Overview participating photographers

Ad van Denderen

Ad van Denderen

ISRAËL BALADIA (2012) / WEST BANK RAWABI (2013)

As far back as the 1970s Ad van Denderen was following developments in the relation between the Israelis and Palestinians from close up. In the course of time he has watched the two peoples grow farther away from each other.

In 2012 Van Denderen photographed Baladia City, the National Urban Training Center of the Israeli army. In this mock city soldiers are trained to capture Palestinian cities in the shortest time possible. In contrast Van Denderen in his follow-up series turns his camera on Rawabi, a new city under construction where about 40,000 Palestinian families will live. Rawabi is rising about ten kilometres north of Ramallah, on the West Bank of the Jordan River, and in terms of technology and infrastructure will fully geared to the demands of life today.

For his contribution to The Sequel Van Denderen has combined the two series, and supplements them with historic archive images and his own work from the periods 1990-1995 and 2002-2003. The result is a nuanced but urgent recapitulation of the ever intensifying conflict on the West Bank of the Jordan, with special attention for the role of architecture.

Ad van Denderen (b. Netherlands, 1943) studied graphic design in Utrecht before becoming a freelance photographer. Among the photo books he has to his name are Welkom in Suid-Afrika, Peace in the Holy Land, Go No Go, Occupation Soldier and So Blue, So Blue. He has won the Capi-Lux Alblas oeuvre prize, the CARE-Award, the Visa d’Or, the Dick Scherpenzeel Prize and a career prize from the BKVB Fund. He photographed Useful Photography #004, an issue about Palestinian martyrdom. In his work, which has been exhibited worldwide, Van Denderen seeks the intimate, personal stories behind greater themes like immigration, apartheid and war.

Ad van Denderen is represented by Agence VU’ (Paris) and Galerie West (The Hague).

  • Ad van Denderen

    ISRAËL BALADIA (2012) / WEST BANK RAWABI (2013)

  • Ad van Denderen

    ISRAËL BALADIA (2012) / WEST BANK RAWABI (2013)

  • Ad van Denderen

    ISRAËL BALADIA (2012) / WEST BANK RAWABI (2013)

  • Ad van Denderen

    ISRAËL BALADIA (2012) / WEST BANK RAWABI (2013)

  • Ad van Denderen

    ISRAËL BALADIA (2012) / WEST BANK RAWABI (2013)

Pieter ten Hoopen

Pieter ten Hoopen

THE INVISIBLE CITY (2007) / KITEZH - VLADIMIRSKOE (2013)

In the year 1200 the Mongol army was advancing on the city of Kitezh, in eastern  Russia. Just before their troops reached Kitezh, the city disappeared. On the site where it had stood there was now a lake. No one knows what happened to the city and its people: they simply vanished.

Every year on Midsummer Day thousands of Russians make the eastward trek to this place in the midst of the former Kolchoz (collective) farms. On the longest day of the year, so goes the story, the city again rises from the water. People walk or crawl around the lake because to do so brings good luck; others do so hoping for healing. Kitezh is a cultural trope in Russia. The mythic city symbolizes a better world, without pain and deprivation.

Since the fall of communism Russia has been seeking a new identity, a new direction. Particularly in the countryside services and the old certainties of life have crumbled away. People were promised a free world according to the Western model, but the reality is that the grain goes unharvested and the young people are leaving for the city as quickly as they can. Those left behind are generally the elderly, or addicted to alcohol. Many die before their time.

In 2007 Pieter ten Hoopen photographed Kitezh for the first time. With that series – small, non-documentary, primarily focused on the aura and the myth of the vanished city – he won his first World Press Photo Award. His follow-up has taken the form of a film in which Ten Hoopen now focuses on the everyday life of the local population. The dream of Kitezh, the dream of a better world in which things were in equilibrium, is still the thread which runs through it. But where in 2007 Ten Hoopen only followed that dream, he now uses the vanished city as a symbol for the present state of affairs in this part of Russia.

Pieter ten Hoopen (b. Netherlands, 1974) emigrated in 1999 to Sweden, where he studied photojournalism at the Nordens Fotoskola. His work has appeared in major Swedish newspapers and various international magazines. For his own projects he received the Mario Giacomelli Memorial Prize, two Picture of the Year USA awards, and three World Press Photo Awards, for his original series on Kitezh, and for his project about the town of Hungry Horse in the state of Montana, in the U.S.A. Ten Hoopen has also been voted Photographer of the Year in Sweden. He is connected with Agence VU'.

 

Pieter ten Hoopen is represented by Agence VU’ (Paris).

