Photographers / Photofestival 2013

The Sweet and Sour Story of Sugar - The Exhibition

Alejandro Chaskielberg

Alejandro Chaskielberg

Bittersweet Suriname (Suriname)

Along the banks of the Suriname and Commewijne rivers lie what remains of the once booming Dutch-Surinamese sugar industry. Since its downfall in the 1980s factories have been abandoned, machinery has been stolen or dismantled to be sold as scrap, and former plantations have been completely swallowed by jungle. The Argentine photographer Alejandro Chaskielberg travelled through Suriname to explore the remnants of this industry and the material and immaterial heritage of a colonial landscape in decay.

Alejandro Chaskielberg >>

  • Bittersweet Suriname

  • Bittersweet Suriname

  • Bittersweet Suriname

  • Bittersweet Suriname

  • Bittersweet Suriname

Alejandro Chaskielberg

Alejandro Chaskielberg

Sugar Heritage (The Netherlands)

Having photographed the remnants of Suriname’s sugar industry, the Argentine photographer Alejandro Chaskielberg arrived in Holland to pursue a similar goal. The Netherlands used to have dozens of factories. Only two factories remain after decades of remediation and a more liberal approach in European agricultural regulations from 2006 onwards. Chaskielberg visited five plants in different stages of the factories’ life cycle: from active and productive to abandoned and stripped of everything of value.

Alejandro Chaskielberg >>

  • Sugar Heritage

  • Sugar Heritage

  • Sugar Heritage

  • Sugar Heritage

  • Sugar Heritage

James Whitlow Delano

James Whitlow Delano

Looking back without Nostalgia (Suriname)

Even though the sugar industry has now completely disappeared from Suriname, its legacy can still be traced in the faces of local people. In Suriname sugar has been inextricably tied to migration. The need for cheap labour brought different groups of immigrants to Suriname at different stages of its colonial history. Some came involuntarily, some acting on promises made, others in search of a better life. American photographer James Whitlow Delano visited a wide range of ethnic groups whose histories have been linked with the sugar industry, laying bare the demographic history of this diverse nation.

James Whitlow Delano >>

  • Looking back without nostalgia

  • Looking back without nostalgia

  • Looking back without nostalgia

  • Looking back without nostalgia

  • Looking back without nostalgia

James Whitlow Delano

James Whitlow Delano

Looking back without Nostalgia (The Netherlands)

The ethnically diverse Surinamese population is a product of forced and voluntary labour migration designed to bring workers to the plantation economy. After the decolonization of Suriname in 1975, another wave of migration reached The Netherlands. The ailing Surinamese economy, the collapse of the plantation economy and the possibilities to build a new life in the country of the former colonial power caused an influx of almost 300,000 Surinamese. James Whitlow Delano documented the current state of Surinamese immigrant communities, visualizing the way Suriname’s sugar industry indirectly influenced the multicultural character of The Netherlands.

James Whitlow Delano >>

  • Looking back without Nostalgia

  • Looking back without nostalgia

  • Looking back without nostalgia

  • Looking back without nostalgia

  • Looking back without nostalgia

Ed Kashi

The Emerald Desert (Brazil)

Brazil has recently become the largest producer and exporter of sugar. Ed Kashi followed the production chain from the heartland of low-cost production around São Paulo to the harbours and factories where billions are made by processing and trading sugar and ethanol, a biofuel made from sugar cane. His work depicts an industry with a remarkable level of sophistication and attention to energy saving techniques, and stewardship of the land. But this success story has its drawbacks: it created a monoculture of cane fields stretching over several states and threatening bio-diversity, while the production of energy crops on farmland affects food prices

Ed Kashi >>

  • The Emerald Desert

  • The Emerald Desert

  • The Emerald Desert

  • The Emerald Desert

  • The Emerald Desert

Ed Kashi

Manufacturing Sweets (The Netherlands)

The North American photographer Ed Kashi travelled to The Netherlands to document the highly efficient factory facilities where sugar is used as an ingredient for the sweetening and preservation of food products. The stark production areas reveal a surreal side of modern food manufacture that remains largely unseen, except for those who work there.

Ed Kashi >>

  • Manufacturing Sweets

  • Manufacturing Sweets

  • Manufacturing Sweets

  • Manufacturing Sweets

  • Manufacturing Sweets

Carl De Keyzer

Sugar Illustrated (Indonesia)

Following the steady growth in national income, Indonesia is changing rapidly. A new society has arisen on top of the remnants of Dutch colonial structures. Carl De Keyzer documented everything pertaining to sugar in present day Indonesia, from Belgian chocolate stores to old sugar villages in decline. His work manifests the ambiguity between production and consumption, between tradition and modernity, and between the local and global economies.

