforces the mystic character of the photographs.

  • HAMMAM (1994-1997)

  • HAMMAM (1994-1997)

  • HAMMAM (1994-1997)

  • HAMMAM (1994-1997)

Paul Blackmore

Paul Blackmore

BEIRUT (2002)

According to Paul Blackmore, there is no other people who know as well as the Lebanese how cities rise and fall. After sixteen years of civil war the name of Beirut was synonymous with death, violence and destruction. When a peace was finally signed in 1990, there were only ruins left. The Lebanese capital, which had been known for its toleration and culture, had been changed into a hell on earth. One third of the population had fled and hundreds of thousands of residents had been killed. In the decade which followed the one-and-a-half million residents of Beirut worked hard on rebuilding the city. Twelve years later Blackmore photographed a city which has literally arisen from the ashes.

Paul Blackmore >>

  • BEIRUT (2002)

    According to Paul Blackmore, there is no other people who know as well as the Lebanese how cities rise and fall. After sixteen years of civil war the name of Beirut was synonymous with death, violence and destruction. When a peace was finally signed in 1990, there were only ruins left. The Lebanese capital, which had been known for its toleration and culture, had been changed into a hell on earth. One third of the population had fled and hundreds of thousands of residents had been killed. In the decade which followed the one-and-a-half million residents of Beirut worked hard on rebuilding the city. Twelve years later Blackmore photographed a city which has literally arisen from the ashes.

  • BEIRUT (2002)

  • BEIRUT (2002)

  • BEIRUT (2002)

  • BEIRUT (2002)

Alison Bradley

Alison Bradley

BAZAARS OF THE OLD LEVANT (1999-2000)

Everything comes together in the bazaar: the small shops, the great trade routes, the ancient streets, the exchange of ideas and goods, the encounter between East and West. The American photographer Alison Bradley went in search of the bazaars of the old Levant (the coasts of Asia Minor, Syria and Egypt) and discovered the roofed markets of Aleppo, Cairo, Damascus, Istanbul and Jerusalem. She produced an atmospheric visual report on these traditional trading centres which still form the heart of Arab society, but are only rarely photographed. In order to emphasise the historical character of her search, Bradley worked with techniques that reach back to the first photographers who were active in the Middle East.

Alison Bradley >>

  • BAZAARS OF THE OLD LEVANT (1999-2000)

    Everything comes together in the bazaar: the small shops, the great trade routes, the ancient streets, the exchange of ideas and goods, the encounter between East and West. The American photographer Alison Bradley went in search of the bazaars of the old Levant (the coasts of Asia Minor, Syria and Egypt) and discovered the roofed markets of Aleppo, Cairo, Damascus, Istanbul and Jerusalem. She produced an atmospheric visual report on these traditional trading centres which still form the heart of Arab society, but are only rarely photographed. In order to emphasise the historical character of her search, Bradley worked with techniques that reach back to the first photographers who were active in the Middle East.

  • BAZAARS OF THE OLD LEVANT (1999-2000)

  • BAZAARS OF THE OLD LEVANT (1999-2000)

  • BAZAARS OF THE OLD LEVANT (1999-2000)

  • BAZAARS OF THE OLD LEVANT (1999-2000)

Matthias Bruggmann

Matthias Bruggmann

IRAK (2003)

The Swiss photographer Matthias Bruggmann (b. France, 1978) comes from a family of politicians and diplomats. With this background, at an early age he became engaged with world politics and grew up with a feeling of guilt for the inadequacies of diplomacy in preventing wars and conflicts. He sees his photography as a means of showing the violence of war to the world, and in this way hopes to take a more active role in opposing it than diplomats can have, often bound as they are by rules and conventions. He sums up the war in Iraq, which Bruggmann photographed without interference from the American and British troops, as a conflict between ‘frightened, badly trained teenagers with rifles who are defending one of the oldest civilisations in the world against a group of frightened, badly trained teenagers with great firepower and a leader who had almost no conception of the consequences of his acts.’

Matthias Bruggmann >>

  • IRAK (2003)

    The Swiss photographer Matthias Bruggmann (b. France, 1978) comes from a family of politicians and diplomats. With this background, at an early age he became engaged with world politics and grew up with a feeling of guilt for the inadequacies of diplomacy in preventing wars and conflicts. He sees his photography as a means of showing the violence of war to the world, and in this way hopes to take a more active role in opposing it than diplomats can have, often bound as they are by rules and conventions. He sums up the war in Iraq, which Bruggmann photographed without interference from the American and British troops, as a conflict between ‘frightened, badly trained teenagers with rifles who are defending one of the oldest civilisations in the world against a group of frightened, badly trained teenagers with great firepower and a leader who had almost no conception of the consequences of his acts.’