  • Pieter ten Hoopen

    THE INVISIBLE CITY (2007) / KITEZH - VLADIMIRSKOE (2011)

  • Pieter ten Hoope

    THE INVISIBLE CITY (2007) / KITEZH - VLADIMIRSKOE (2013)

  • Pieter ten Hoope

    THE INVISIBLE CITY (2007) / KITEZH - VLADIMIRSKOE (2013)

  • Pieter ten Hoopen

    THE INVISIBLE CITY (2007) / KITEZH - VLADIMIRSKOE (2013)

  • Pieter ten Hoopen

    THE INVISIBLE CITY (2007) / KITEZH - VLADIMIRSKOE (2013)

Christian Kryl

Christian Kryl

TOP OF THE WORLD (2008-2013) / PERMISSION (2013)

Christian Kryl has worked for some years now on documenting places where the international jet set traditionally gather and which have acquired an 'über-imago' through the media (particularly the tabloids). Through various angles he thus makes a little documented social upper crust his subject.

In 2008 he began TOP OF THE WORLD, a series on the Swiss winter sport centre Sankt Moritz, for which he photographed the visitors trying to blend in with that über-imago in an attempt to appropriate something of the aura of Sankt Mortiz for themselves. As Kryl observes, it is the sort of place where one can still wear furs without others giving you funny looks. He sees that as a metaphor for the mores of the people who are behind the unreal numbers of bonuses, bailouts and billion dollar profits.

For The Sequel Kryl once again photographed in Sankt Moritz and in Monaco, a place with an über-imago deeply rooted in the glamour of the 1950s and '60s. In the series PERMISSION Kryl focuses on the current surveillance culture, which has become particularly intensive in the microcosm of Monaco, in an effort to safeguard the privacy and security of its residents. In Monaco, 'a ghetto for the rich, who live in flats because they don't want to pay taxes', there doesn't seem to be any public space left any more. To photograph on the street one must apply for no less than three permits – which the police and private security guards were constantly asking Kryl to produce. The new series is comprised of self-portraits in which such checks are recorded.

Christian Kryl (b. West Germany, 1979) graduated cum laude from the Royal Academy of Art in The Hague in 2009. His work has appeared in NRC Next, Die Zeit, ZEITmagazin, Wired Magazine and other periodicals. The original TOP OF THE WORLD series was honoured with the Prix Voies Off 2012 in Arles. That project was also nominated for the Steenbergen Stipendium. Kryl lives in Amsterdam.

  • Christian Kryl

    PERMISSION (2013)

  • Christian Kryl

    PERMISSION (2013)

  • Christian Kryl

    TOP OF THE WORLD (2008-2013)

  • Christian Kryl

    TOP OF THE WORLD (2008-2013)

Kadir van Lohuizen

Kadir van Lohuizen

LIVING APART TOGETHER (1993 & 2013)

In 1993, for a commission from the Amsterdam Municipal Archive, Kadir van Lohuizen followed the life of a family of Moroccan origin, living in Amsterdam Oost. The father, Ali, had just retired after a career as a factory worker which had begun in the 1960s as a guest worker at Friki. The mother, Laila, worked in the local community centre, the three youngest children were in school in Amsterdam, and the other three children had returned to Morocco to live. Van Lohuizen accompanied the family when they went back to Morocco on vacation and to visit relatives there. He saw an average family who tried to be part of the Dutch society, but nevertheless continued to be viewed as ‘those Moroccans’, while in Morocco they were viewed as the strange people from The Netherlands.

Now, twenty years later, Van Lohuizen visited this family again. Have they finally found their place in Dutch society, or have they shaped their identity in some other manner? What do they think about the hardening of Dutch society and the rise of the populist, anti-immigrant party, the PVV? With his sequel Van Lohuizen poses  essential questions that touch directly on Dutch integration policy. When are you really Dutch? When are you accepted?

At the same time, this series is not just about the changes in the lives of a family and in Dutch society. Indirectly, he also reveals how a now widely honoured photographer has grown and changed, after two decades of roaming the world and working on a range of social subjects. In a certain sense, for The Sequel Van Lohuizen returned to The Netherlands and the beginning of his career.

Kadir van Lohuizen (b. Netherlands, 1963) began his working life as a seaman and as the founder of a shelter for the homeless and drug addicts. Since 1988 he has worked as a freelance photojournalist. He has reported on many conflicts, chiefly in Africa, for magazines and newspapers. Among the awards he has collected are the Silver Camera, the Dick Scherpenzeel Prize , two World Press Photo Awards and the Kees Scherer Prize for the best photo book, and his work in Chad earned him the PDN Annual Award and the Visa d’Or News. In 2011 Van Lohuizen travelled from Tierra del Fuego to Alaska for his Via PanAm project, which resulted in an iPad app, a multimedia exhibition and his fifth book. Van Lohuizen is connected with the NOOR photo agency, of which he was one of the founders.