Carl De Keyzer >>

  • Sugar Illustrated

  • Sugar Illustrated

  • Sugar Illustrated

  • Sugar Illustrated

  • Sugar Illustrated

Carl De Keyzer

Guided by Sugar (Belgium)

In Brussels approximately 18,000 lobbyists inform EU policy makers on every issue that may be of interest to either European businesses or NGOs. In the political arena of the European Parliament decisions are made on diverse issues that are of vital importance to the European sugar industry. Whether these decisions involve sugar and public health, the opening of the EU market for alternative sweeteners or trade measures protecting European farmers and industries, in Brussels the stakes are high. Belgian photographer Carl De Keyzer set out to peer into the formal and informal world of the sugar lobby.

Carl De Keyzer >>

  • Guided by Sugar

  • Guided by Sugar

  • Guided by Sugar

  • Guided by Sugar

  • Guided by Sugar

Tomasz Tomaszewski

Tomasz Tomaszewski

Sugar Towns (Indonesia)

The Javanese sugar towns were originally erected by the Dutch mainly for the purposes of producing white sugar that could be shipped to Europe and then distributed to other takers. After the Dutch left, the factories continued to produce sugar, albeit under less favourable circumstances. Nowadays the Indonesian sugar industry has many facets; some truly modern, some still harking back to the days when the Dutch were in charge. The Polish photographer Tomasz Tomaszewski documented the sugar towns in Java, starting his journey from the Perayaan Buka Giling, the traditional sugar festival that is intended to bring good luck for the coming production season.

Tomasz Tomaszewski >>

  • Sugar Towns

  • Sugar Towns

  • Sugar Towns

  • Sugar Towns

  • Sugar Towns

Tomasz Tomaszewski

Tomasz Tomaszewski

Sugar Town (The Netherlands)

The Vierverlaten sugar factory in the village of Hoogkerk is one of the two factories that survived the radical EU policy changes in 2006. During the almost 100 years of its existence the factory became part of the DNA of this small village. In Hoogkerk sugar means work, living in the shade of the factory’s sugar silos, the 24/7 coming and going of beet trucks, and the sweet smell that fills the air every harvest season. In contrast with the laissez-faire of Indonesian sugar towns, this Dutch counterpart might just as well have been on another planet: a regulated, clean, sterile and virginal place, the dominion of almost total automation.

Tomasz Tomaszewski >>

  • Sugar Town

  • Sugar Town

  • Sugar Town

  • Sugar Town

  • Sugar Town

Francesco Zizola

Francesco Zizola

Bitter Harvest (Brazil)

Francesco Zizola investigated the life and work of sugar cane cutters in the North-east of Brazil. The Dutch landed briefly in this region in the early 17th century, fighting over sugar profits with the Portuguese. Remnants of colonial power structures remain visible in the local society today, while strenuous manual labour by cane cutters is still an essential part of the sugar industry. Yet significant improvements have been taking place in the Brazilian industry. Due to the country’s economic boom, a shortage of cheap manual labour has ushered in a rapid increase in wages and close scrutiny of labour conditions by the state.

Francesco Zizola >>

  • Bitter Harvest

  • Bitter Harvest

  • Bitter Harvest

  • Bitter Harvest

  • Bitter Harvest

Francesco Zizola

Francesco Zizola

The Last Beet of Sweetness (The Netherlands)

Francesco Zizola documented the industrialized practice of sugar beet harvest in the Northern part of The Netherlands. It was only a few decades ago that Dutch agriculture was small scale, labour oriented and family owned. A modern sugar beet farm could hardly be more different: large scale, rationalized, industrial. But the ongoing fight for efficiency cannot guarantee profits in a global economy. To survive the international rat race, farmers either need political protection or production at the lowest possible prices.

Francesco Zizola >>

  • The Last Beet of Sweetness

  • The Last Beet of Sweetness

  • The Last Beet of Sweetness

  • The Last Beet of Sweetness

  • The Last Beet of Sweetness

To Have and Have Not

Mari Bastashevski

STATE BUSINESS (2012-ongoing)

In STATE BUSINESS the photographer Mari Bastashevski focuses on organizations and individuals who profit from the commercial aspects of protracted armed conflicts. On the basis of examples – in this case, the shadowy weapons deliveries to Armenia and Azerbaijan, which are involved in the conflict in Nagorno-Karabakh – one can demonstrate how commerce fuels these conflicts. An array of images, text and documents expose the underlying mechanisms and raise questions about the economic and ethical aspects of trade related to conflicts. In this, Bastashevski’s concerns include the grey area between legal and illegal trade, the culture of secrecy, perverse stimuli, the overlap between governments and commercial enterprises, and the rationalizations denying responsibility.