  • IRAK (2003)

  • IRAK (2003)

  • IRAK (2003)

  • IRAK (2003)

Denis Dailleux

Denis Dailleux

LE CAIRE (1995-2000)

The French photographer Denis Dailleux has, as he himself admits, a love affair with Cairo. He is fascinated by its atmosphere, the variety of colours and the beauty of the residents of Egypt’s capital city. He discovered the city as a child and since then can be found there regularly. In LE CAIRE he provides an image of daily life in Cairo. In warm, bright colours and deep contrasts in black and white, he reports on his encounters in the streets and cafes, at weddings and in barbershops. His photographic ode to Cairo has been collected in the book Le Caire, with which he won the Fuji Film Prize at the Biarritz photo festival in 2001.

Denis Dailleux >>

  • LE CAIRE (1995-2000)

    The French photographer Denis Dailleux has, as he himself admits, a love affair with Cairo. He is fascinated by its atmosphere, the variety of colours and the beauty of the residents of Egypt’s capital city. He discovered the city as a child and since then can be found there regularly. In LE CAIRE he provides an image of daily life in Cairo. In warm, bright colours and deep contrasts in black and white, he reports on his encounters in the streets and cafes, at weddings and in barbershops. His photographic ode to Cairo has been collected in the book Le Caire, with which he won the Fuji Film Prize at the Biarritz photo festival in 2001.

  • LE CAIRE (1995-2000)

  • LE CAIRE (1995-2000)

  • LE CAIRE (1995-2000)

  • LE CAIRE (1995-2000)

  • LE CAIRE (1995-2000)

Wouter Deruytter

Wouter Deruytter

ARABIAN KNIGHTS (1996-1998)

How current is the image of the Arab sheikh? The romantic idea of the prince of the desert on his Arabian stallion lives on in Hollywood, but the contemporary sheikh has long since taken to travelling around in a white Rolls Royce. The Flemish photographer Wouter Deruytter was permitted unique access to the very closed Arab palace culture, which generally is accessible only for family members. He recorded the community of businessmen who have become rich on oil, surrounded by their Western paraphernalia. But behind this modern façade lies the traditional Arab for whom the performance of his race horses still matters more than the closing prices on Wall Street.

Wouter Deruytter >>

  • ARABIAN KNIGHTS (1996-1998)

    How current is the image of the Arab sheikh? The romantic idea of the prince of the desert on his Arabian stallion lives on in Hollywood, but the contemporary sheikh has long since taken to travelling around in a white Rolls Royce. The Flemish photographer Wouter Deruytter was permitted unique access to the very closed Arab palace culture, which generally is accessible only for family members. He recorded the community of businessmen who have become rich on oil, surrounded by their Western paraphernalia. But behind this modern façade lies the traditional Arab for whom the performance of his race horses still matters more than the closing prices on Wall Street.

  • ARABIAN KNIGHTS (1996-1998)

  • ARABIAN KNIGHTS (1996-1998)

  • ARABIAN KNIGHTS (1996-1998)

  • ARABIAN KNIGHTS (1996-1998)

Michael von Graffenried

Michael von Graffenried

INSIDE ALGERIA (1991-1998)

From 1991 to 1998 the Swiss photographer Michael von Graffenried produced an extensive photographic report on the civil war in Algeria. Because Islamic terrorists had already murdered more than 60 journalists and photographers, he worked with a hidden camera. He shot his photographs from the hip, without looking through the lens. That has made INSIDE ALGERIA a very realistic report of everyday life in a country that is being torn apart by conflict, with on the one side supporters of an Islamic state and on the other supporters of democracy. Recently Von Graffenried returned to Algeria. He visited people whom he had previously photographed and recorded their stories on video under the title GUERRE SANS IMAGES.

Michael von Graffenried >>

  • INSIDE ALGERIA (1991-1998)

    From 1991 to 1998 the Swiss photographer Michael von Graffenried produced an extensive photographic report on the civil war in Algeria. Because Islamic terrorists had already murdered more than 60 journalists and photographers, he worked with a hidden camera. He shot his photographs from the hip, without looking through the lens. That has made INSIDE ALGERIA a very realistic report of everyday life in a country that is being torn apart by conflict, with on the one side supporters of an Islamic state and on the other supporters of democracy. Recently Von Graffenried returned to Algeria. He visited people whom he had previously photographed and recorded their stories on video under the title GUERRE SANS IMAGES.