  • Kadir van Lohuizen

    LIVING APART TOGETHER (2013)

  • Kadir van Lohuizen

    LIVING APART TOGETHER (1993)

  • Kadir van Lohuizen

    LIVING APART TOGETHER (1993)

  • Kadir van Lohuizen

    LIVING APART TOGETHER (2013)

  • Kadir van Lohuizen

    LIVING APART TOGETHER (2013)

Andrea Stultiens

Andrea Stultiens

Between 1932 and the mid-1960s the chemist Paul Julien (1901-2001) made a number of trips to sub-Saharan Africa. He had an intense interest in anthropology, and an insatiable appetite for travel. Julien, in conventional daily life a chemistry instructor, measured people, took blood samples, wrote up his travels, photographed and filmed. He was a tourist, explorer and researcher, all rolled up in one. He lectured about his adventures, including on the radio for the Dutch broadcaster KRO, and published four books with accounts of his trips. In The Netherlands alone they ran through multiple editions, selling hundreds of thousands of copies.

Since 2001 Andrea Stultiens has also been travelling to Africa regularly. The initial culture shock led to her setting up and carrying out projects. To date this has resulted in three publications, a number of exhibitions, and the historic photo platform History In Progress Uganda. Her projects always concern the relation we have to the other, and the ways that photography can – or can not – visualize them.

Archive materials – texts, photos, official documents – play an important role in all of Stultiens's projects. For The Sequel Stultiens took the work pf Paul Julien and her own photography in Africa as her starting point. Stultiens places Julien's work, which sometimes seems to testify to colonial arrogance and prejudices, and other times to doubts about the significance of his own perceptions, in an historical perspective. She sought contact with historians in a number of the countries where Julien worked, and on the basis of their comments she herself photographed Nigeria, Uganda and Liberia. The result is work in which we become conscious of our gaze as an outsider and are challenged to reflect on it, while because of this approach the photos sometimes give away something that slips past us in a superficial examination. This presentation is the beginning of a larger research project involving the value of Paul Julien's work for today's Africa, and for the non-African viewer.

Andrea Stultiens (b. Netherlands, 1974) studied photographic design at the HKU, Utrecht School of the Arts and photography at Post-St. Joost in Breda. She took her MA in the Masters Photographic Studies at Leiden University. She is not only a photographer, but collects related material and reflects – through her own and found images and texts – on the way in which we visualize ourselves and others. Since 2007 Stultiens has worked primarily in Africa, and in particular in Uganda. In 2011 she was the initiator for the platform History In Progress Uganda, which collects and shares historic photos from and about Uganda, to provide them with stories in an attempt to nuance the historiography of that country. Stultiens has published several photo books and is an instructor and researcher at the Minerva Academy in Groningen.

  • Andrea Stultiens

    MUCH HAS CHANGED (1932-2013)
    photo: Paul Julien

  • Andrea Stultiens

    MUCH HAS CHANGED (1932-2013)
    photo: Paul Julien

  • Andrea Stultiens

    MUCH HAS CHANGED (1932-2013)

  • Andrea Stultiens

    MUCH HAS CHANGED (1932-2013)

Lidwien van der Ven

Lidwien van der Ven

DOCUMENT (2007) / DOCUMENT (II) (2013)

Of the photographers in The Sequel, Lidwien van de Ven best fits the category of  autonomous artist. Her work lies on the line between current events and her free interpretation of them, and is generally shown in the form of very large installations, in an art context. Since the late 1990s Van de Ven has focused on themes involving politics and religion, and since 2000 her work has increasingly been oriented to current developments in society. She poses philosophical questions about the medium of photography, about reality in the internet era, about visibility and invisibility, and about the way in which journalism mediates between reality and the representation of it.

Prior to 2007 Van de Ven had worked for long periods in the Middle East. There she was a witness to the pre-9/11 era, but also to the political and social impact of the Bush administrations' policy in the aftermath of the attack on the Twin Towers. This resulted in the 2007 installation and series ‘document’, which was presented at Documenta 12 in Kassel.

For The Sequel Van de Ven returned to the Middle East, and in particular Cairo, in  Egypt, after years of absence. Since the revolution in 2011 radical changes have taken place, and developments are continuing daily, as this is being written. In addition, she worked at the Zaatari refugee camp in Jordan, on the border with Syria, and in Istanbul, just after the outbreak of police violence that began with the intended  clearance of Gezi Park. For The Sequel Van de Ven has made a new installation in which she brings together images from these places.