Mari Bastashevski >>

  • STATE BUSINESS

    (2012-ongoing)

  • STATE BUSINESS (2012-ongoing)

  • STATE BUSINESS (2012-ongoing)

  • STATE BUSINESS (2012-ongoing)

  • STATE BUSINESS (2012-ongoing)

Nina Berman

HEDGE (Verenigde Staten, 2010 / 2013)

Complex trading, based on proprietary knowledge and communicated through a privileged visual language, underpins all aspects of our global economy informing decision making and influencing the most basic human needs: food, shelter, energy, water. This language of money, while hypnotic in its abstraction, color and form, remains indecipherable to the average person who is nevertheless affected by its daily practice. Only a fluent few, the subjects of Hedge and the vast financial systems they represent, lay claim to its power and meaning.

Nina Berman >>

  • HEDGE (United States, 2013)

  • HEDGE (United States, 2013)

  • HEDGE (United States, 2013)

  • HEDGE (United States, 2013)

Carole Condé & Karl Beveridge

THE PLAGUE (2009) / SCENE OTHERWISE (2012)

With these two monumental images, a combination of staged scenes and collage, Karl Beveridge and Carole Condé illuminate both sides of the financial crisis and its aftermath: the haves and have-nots, the 1% and the 99%. THE PLAGUE links the environmental crisis and the economic crisis in an airport scene populated by contemporary and historic figures, representatives of a number of great financial crises since 1500, as well as economists and biologists. SCENE OTHERWISE is intended as a counterpoint, and is based on the Occupy camp which was set up in October and November, 2011, in Toronto. In this collage the issues that fed the Occupy movement are brought together and placed in an historical context.

Carole Condé & Karl Beveridge >>

  • THE PLAGUE (2009)

  • SCENE OTHERWISE (2012)

Mathieu Bernard-Reymond

TRADES (2013)

Inspired by the fall of Lehman Brothers, the commercial bank, as a consequence of the credit crisis, Mathieu Bernard-Reymond created graphic representations of the data from financial markets, including those from the final seven days when shares in Lehman Brothers were traded. TRADES reveals the intensity of the financial world, in which recurring patterns appear, caused by the algorithms which represent the largest proportion of financial decisions, today initiated by computer programmes. In addition Bernard-Reymond used historical tick by tick data – high-speed share trading oriented to producing a high volume of small profits.

Mathieu Bernard-Reymond >>

  • TRADES (2013)

  • TRADES (2013)

  • TRADES (2013)

  • TRADES (2013)

Hin Chua

THEY CALLED ME A CORPORATE WHORE (2005-2007)

Between 2005 and 2007, on the eve of the crisis, Hin Chua worked for a large investment bank in the financial district of London. Chua took his camera to work with him every day. Before, during and after office hours – to the extent that the 24/7 international financial world is so bounded – Chua investigated “The City”. The result was a vast number of photos of a world that believed itself unassailable and walked into a wall, with eyes wide open.

Hin Chua >>

  • THEY CALLED ME A CORPORATE WHORE (2005-2007)

  • THEY CALLED ME A CORPORATE WHORE (2005-2007)

  • THEY CALLED ME A CORPORATE WHORE (2005-2007)

  • THEY CALLED ME A CORPORATE WHORE (2005-2007)

  • THEY CALLED ME A CORPORATE WHORE (2005-2007)

Wiktor Dabkowski

WONDERLAND (2012)

Forty thousand European bureaucrats shuttle back and forth among Brussels, Luxembourg and Strasbourg, where they generate an incomprehensible volume of paperwork and regulations. They move in a quasi-futuristic world of luxury, privilege and secrecy. In part out of irritation, in part out of fascination, Wiktor Dabkowski travelled to the heart of European might, in an attempt to comprehend a culture of lobbyists and exchanges in the corridors of power. He found himself in a labyrinth that could only be navigated with knowledge and skills that outsiders lack.

Wiktor Dabkowski >>

  • WONDERLAND (2012)

  • WONDERLAND (2012)

  • WONDERLAND (2012)

  • WONDERLAND (2012)

  • WONDERLAND (2012)

Federico Estol

THE TREASURE ISLAND (2012)

Research by the IMF has revealed that the world’s financial elite have parked about 32 trillion (!) dollars in tax havens. Their purpose is to hide the money from the internal revenue authorities in the countries in which these firms and individuals operate. It is estimated that about 80% of all international financial transactions take place via offshore banking. Thus it is possible for banks in the relatively insignificant Cayman Islands – the subject of THE TREASURE ISLAND – to have 2.1 trillion dollars on their books. The bitter irony, says Federico Estol, is that all the problems of national debt and budget shortages could be solved if countries could collect tax on this hidden wealth of the elite.