  • INSIDE ALGERIA (1991-1998)

  • INSIDE ALGERIA (1991-1998)

  • INSIDE ALGERIA (1991-1998)

  • INSIDE ALGERIA (1991-1998)

Mansoora Hassan

Mansoora Hassan

THE BURQA PROJECT 911 (2001-2003)

Photographer and visual artist Mansoora Hassan was born in Pakistan and lives in Egypt. She is a member of the board of directors for various American art institutions and has participated in more than fifty exhibitions all over the world. In her confrontational BURQA PROJECT 911 she combines icons of the Eastern and Western world. Hassan photographed herself in a burka in front of American monuments such as the Capitol, the Lincoln Memorial and Ground Zero. The result is to be seen as a commentary on the dogmas of Islam, on retaining one’s own identity in cosmopolitan cities and on the limitations on individual freedom in the context of the hunt on terrorists. At a more personal level the photographs deal with the mysterious aura of the burka, an item of clothing that enables someone to see without being seen. On the basis of THE BURQA PROJECT 911 Mansoora Hassan was interrogated by the FBI.

Mansoora Hassan >>

  • THE BURQA PROJECT 911 (2001-2003)

    Photographer and visual artist Mansoora Hassan was born in Pakistan and lives in Egypt. She is a member of the board of directors for various American art institutions and has participated in more than fifty exhibitions all over the world. In her confrontational BURQA PROJECT 911 she combines icons of the Eastern and Western world. Hassan photographed herself in a burka in front of American monuments such as the Capitol, the Lincoln Memorial and Ground Zero. The result is to be seen as a commentary on the dogmas of Islam, on retaining one’s own identity in cosmopolitan cities and on the limitations on individual freedom in the context of the hunt on terrorists. At a more personal level the photographs deal with the mysterious aura of the burka, an item of clothing that enables someone to see without being seen. On the basis of THE BURQA PROJECT 911 Mansoora Hassan was interrogated by the FBI.

  • THE BURQA PROJECT 911 (2001-2003)

  • THE BURQA PROJECT 911 (2001-2003)

  • THE BURQA PROJECT 911 (2001-2003)

  • THE BURQA PROJECT 911 (2001-2003)

Gaston Zvi Ickovicz

Gaston Zvi Ickovicz

SETTLEMENT (2002-2004) / MONUMENT (2002-2004)

For the SETTLEMENT series Gaston Zvi Ickowicz travelled around on the West Bank for two years. He photographed the houses, roads and other structures of the Israeli colonists, who themselves make little use of them because their life is lived predominately in Israel. For MONUMENT Ickowicz focused on the wall that Israel had constructed in the same area in 2002 out of fear of attacks by Palestinians. On the Israeli side the wall is painted in an attempt to have it blend into the landscape; on the Palestinian side it is left as raw concrete. Ickowicz shot both series at some distance to show how the structures clash with their surroundings. In his eyes the Israeli colonist is an intruder who refashions nature for his own ends and in doing so disrupts the landscape and the lives of the original residents.

Gaston Zvi Ickovicz >>

  • SETTLEMENT (2002-2004) / MONUMENT (2002-2004)

    For the SETTLEMENT series Gaston Zvi Ickowicz travelled around on the West Bank for two years. He photographed the houses, roads and other structures of the Israeli colonists, who themselves make little use of them because their life is lived predominately in Israel. For MONUMENT Ickowicz focused on the wall that Israel had constructed in the same area in 2002 out of fear of attacks by Palestinians. On the Israeli side the wall is painted in an attempt to have it blend into the landscape; on the Palestinian side it is left as raw concrete. Ickowicz shot both series at some distance to show how the structures clash with their surroundings. In his eyes the Israeli colonist is an intruder who refashions nature for his own ends and in doing so disrupts the landscape and the lives of the original residents.

  • SETTLEMENT (2002-2004) / MONUMENT (2002-2004)

  • SETTLEMENT (2002-2004) / MONUMENT (2002-2004)

  • SETTLEMENT (2002-2004) / MONUMENT (2002-2004)

  • SETTLEMENT (2002-2004) / MONUMENT (2002-2004)

Barry Iverson

Barry Iverson

EGYPT (1993)

The American Barry Iverson (b. 1956) has worked for prominent publications such as Life, People, The New York Times, Stern, Paris Match and National Geographic. He has specialised in the Middle East, and has photographed world news such as the assassination of Sadat, the civil war in Chad and the First Gulf War. Many prominent figures from the region, such as King Abdullah of Jordan and president Mubarak of Egypt, through the Egyptian actor Omar Sharif, have posed for him. Iverson operates from Cairo and has a strong interest in Egyptian history. He has photographed various excavations, including the tomb of the son of Ramses II, and had documented the erosion of the pyramids photographically. He also played an important role in rescuing the archive of the Egyptian photographer Van Leo. In his sepia and hand coloured photographs – a reference to the historical picture post card – Iverson honours the monumental past of Egypt and other Arab countries.