It is primarily street scenes with graffiti that are to be seen in the installation document (II). Since the start of the revolution in 2011 graffiti have played a prominent role in the developments, not only as a means of expression, but also to instruct about the events. As though to create a constantly changing canvas, photos taken from digital sources such as mobile phones, TV and internet are copied onto the walls of the city, along with commentary, to make people aware of what is happening there.

In addition Van de Ven asked the activist Egyptian collective Kazeboon ('Liars') to make a video ‘for foreigners’. Kazeboon produces simple videos of TV and YouTube material that bluntly expose the falsehoods and contradictions in the statements of authorities such as the army or the Muslim Brotherhood, with the intention of explaining things to the population and raising doubts about their incontrovertible values – like trust in the army – and forcing them to think for themselves. The videos are shown in public space in Egypt, generally on a white sheet, using electricity tapped from a street light.
In the video for The Sequel they provide background for the turbulent events since Morsi was deposed by the army, and pose the central question of how to see these developments in the light of democracy.

Like the graffiti and the videos by Kazeboon, Van de Ven's work forms a reflection on what was originally intended with word ‘document’, derived from the Latin ‘docere’: to show, to instruct, or provide evidence.

Lidwien van de Ven (b. Netherlands, 1963) lives and works in Rotterdam and Berlin. Venues where her work has been seen include the Busan Biënnale (South Korea, 2012), Documenta 12 (Germany, 2007), and during the Sydney Biënnale (Australia, 2006). For her photography and installations she has received the prize from the Amsterdam Arts Council, the Charlotte Köhler Prize, the Maria Austria Award, and the French Culture Stipendium.

Lidwien van de Ven is represented by Galerie Paul Andriesse (Amsterdam).

Noorderlicht gratefully thanks Galerie Paul Andriesse for the generous loan of the exhibition ‘document’ by Lidwien van de Ven (2007).

  • Lidwien van de Ven

    DOCUMENT (2007) / DOCUMENT (II) (2013)

  • Lidwien van de Ven

    DOCUMENT (2007) / DOCUMENT (II) (2013)

  • Lidwien van de Ven

    DOCUMENT (2007) / DOCUMENT (II) (2013)

  • Lidwien van de Ven

    DOCUMENT (2007) / DOCUMENT (II) (2013)

Xiaoxiao Xu

Xiaoxiao Xu

WENZHOU (2009) / THE WAY TO THE GOLDEN MOUNTAIN (2013)

In 1999, as a teenager, Xiaoxiao Xu moved from China to The Netherlands. Photography became her antidote to the isolation that she felt, a means for telling stories and making clear what it was that occupied her.

In 2009 Xu photographed the city from which she and her parents had come. Wenzhou is a large port city in the eastern province of Zhejiang, with a population of three million. Xu was overwhelmed by the combination of memories and  contemporary experiences. She could identify with the city, but at the same time felt herself to be an outsider – just as she did in The Netherlands. This resulted in WENZHOU, a series that shows the city as a personal and emotional eexprience.

THE WAY TO THE GOLDEN MOUNTAIN is Xu’s follow-up project. She travelled to the emigration towns around Wenzhou – a region from which many of the Chinese in The Netherlands came, and also the site of the village where Xu was born. The emigration towns, she discovered, have changed greatly since her departure. There is no longer any agriculture, and the river has been filled in to build a motorway. The quiet, tranquil village of Xu’s memories is now comprised of concrete high-rises and villas. The higher the house, the greater the prestige.

Xu made contact with emigrants in The Netherlands, who had generally come to Europe in the 1960s, '70s and '80s for economic reasons. They nourished the dream of the 'golden mountain' by sending money home, without telling about the hard work and long hours. Inspired by the dream of a better life, most of the young people have left the emigration towns. In China Xu made photos of those who had stayed behind and their surroundings. At the same time she investigated the memories from her childhood. A century after the first Chinese set foot in The Netherlands, Xu once again plunged into her own history. The result is personal and universal at the same time.

When she was 14 Xiaoxiao Xu (b. China, 1984) emigrated to The Netherlands with her parents, where in 2009 she graduated cum laude from the Photo Academy in Amsterdam. She was twice nominated for the Joop Swart Masterclass at World Press Photo, and as a rising talent won both De Fotoprijs and the Photo Academy Award. Seeking a balance between the two cultures in which she grew up, she uses photography as a means of investigating her own identity.

  • Xiaoxiao Xu

    THE WAY TO THE GOLDEN MOUNTAIN (2013)

  • Xiaoxiao Xu

    WENZHOU (2009)

  • Xiaoxiao Xu

    WENZHOU (2009)

  • Xiaoxiao Xu

    WENZHOU (2009) / THE WAY TO THE GOLDEN MOUNTAIN (2013)

  • Xiaoxiao Xu

    THE WAY TO THE GOLDEN MOUNTAIN (2013)

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