Federico Estol >>

  • THE TREASURE ISLAND (2012)

  • THE TREASURE ISLAND (2012)

  • THE TREASURE ISLAND (2012)

  • THE TREASURE ISLAND (2012)

  • THE TREASURE ISLAND (2012)

Lauren Greenfield

THE QUEEN OF VERSAILLES (2012)

In her much praised documentary THE QUEEN OF VERSAILLES Lauren Greenfield follows the family of a billionaire who loses it all in the economic crisis. On the eve of the crisis the resort mogul David Siegel and his younger wife Jackie have plans to build the biggest house in America. But when the real estate bubble bursts it is a death blow for the Siegels’ empire. Its loss demanded vast changes in their lifestyle, character and world-view. Their incapacity to adapt – particularly on Jackie’s part – led to a tragedy of epic proportions. Greenfield recorded it with a sharp but compassionate eye.

Lauren Greenfield >>

  • THE QUEEN OF VERSAILLES (2012)

  • THE QUEEN OF VERSAILLES (2012)

  • THE QUEEN OF VERSAILLES (2012)

  • THE QUEEN OF VERSAILLES (2012)

  • THE QUEEN OF VERSAILLES (2012)

Zoe Hatzyannaki

SECRETS & CRISES (2010-2013)

In the diptychs of SECRETS & CRISES Zoe Hatzyannaki always shows a building in Athens which houses a public institution, alongside a bit of detail from the same image, massively enlarged. The vague details suggest that there is something obscure and hidden, or even dubious going on behind the doors, windows and walls. Enlargement does not provide more clarity, but underscores the lack of transparency. With this project Hatzyannaki touches on the dubious role that the state played in the present Greek malaise. Sparked by the frustration and confusion among the Greeks, anxious about their future, the role of public institutions is now being seriously questioned.

Zoe Hatzyannaki >>

  • SECRETS & CRISES (2010-2013)

  • SECRETS & CRISES (2010-2013)

  • SECRETS & CRISES (2010-2013)

  • SECRETS & CRISES (2010-2013)

kennardphillips

PHOTOMONTAGES (2009, 2011) / STUDIES FOR A HEAD (2012)

In their PHOTOMONTAGES the two artists comprising kennardphillipps offer razor-sharp commentary on political and financial elites, and the way in which the two are intertwined with one another at the expense of the majority of the population and the welfare of the planet. Both artists do not see their work as autonomous, but as the visual arm of a protest movement resisting the present political and economic order.

For STUDIES FOR A HEAD portraits of David Cameron, the former PR man who became the prime minister of Britain, were printed on pages of the Financial Times. The paper is torn to pieces to expose the underlying story of the poverty of the many and the wealth of the few. The violent images echo the way the Conservative Party deals with the welfare state, the handicapped, the unemployed and the poor. kennardphillips answer destruction with destruction.

kennardphillips >>

  • PHOTOMONTAGES (2009, 2011)

  • PHOTOMONTAGES (2009, 2011)

  • STUDIES FOR A HEAD (2012)

  • STUDIES FOR A HEAD (2012)

  • STUDIES FOR A HEAD (2012)

Christian Lutz

TROPICAL GIFT (2010) / PROTOKOLL (2007)

Three quarters of the income of the Nigerian government derives from the natural resources that are extracted from the Niger Delta. It is, quite literally, a dirty game: since the late 1950s about nine million barrels of raw oil have been spilled into the delta. The average life expectancy in the delta is 40 years, and 90% of the Nigerian population live in bitter poverty. In TROPICAL GIFT Lutz exposes the shadowy oil game with its losers and winners – to the extent there can be winners in this repellent game. Handshakes are exchanged among expats and local oilmen in the name of trade, and the soul and the country are betrayed for a quick profit. 

In PROTOKOLL Lutz uses irony to analyse the environment in which political office-holders and other officials do their work. For three years he followed the official visits of a member of the Swiss Federal Council, in a world full of strictly prescribed protocols. The work shows how hierarchy and the theatre of power structure politics.

Christian Lutz >>

  • TROPICAL GIFT (2010)

  • TROPICAL GIFT (2010)

  • TROPICAL GIFT (2010)

  • TROPICAL GIFT (2010)

  • TROPICAL GIFT (2010)

  • PROTOKOLL (2007)

  • PROTOKOLL (2007)

  • PROTOKOLL (2007)

  • PROTOKOLL (2007)

  • PROTOKOLL (2007)

Mark Peterson

ACTS OF CHARITY (1992-2004)

In America, unlike for instance in Europe, charity is largely an individual affair, and not institutionalized. During the economic heyday of the dot.com boom, in a city like New York there were almost non-stop banquets and parties for good causes. Although they were supposed to be about the homeless and poor, they primarily offered the givers a chance to be seen, to eat, to drink, to make contacts and enjoy themselves. It makes charity – such evenings still exist in the shrinking economy – into an ambiguous activity. Who are these evenings really for?