Barry Iverson >>

  • EGYPT (1993)

    The American Barry Iverson (b. 1956) has worked for prominent publications such as Life, People, The New York Times, Stern, Paris Match and National Geographic. He has specialised in the Middle East, and has photographed world news such as the assassination of Sadat, the civil war in Chad and the First Gulf War. Many prominent figures from the region, such as King Abdullah of Jordan and president Mubarak of Egypt, through the Egyptian actor Omar Sharif, have posed for him. Iverson operates from Cairo and has a strong interest in Egyptian history. He has photographed various excavations, including the tomb of the son of Ramses II, and had documented the erosion of the pyramids photographically. He also played an important role in rescuing the archive of the Egyptian photographer Van Leo. In his sepia and hand coloured photographs – a reference to the historical picture post card – Iverson honours the monumental past of Egypt and other Arab countries.

  • EGYPT (1993)

  • EGYPT (1993)

  • EGYPT (1993)

  • EGYPT (1993)

Monique Jacot

Monique Jacot

A JOUR (2000)

Monique Jacot >>

  • A JOUR (2000)

  • A JOUR (2000)

  • A JOUR (2000)

  • A JOUR (2000)

  • A JOUR (2000)

Laura Junka

Laura Junka

HAPPY IN GAZA (2003)

What do Palestinians from the Gaza Strip do during their vacation? Laura Junka asked herself that question during her study at the photo academy in Jerusalem. So she went to Gaza to record what people who are confronted with war and misery every day do in their free time. For instance, she went camping with the Abdoullah family, who thanks to a cease fire can go swimming in the sea for the first time in three years. HAPPY IN GAZA is a protest against the militant image of the Palestinian. Junka portrays the search for happiness as an act of resistance against the violence that has become an everyday event in the Gaza Strip.

Laura Junka >>

  • HAPPY IN GAZA (2003)

    What do Palestinians from the Gaza Strip do during their vacation? Laura Junka asked herself that question during her study at the photo academy in Jerusalem. So she went to Gaza to record what people who are confronted with war and misery every day do in their free time. For instance, she went camping with the Abdoullah family, who thanks to a cease fire can go swimming in the sea for the first time in three years. HAPPY IN GAZA is a protest against the militant image of the Palestinian. Junka portrays the search for happiness as an act of resistance against the violence that has become an everyday event in the Gaza Strip.

  • HAPPY IN GAZA (2003)

  • HAPPY IN GAZA (2003)

  • HAPPY IN GAZA (2003)

  • HAPPY IN GAZA (2003)

  • HAPPY IN GAZA (2003)

  • HAPPY IN GAZA (2003)

  • HAPPY IN GAZA (2003)

Ed Kashi

Ed Kashi

JOIN US: MODERN ARABS (1992-2003)

An American photojournalist with Jewish roots, Ed Kashi has specialised in recording social and political relationships in the world. He photographs in both the East and West, and has done reportage in Ireland, Peru, Poland and America. JOIN US: MODERN ARABS has been assembled from the many series that Kashi has made on modern, daily life in the Arab world. For example, he portrayed the new Beirut, which has re-arisen miraculously after the long civil war there. In Kuwait – fashion capital of the Middle East – she shot a fashion report that shows that not all Arab women go through life hidden behind veils. As ever, Kashi has a sharp eye for the differences between past and present and between rich and poor. He visits both fashion shows and refugee camps and mixes equally easily with Hezbollah fighters and members of Arab high society.

Ed Kashi >>

  • JOIN US: MODERN ARABS (1992-2003)

    An American photojournalist with Jewish roots, Ed Kashi has specialised in recording social and political relationships in the world. He photographs in both the East and West, and has done reportage in Ireland, Peru, Poland and America. JOIN US: MODERN ARABS has been assembled from the many series that Kashi has made on modern, daily life in the Arab world. For example, he portrayed the new Beirut, which has re-arisen miraculously after the long civil war there. In Kuwait – fashion capital of the Middle East – she shot a fashion report that shows that not all Arab women go through life hidden behind veils. As ever, Kashi has a sharp eye for the differences between past and present and between rich and poor. He visits both fashion shows and refugee camps and mixes equally easily with Hezbollah fighters and members of Arab high society.

  • JOIN US: MODERN ARABS (1992-2003)

  • JOIN US: MODERN ARABS (1992-2003)

  • JOIN US: MODERN ARABS (1992-2003)

  • JOIN US: MODERN ARABS (1992-2003)

Thomas Kneubühler

Thomas Kneubühler

BAGHDAD (MEDIATED) (1995-2004)

In the mid-1990s artist Thomas Kneubühler spent two weeks in Baghdad. It struck him that his own experiences did not square with the image that he had been presented with by Western media. Rather than doing a photo report himself, he decided to investigate how the Iraqis present themselves in the media. Kneubühler visited Iraqi cinemas, photo shops and museums, and studied programmes on Iraqi television. He collected images, made photographs of them himself, and had his own portrait done by an Iraqi street photographer. The result is the installation BAGHDAD (MEDIATED), constructed of photographs and a presentation on video.

Thomas Kneubühler >>

  • BAGHDAD (MEDIATED) (1995-2004)

    In the mid-1990s artist Thomas Kneubühler spent two weeks in Baghdad. It struck him that his own experiences did not square with the image that he had been presented with by Western media. Rather than doing a photo report himself, he decided to investigate how the Iraqis present themselves in the media. Kneubühler visited Iraqi cinemas, photo shops and museums, and studied programmes on Iraqi television. He collected images, made photographs of them himself, and had his own portrait done by an Iraqi street photographer. The result is the installation BAGHDAD (MEDIATED), constructed of photographs and a presentation on video.

  • BAGHDAD (MEDIATED) (1995-2004)

  • BAGHDAD (MEDIATED) (1995-2004)

  • BAGHDAD (MEDIATED) (1995-2004)

  • BAGHDAD (MEDIATED) (1995-2004)

Zbigniew Kosc

Zbigniew Kosc

ISLAMIC CAIRO (1992-2002)

Islamic Cairo is an historic area of the city, surrounded by medieval walls, which in earlier times was regarded as the cultural, intellectual and religious centre of the Arab world. There are still monumental palaces and mosques to be found there – and also the oldest university in the world. At the same time, it is an urban area in decline, infested with ruins and stinking alleys in which the poorest inhabitants of Cairo try to sell their merchandise.

Zbigniew Kosc >>

  • ISLAMIC CAIRO (1992-2002)

    Islamic Cairo is an historic area of the city, surrounded by medieval walls, which in earlier times was regarded as the cultural, intellectual and religious centre of the Arab world. There are still monumental palaces and mosques to be found there – and also the oldest university in the world. At the same time, it is an urban area in decline, infested with ruins and stinking alleys in which the poorest inhabitants of Cairo try to sell their merchandise.

  • ISLAMIC CAIRO (1992-2002)

  • ISLAMIC CAIRO (1992-2002)

  • ISLAMIC CAIRO (1992-2002)

Jeroen Kramer

Jeroen Kramer

SUNNI TRIANGLE (2003)

The Sunni Triangle is inhabited by supporters of Saddam Hussein, who as a Sunni Moslem favoured his fellow Sunnis politically and economically. Because of the hate against the Americans and fear for Shiite domination, the region is the most dangerous in Iraq. For forty-eight hours the Dutch photographer Jeroen Kramer accompanied the 124th Brigade, from Miami, Florida, on patrol, who are responsible for security in the Triangle. For tactical reasons he was not permitted to use his flash. The Brigade has the same routine almost every day. Bombs along the roads are disarmed, snipers on the roof try to keep the rebels at bay, and the rockets fired at their Humvees must be answered with counter barrages. Although the shelling sometimes lasts for half an hour, it often remains unclear if anyone has really been hit.

Jeroen Kramer >>

  • SUNNI TRIANGLE (2003)

    The Sunni Triangle is inhabited by supporters of Saddam Hussein, who as a Sunni Moslem favoured his fellow Sunnis politically and economically. Because of the hate against the Americans and fear for Shiite domination, the region is the most dangerous in Iraq. For forty-eight hours the Dutch photographer Jeroen Kramer accompanied the 124th Brigade, from Miami, Florida, on patrol, who are responsible for security in the Triangle. For tactical reasons he was not permitted to use his flash. The Brigade has the same routine almost every day. Bombs along the roads are disarmed, snipers on the roof try to keep the rebels at bay, and the rockets fired at their Humvees must be answered with counter barrages. Although the shelling sometimes lasts for half an hour, it often remains unclear if anyone has really been hit.

  • SUNNI TRIANGLE (2003)

  • SUNNI TRIANGLE (2003)

  • SUNNI TRIANGLE (2003)

  • SUNNI TRIANGLE (2003)

Benjamin Lowy

Benjamin Lowy

PREEMPTIVE WAR (2003)

The photographer – or as he calls himself, journalist, artist and story-teller – Benjamin Lowy stayed in Iraq for seven months to document the American invasion. He was embedded with American military units, mixed with the Iraqi people and underwent a mortar attack at an American base in Kuwait. It was not unusual for Lowy to make his photographs with trembling hands or tear-filled eyes. What affected him most was a Shiite family’s discovery in a mass grave of a number of family members who had been executed in 1991 by Saddam Hussein’s regime. Only after several other excavations was Lowy able to sufficiently regain control of his emotions that he could again photograph.