Mark Peterson >>

  • ACTS OF CHARITY (1992-2004)

  • ACTS OF CHARITY (1992-2004)

  • ACTS OF CHARITY (1992-2004)

  • ACTS OF CHARITY (1992-2004)

  • ACTS OF CHARITY (1992-2004)

Louis Porter

THE ANATOMY OF BUSINESS (2012)

In 2008, the crisis had just started, Louis Porter came into the possession of the photographic archive of a financial newspaper from the early 1980s. The archive comprised 4000 photos and other sorts of visual material with regard to financial institutions, businessmen and business news. Porter used the images as a starting point for a second series, made in the same places but thirty years later, in a changed financial world. The result is a sampler of “gestures” and motifs that form the heart of the photographic vocabulary in which the world of high finance and international trade is captured.

Louis Porter >>

  • THE ANATOMY OF BUSINESS (2012)

  • THE ANATOMY OF BUSINESS (2012)

  • THE ANATOMY OF BUSINESS (2012)

  • THE ANATOMY OF BUSINESS (2012)

  • THE ANATOMY OF BUSINESS (2012)

Francisco Reina

THE ART OF POWER (2010)

We are inclined to think that institutions are driven by reason and collective interests of society. This era, Francisco Reina says, has shown how much of an illusion that idea is, certainly in Spain. Institutions, whether in the public or private sector, are to an increasing degree in the grip of small but very powerful political and economic groups, which have scarcely any contact with the society. Reina has digitally manipulated their bulwarks to make the inaccessibility and opacity of power visually perceptible.

Francisco Reina >>

  • THE ART OF POWER (2010)

  • THE ART OF POWER (2010)

  • THE ART OF POWER (2010)

  • THE ART OF POWER (2010)

  • THE ART OF POWER (2010)

Anna Skladmann

LITTLE ADULTS (2010)

In LITTLE ADULTS Anna Skladmann investigates what it must be like to grow up as a priviledged child in Russia – a country where there are enormous social and economic differences, and a whole class of the wealthy and powerful arose from the fall of communism. Skladmann penetrated that world, and like a court painter recorded the children in a way that reflects both the past and future of Russia.

Anna Skladmann >>

  • LITTLE ADULTS (2010)

  • LITTLE ADULTS (2010)

  • LITTLE ADULTS (2010)

  • LITTLE ADULTS (2010)

  • LITTLE ADULTS (2010)

Will Steacy

DOWN THESE MEAN STREETS (2012)

Three decades of deregulation and growing income discrepancies in the United States have led to a middle class that is financially powerless. The complete DOWN THESE MEAN STREETS includes an over 50-metre-long collage in which the story of the deconstruction of the American dream is told on the basis of images, clippings and text, as seen through the eyes of those who have been left behind in the dust of the Great Recession. DOWN THESE MEAN STREETS investigates the years of the crisis within the broader context of the century which preceded them: post-war economic growth, deregulation, privatization and budget cuts (for everyone except the military) during and after the Reagan years, and the fatal blow to the idea of American invincibility and the culture of fear after the 9/11 attacks in 2001.

Will Steacy >>

  • DOWN THESE MEAN STREETS (2012)

  • DOWN THESE MEAN STREETS (2012)

  • DOWN THESE MEAN STREETS (2012)

  • DOWN THESE MEAN STREETS (2012)

  • DOWN THESE MEAN STREETS (2012)

Jan Stradtmann

THE TAX DODGERS’ FOOTPATH (2012)

For decades Germans knew they could avoid taxes by parking their money in bank accounts in Austria and Switzerland. Much of this money was carried across the borders physically, through the Customs posts that Jan Stradtmann has recorded. Now Germany has concluded a tax treaty with Switzerland which requires that Swiss banks turn over information on suspected clandestine accounts to Germany tax authorities. Since the treaty increased amounts of money and documents have surfaced in customs checks, as nervous tax dodgers try to get their cash and papers back into Germany, to once again stay ahead of the tax man.

Jan Stradtmann >>

  • THE TAX DODGERS’ FOOTPATH (2012)

  • THE TAX DODGERS’ FOOTPATH (2012)

  • THE TAX DODGERS’ FOOTPATH (2012)

David Straight

BLAMEWORTHY (2012)

BLAMEWORTHY arose as a response to an article that appeared in TIME in 2009: ‘25 People to Blame for the Financial Crisis’. The selection that TIME made included an eclectic company of politicians and CEOs, but also pointed an accusing finger at the public, who had eagerly participated in risky financial transactions like mortgages they could not really afford. From diverse websites Straight collected low resolution portraits of the main culprits, framed them uniformly and made them so dark that the faces can barely be seen through the blackness. The darkness reflects the shadowy nature of the actions of those involved. But, paradoxically enough, it also forces us to look more carefully, to see the guilty more clearly.