Benjamin Lowy >>

  • PREEMPTIVE WAR (2003)

    The photographer – or as he calls himself, journalist, artist and story-teller – Benjamin Lowy stayed in Iraq for seven months to document the American invasion. He was embedded with American military units, mixed with the Iraqi people and underwent a mortar attack at an American base in Kuwait. It was not unusual for Lowy to make his photographs with trembling hands or tear-filled eyes. What affected him most was a Shiite family’s discovery in a mass grave of a number of family members who had been executed in 1991 by Saddam Hussein’s regime. Only after several other excavations was Lowy able to sufficiently regain control of his emotions that he could again photograph.

  • PREEMPTIVE WAR (2003)

  • PREEMPTIVE WAR (2003)

  • PREEMPTIVE WAR (2003)

  • PREEMPTIVE WAR (2003)

Diana Matar

Diana Matar

VEILED WOMAN IN CAIRO (2002-2004)

Because of increasing globalisation, symbols spread quickly to all corners of the world, where they are interpreted in various manners. For instance, in the West the Islamic headscarf often stands for oppression and backwardness, while in the Arab world the scarf is a symbol of religious devotion. But even among Arabs the meaning of the headscarf is not unambiguous. Many older women experience its rejection as a sign of active participation in modern society, while many younger women wear the scarf – certainly after September 11 – as a symbol of mutual solidarity.

Diana Matar >>

  • VEILED WOMAN IN CAIRO (2002-2004)

    Because of increasing globalisation, symbols spread quickly to all corners of the world, where they are interpreted in various manners. For instance, in the West the Islamic headscarf often stands for oppression and backwardness, while in the Arab world the scarf is a symbol of religious devotion. But even among Arabs the meaning of the headscarf is not unambiguous. Many older women experience its rejection as a sign of active participation in modern society, while many younger women wear the scarf – certainly after September 11 – as a symbol of mutual solidarity.

  • VEILED WOMAN IN CAIRO (2002-2004)

  • VEILED WOMAN IN CAIRO (2002-2004)

  • VEILED WOMAN IN CAIRO (2002-2004)

  • VEILED WOMAN IN CAIRO (2002-2004)

Annette den Ouden

Annette den Ouden

INARA (2002-2004)

In INARA Annette den Ouden wishes to combat the collective anxiety about Islam that she believes Western governments are cultivating. Particularly the conservative America of George Bush avails itself of terms like ‘Moslem fundamentalist’, ‘axis of evil’ and ‘war on terror’ in an effort to stir up a sense of anxiety among its citizens. Den Ouden wanted to experience for herself how justified this fear is, and travelled with her camera through countries like Iraq, Jordan and Lebanon. She recorded the daily life of the Islamic world, which appears to be far from as threatening as is often suggested in the West. She entitled her series INARA, Arabic for ‘enlightenment’. ‘Because of the insight that I obtained for myself, and hope to convey to others,’ explains the photographer, who works for publications including de Volkskrant, Het Parool and NRC Handelsblad.

Annette den Ouden >>

  • INARA (2002-2004)

    In INARA Annette den Ouden wishes to combat the collective anxiety about Islam that she believes Western governments are cultivating. Particularly the conservative America of George Bush avails itself of terms like ‘Moslem fundamentalist’, ‘axis of evil’ and ‘war on terror’ in an effort to stir up a sense of anxiety among its citizens. Den Ouden wanted to experience for herself how justified this fear is, and travelled with her camera through countries like Iraq, Jordan and Lebanon. She recorded the daily life of the Islamic world, which appears to be far from as threatening as is often suggested in the West. She entitled her series INARA, Arabic for ‘enlightenment’. ‘Because of the insight that I obtained for myself, and hope to convey to others,’ explains the photographer, who works for publications including de Volkskrant, Het Parool and NRC Handelsblad.

  • INARA (2002-2004)

  • INARA (2002-2004)

  • INARA (2002-2004)

Max Pam

Max Pam

RAMADAN IN YEMEN (1993)

As a twenty year old hippie the adventurer Max Pam (b. Australia, 1949) travelled from Calcutta to London. That has been followed by a life full of journeys, through India, Pakistan, Nepal, Ethiopia and his homeland Australia, among other places. From the beginning Pam recorded his adventures in writing and in photos. That was also the case for the trip he made through Yemen during the month of Ramadan in 1993. Like the populace, he fasted by day and only began to eat after sundown. In the meantime he made notes on the desert, the architecture, the chewing of khat, the very present men and the women hidden behind black fabric. The latter gazed at him, as he himself wrote, ‘penetratingly with their sexy black eyes.’

Max Pam >>

  • RAMADAN IN YEMEN (1993)

    As a twenty year old hippie the adventurer Max Pam (b. Australia, 1949) travelled from Calcutta to London. That has been followed by a life full of journeys, through India, Pakistan, Nepal, Ethiopia and his homeland Australia, among other places. From the beginning Pam recorded his adventures in writing and in photos. That was also the case for the trip he made through Yemen during the month of Ramadan in 1993. Like the populace, he fasted by day and only began to eat after sundown. In the meantime he made notes on the desert, the architecture, the chewing of khat, the very present men and the women hidden behind black fabric. The latter gazed at him, as he himself wrote, ‘penetratingly with their sexy black eyes.’

  • RAMADAN IN YEMEN (1993)

  • RAMADAN IN YEMEN (1993)

  • RAMADAN IN YEMEN (1993)

  • RAMADAN IN YEMEN (1993)

Paolo Pellegrin

Paolo Pellegrin

LIBYA (2002)

The Libyan leader Khadaffi – who has been in power for 33 years now – has the reputation of being ‘the mad dog of the Middle East’, as he was called by Ronald Reagan. He is alleged to have been involved in the bombing of a passenger aeroplane over Lockerby and in the production of weapons of mass destruction. But the Khadaffi of today poses as a diplomat and tries to bring reconciliation between the Palestinians and Israelis. Together with the West he struggles against Al-Qaida, and he wants to transform the Arab world into a sort of European Union. Paolo Pellegrin portrays the Tripoli (Libya’s capital) of today, which reflects the combination of the traditional and modern dictated by Khadaffi. He also photographed Khadaffi himself, a man whose sincerity is still in doubt.

Paolo Pellegrin >>

  • LIBYA (2002)

    The Libyan leader Khadaffi – who has been in power for 33 years now – has the reputation of being ‘the mad dog of the Middle East’, as he was called by Ronald Reagan. He is alleged to have been involved in the bombing of a passenger aeroplane over Lockerby and in the production of weapons of mass destruction. But the Khadaffi of today poses as a diplomat and tries to bring reconciliation between the Palestinians and Israelis. Together with the West he struggles against Al-Qaida, and he wants to transform the Arab world into a sort of European Union. Paolo Pellegrin portrays the Tripoli (Libya’s capital) of today, which reflects the combination of the traditional and modern dictated by Khadaffi. He also photographed Khadaffi himself, a man whose sincerity is still in doubt.

  • LIBYA (2002)

  • LIBYA (2002)

  • LIBYA (2002)

Reza

Reza

LIBYAN WOMEN (2000)

LIBYAN WOMEN is a photographic report on the position of women in Libya, one of the most progressive Arab countries in the field of women’s rights. Libyan women have the right to welfare, to own property, to divorce and to pensions. They also make up half of the academic population. But their emancipation is far from complete. In the countryside 20% of the women are illiterate, and most of the traditional Bedouin tribes – pillars of the Khadaffi regime – to this day require women to wear a veil and permit them to work only inside the house or in the fields. In some isolated regions female circumcision is still practised.

Reza >>

  • LIBYAN WOMEN (2000)

    LIBYAN WOMEN is a photographic report on the position of women in Libya, one of the most progressive Arab countries in the field of women’s rights. Libyan women have the right to welfare, to own property, to divorce and to pensions. They also make up half of the academic population. But their emancipation is far from complete. In the countryside 20% of the women are illiterate, and most of the traditional Bedouin tribes – pillars of the Khadaffi regime – to this day require women to wear a veil and permit them to work only inside the house or in the fields. In some isolated regions female circumcision is still practised.

  • LIBYAN WOMEN (2000)

  • LIBYAN WOMEN (2000)

  • LIBYAN WOMEN (2000)

  • LIBYAN WOMEN (2000)

Ahikam Seri

Ahikam Seri

BEDOUIN OF THE ISRAELI NEGEV (2001-2003)

For centuries the Bedouin have lived in the Negev desert, which with the founding of Israel in 1948 came into Israeli hands. Some 90,000 Bedouin fled to Egypt or Jordan; the remaining 10,000 decided to remain. They became subject to Israeli politics, which focused on concentrating the Arab desert peoples in cities controlled by the Israeli state. Today 60,000 Bedouin live in such cities, which suffer from unemployment, poverty and criminality. Another 70,000 Bedouin refuse to give up the land of their birth and their lives in 45 towns not acknowledged by the state. These towns lack such basic amenities as water, electricity and sewers. The fate of the Bedouin of the Negev desert interested freelance journalist Ahikam Seri (b. Israel, 1972). He produced an extensive reportage on the circumstances in which they live and their struggle against the Israeli government. This is increasing in vehemence because, as a result of religious and social economic circumstances, the Bedouin – as tribal communities traditionally loyal to various regimes – increasingly declare their solidarity with the Palestinians.