David Straight >>

  • BLAMEWORTHY (2012)

  • BLAMEWORTHY (2012)

  • BLAMEWORTHY (2012)

  • BLAMEWORTHY (2012)

  • BLAMEWORTHY (2012)

Devin Yalkin

THE $IGN OF TIMES (2011-2012)

In his visual representation of the present economic crisis in America, Devin Yalkin lets the world of the political and financial elite collide with that of activists and demonstrators. How do hearings in the House of Representatives and the Senate in Washington relate to the large groups of people who took to the streets of New York to stand up for ideals, justice and human values? In gritty black and white Yalkin captures the chaotic, confused and tense state of the country.

Devin Yalkin >>

  • THE $IGN OF TIMES (2011-2012)

  • THE $IGN OF TIMES (2011-2012)

  • THE $IGN OF TIMES (2011-2012)

  • THE $IGN OF TIMES (2011-2012)

  • THE $IGN OF TIMES (2011-2012)

Luca Zanier

CORRIDORS OF POWER (2008-ongoing)

Economic, political and social power is concentrated in the hands of relatively few people, who operate in a world quite distant from everyday reality. The public rituals that accompany their decision making take place locations that should be symbolic of the power of the people. Luca Zanier recorded the halls, in all their magnificence, at moments when they were devoid of human activity.

Luca Zanier >>

  • CORRIDORS OF POWER (2008-ongoing)

  • CORRIDORS OF POWER (2008-ongoing)

  • CORRIDORS OF POWER (2008-ongoing)

  • CORRIDORS OF POWER (2008-ongoing)

  • CORRIDORS OF POWER (2008-ongoing)

The Sequel

Ad van Denderen

Ad van Denderen

ISRAËL BALADIA (2012) / WEST BANK RAWABI (2013)

As far back as the 1970s Ad van Denderen was following developments in the relation between the Israelis and Palestinians from close up. In the course of time he has watched the two peoples grow farther away from each other.

In 2012 Van Denderen photographed Baladia City, the National Urban Training Center of the Israeli army. In this mock city soldiers are trained to capture Palestinian cities in the shortest time possible. In contrast Van Denderen in his follow-up series turns his camera on Rawabi, a new city under construction where about 40,000 Palestinian families will live. Rawabi is rising about ten kilometres north of Ramallah, on the West Bank of the Jordan River, and in terms of technology and infrastructure will fully geared to the demands of life today.

For his contribution to The Sequel Van Denderen has combined the two series, and supplements them with historic archive images and his own work from the periods 1990-1995 and 2002-2003. The result is a nuanced but urgent recapitulation of the ever intensifying conflict on the West Bank of the Jordan, with special attention for the role of architecture.

Ad van Denderen (b. Netherlands, 1943) studied graphic design in Utrecht before becoming a freelance photographer. Among the photo books he has to his name are Welkom in Suid-Afrika, Peace in the Holy Land, Go No Go, Occupation Soldier and So Blue, So Blue. He has won the Capi-Lux Alblas oeuvre prize, the CARE-Award, the Visa d’Or, the Dick Scherpenzeel Prize and a career prize from the BKVB Fund. He photographed Useful Photography #004, an issue about Palestinian martyrdom. In his work, which has been exhibited worldwide, Van Denderen seeks the intimate, personal stories behind greater themes like immigration, apartheid and war.

Ad van Denderen is represented by Agence VU’ (Paris) and Galerie West (The Hague).

Ad van Denderen >>

  • Ad van Denderen

    ISRAËL BALADIA (2012) / WEST BANK RAWABI (2013)

  • Ad van Denderen

    ISRAËL BALADIA (2012) / WEST BANK RAWABI (2013)

  • Ad van Denderen

    ISRAËL BALADIA (2012) / WEST BANK RAWABI (2013)

  • Ad van Denderen

    ISRAËL BALADIA (2012) / WEST BANK RAWABI (2013)

  • Ad van Denderen

    ISRAËL BALADIA (2012) / WEST BANK RAWABI (2013)

Pieter ten Hoopen

Pieter ten Hoopen

THE INVISIBLE CITY (2007) / KITEZH - VLADIMIRSKOE (2013)

In the year 1200 the Mongol army was advancing on the city of Kitezh, in eastern  Russia. Just before their troops reached Kitezh, the city disappeared. On the site where it had stood there was now a lake. No one knows what happened to the city and its people: they simply vanished.

Every year on Midsummer Day thousands of Russians make the eastward trek to this place in the midst of the former Kolchoz (collective) farms. On the longest day of the year, so goes the story, the city again rises from the water. People walk or crawl around the lake because to do so brings good luck; others do so hoping for healing. Kitezh is a cultural trope in Russia. The mythic city symbolizes a better world, without pain and deprivation.