Ahikam Seri >>

  • BEDOUIN OF THE ISRAELI NEGEV (2001-2003)

    For centuries the Bedouin have lived in the Negev desert, which with the founding of Israel in 1948 came into Israeli hands. Some 90,000 Bedouin fled to Egypt or Jordan; the remaining 10,000 decided to remain. They became subject to Israeli politics, which focused on concentrating the Arab desert peoples in cities controlled by the Israeli state. Today 60,000 Bedouin live in such cities, which suffer from unemployment, poverty and criminality. Another 70,000 Bedouin refuse to give up the land of their birth and their lives in 45 towns not acknowledged by the state. These towns lack such basic amenities as water, electricity and sewers. The fate of the Bedouin of the Negev desert interested freelance journalist Ahikam Seri (b. Israel, 1972). He produced an extensive reportage on the circumstances in which they live and their struggle against the Israeli government. This is increasing in vehemence because, as a result of religious and social economic circumstances, the Bedouin – as tribal communities traditionally loyal to various regimes – increasingly declare their solidarity with the Palestinians.

  • BEDOUIN OF THE ISRAELI NEGEV (2001-2003)

  • BEDOUIN OF THE ISRAELI NEGEV (2001-2003)

  • BEDOUIN OF THE ISRAELI NEGEV (2001-2003)

  • BEDOUIN OF THE ISRAELI NEGEV (2001-2003)

Lars Tunbjörk

Lars Tunbjörk

OMAN (1999)

Because of its damp climate the south of Oman, a sultanate on the Arabian peninsula, is a magnet for the surrounding countries. During the rainy season tourists from the relatively wealthy countries such as the United Arab Emirates and Kuwait flock to the region to enjoy the sea, the mountain lakes and cool air. The most popular activities are hiking in nature and picnicking till deep in the night. The Swedish photographer Lars Tunbjörk photographed the tourism in the south of Oman for Geo Magazine. As always, he has kept a critical eye for the commercial aspects of people’s leisure activities.

Lars Tunbjörk >>

  • OMAN (1999)

    Because of its damp climate the south of Oman, a sultanate on the Arabian peninsula, is a magnet for the surrounding countries. During the rainy season tourists from the relatively wealthy countries such as the United Arab Emirates and Kuwait flock to the region to enjoy the sea, the mountain lakes and cool air. The most popular activities are hiking in nature and picnicking till deep in the night. The Swedish photographer Lars Tunbjörk photographed the tourism in the south of Oman for Geo Magazine. As always, he has kept a critical eye for the commercial aspects of people’s leisure activities.

  • OMAN (1999)

  • OMAN (1999)

  • OMAN (1999)

  • OMAN (1999)

Ilkka Uimonen

Ilkka Uimonen

CYCLES (2000)

Photographer Ilkka Uimonen (b. Finland, 1966) sees the conflicts in the Middle East as a part of an endless cycle of violence. This began three millennia ago and entered a new phase in 2000 with the start of the second Intifada. In the two years that Uimonen devoted to recording it, the conflict claimed 600 Israeli and 1600 Palestinian lives. The Finn sees his photographs as the record of a cycle of violence which, to his mind, will go on for the next 1000 years. As his justification he cites the philosophy of Carl Jung, who proposed that conflicts will never be resolved so long as emotions have displaced reason.

Ilkka Uimonen >>

  • CYCLES (2000)

    Photographer Ilkka Uimonen (b. Finland, 1966) sees the conflicts in the Middle East as a part of an endless cycle of violence. This began three millennia ago and entered a new phase in 2000 with the start of the second Intifada. In the two years that Uimonen devoted to recording it, the conflict claimed 600 Israeli and 1600 Palestinian lives. The Finn sees his photographs as the record of a cycle of violence which, to his mind, will go on for the next 1000 years. As his justification he cites the philosophy of Carl Jung, who proposed that conflicts will never be resolved so long as emotions have displaced reason.

  • CYCLES (2000)

  • CYCLES (2000)

  • CYCLES (2000)

  • CYCLES (2000)