Since the fall of communism Russia has been seeking a new identity, a new direction. Particularly in the countryside services and the old certainties of life have crumbled away. People were promised a free world according to the Western model, but the reality is that the grain goes unharvested and the young people are leaving for the city as quickly as they can. Those left behind are generally the elderly, or addicted to alcohol. Many die before their time.

In 2007 Pieter ten Hoopen photographed Kitezh for the first time. With that series – small, non-documentary, primarily focused on the aura and the myth of the vanished city – he won his first World Press Photo Award. His follow-up has taken the form of a film in which Ten Hoopen now focuses on the everyday life of the local population. The dream of Kitezh, the dream of a better world in which things were in equilibrium, is still the thread which runs through it. But where in 2007 Ten Hoopen only followed that dream, he now uses the vanished city as a symbol for the present state of affairs in this part of Russia.

Pieter ten Hoopen (b. Netherlands, 1974) emigrated in 1999 to Sweden, where he studied photojournalism at the Nordens Fotoskola. His work has appeared in major Swedish newspapers and various international magazines. For his own projects he received the Mario Giacomelli Memorial Prize, two Picture of the Year USA awards, and three World Press Photo Awards, for his original series on Kitezh, and for his project about the town of Hungry Horse in the state of Montana, in the U.S.A. Ten Hoopen has also been voted Photographer of the Year in Sweden. He is connected with Agence VU'.

 

Pieter ten Hoopen is represented by Agence VU’ (Paris).

Pieter ten Hoopen >>

  • Pieter ten Hoopen

    THE INVISIBLE CITY (2007) / KITEZH - VLADIMIRSKOE (2011)

  • Pieter ten Hoope

    THE INVISIBLE CITY (2007) / KITEZH - VLADIMIRSKOE (2013)

  • Pieter ten Hoope

    THE INVISIBLE CITY (2007) / KITEZH - VLADIMIRSKOE (2013)

  • Pieter ten Hoopen

    THE INVISIBLE CITY (2007) / KITEZH - VLADIMIRSKOE (2013)

  • Pieter ten Hoopen

    THE INVISIBLE CITY (2007) / KITEZH - VLADIMIRSKOE (2013)

Christian Kryl

Christian Kryl

TOP OF THE WORLD (2008-2013) / PERMISSION (2013)

Christian Kryl has worked for some years now on documenting places where the international jet set traditionally gather and which have acquired an 'über-imago' through the media (particularly the tabloids). Through various angles he thus makes a little documented social upper crust his subject.

In 2008 he began TOP OF THE WORLD, a series on the Swiss winter sport centre Sankt Moritz, for which he photographed the visitors trying to blend in with that über-imago in an attempt to appropriate something of the aura of Sankt Mortiz for themselves. As Kryl observes, it is the sort of place where one can still wear furs without others giving you funny looks. He sees that as a metaphor for the mores of the people who are behind the unreal numbers of bonuses, bailouts and billion dollar profits.

For The Sequel Kryl once again photographed in Sankt Moritz and in Monaco, a place with an über-imago deeply rooted in the glamour of the 1950s and '60s. In the series PERMISSION Kryl focuses on the current surveillance culture, which has become particularly intensive in the microcosm of Monaco, in an effort to safeguard the privacy and security of its residents. In Monaco, 'a ghetto for the rich, who live in flats because they don't want to pay taxes', there doesn't seem to be any public space left any more. To photograph on the street one must apply for no less than three permits – which the police and private security guards were constantly asking Kryl to produce. The new series is comprised of self-portraits in which such checks are recorded.

Christian Kryl (b. West Germany, 1979) graduated cum laude from the Royal Academy of Art in The Hague in 2009. His work has appeared in NRC Next, Die Zeit, ZEITmagazin, Wired Magazine and other periodicals. The original TOP OF THE WORLD series was honoured with the Prix Voies Off 2012 in Arles. That project was also nominated for the Steenbergen Stipendium. Kryl lives in Amsterdam.

Christian Kryl >>

  • Christian Kryl

    PERMISSION (2013)

  • Christian Kryl

    PERMISSION (2013)

  • Christian Kryl

    TOP OF THE WORLD (2008-2013)

  • Christian Kryl

    TOP OF THE WORLD (2008-2013)

Kadir van Lohuizen

Kadir van Lohuizen

LIVING APART TOGETHER (1993 & 2013)

In 1993, for a commission from the Amsterdam Municipal Archive, Kadir van Lohuizen followed the life of a family of Moroccan origin, living in Amsterdam Oost. The father, Ali, had just retired after a career as a factory worker which had begun in the 1960s as a guest worker at Friki. The mother, Laila, worked in the local community centre, the three youngest children were in school in Amsterdam, and the other three children had returned to Morocco to live. Van Lohuizen accompanied the family when they went back to Morocco on vacation and to visit relatives there. He saw an average family who tried to be part of the Dutch society, but nevertheless continued to be viewed as ‘those Moroccans’, while in Morocco they were viewed as the strange people from The Netherlands.

Now, twenty years later, Van Lohuizen visited this family again. Have they finally found their place in Dutch society, or have they shaped their identity in some other manner? What do they think about the hardening of Dutch society and the rise of the populist, anti-immigrant party, the PVV? With his sequel Van Lohuizen poses  essential questions that touch directly on Dutch integration policy. When are you really Dutch? When are you accepted?

At the same time, this series is not just about the changes in the lives of a family and in Dutch society. Indirectly, he also reveals how a now widely honoured photographer has grown and changed, after two decades of roaming the world and working on a range of social subjects. In a certain sense, for The Sequel Van Lohuizen returned to The Netherlands and the beginning of his career.

Kadir van Lohuizen (b. Netherlands, 1963) began his working life as a seaman and as the founder of a shelter for the homeless and drug addicts. Since 1988 he has worked as a freelance photojournalist. He has reported on many conflicts, chiefly in Africa, for magazines and newspapers. Among the awards he has collected are the Silver Camera, the Dick Scherpenzeel Prize , two World Press Photo Awards and the Kees Scherer Prize for the best photo book, and his work in Chad earned him the PDN Annual Award and the Visa d’Or News. In 2011 Van Lohuizen travelled from Tierra del Fuego to Alaska for his Via PanAm project, which resulted in an iPad app, a multimedia exhibition and his fifth book. Van Lohuizen is connected with the NOOR photo agency, of which he was one of the founders.

Kadir van Lohuizen >>

  • Kadir van Lohuizen

    LIVING APART TOGETHER (2013)

  • Kadir van Lohuizen

    LIVING APART TOGETHER (1993)

  • Kadir van Lohuizen

    LIVING APART TOGETHER (1993)

  • Kadir van Lohuizen

    LIVING APART TOGETHER (2013)

  • Kadir van Lohuizen

    LIVING APART TOGETHER (2013)

Andrea Stultiens

Andrea Stultiens

Between 1932 and the mid-1960s the chemist Paul Julien (1901-2001) made a number of trips to sub-Saharan Africa. He had an intense interest in anthropology, and an insatiable appetite for travel. Julien, in conventional daily life a chemistry instructor, measured people, took blood samples, wrote up his travels, photographed and filmed. He was a tourist, explorer and researcher, all rolled up in one. He lectured about his adventures, including on the radio for the Dutch broadcaster KRO, and published four books with accounts of his trips. In The Netherlands alone they ran through multiple editions, selling hundreds of thousands of copies.

Since 2001 Andrea Stultiens has also been travelling to Africa regularly. The initial culture shock led to her setting up and carrying out projects. To date this has resulted in three publications, a number of exhibitions, and the historic photo platform History In Progress Uganda. Her projects always concern the relation we have to the other, and the ways that photography can – or can not – visualize them.

Archive materials – texts, photos, official documents – play an important role in all of Stultiens's projects. For The Sequel Stultiens took the work pf Paul Julien and her own photography in Africa as her starting point. Stultiens places Julien's work, which sometimes seems to testify to colonial arrogance and prejudices, and other times to doubts about the significance of his own perceptions, in an historical perspective. She sought contact with historians in a number of the countries where Julien worked, and on the basis of their comments she herself photographed Nigeria, Uganda and Liberia. The result is work in which we become conscious of our gaze as an outsider and are challenged to reflect on it, while because of this approach the photos sometimes give away something that slips past us in a superficial examination. This presentation is the beginning of a larger research project involving the value of Paul Julien's work for today's Africa, and for the non-African viewer.

Andrea Stultiens (b. Netherlands, 1974) studied photographic design at the HKU, Utrecht School of the Arts and photography at Post-St. Joost in Breda. She took her MA in the Masters Photographic Studies at Leiden University. She is not only a photographer, but collects related material and reflects – through her own and found images and texts – on the way in which we visualize ourselves and others. Since 2007 Stultiens has worked primarily in Africa, and in particular in Uganda. In 2011 she was the initiator for the platform History In Progress Uganda, which collects and shares historic photos from and about Uganda, to provide them with stories in an attempt to nuance the historiography of that country. Stultiens has published several photo books and is an instructor and researcher at the Minerva Academy in Groningen.

Andrea Stultiens >>

  • Andrea Stultiens

    MUCH HAS CHANGED (1932-2013)
    photo: Paul Julien

  • Andrea Stultiens

    MUCH HAS CHANGED (1932-2013)
    photo: Paul Julien

  • Andrea Stultiens

    MUCH HAS CHANGED (1932-2013)

  • Andrea Stultiens

    MUCH HAS CHANGED (1932-2013)

Lidwien van der Ven

Lidwien van der Ven

DOCUMENT (2007) / DOCUMENT (II) (2013)

Of the photographers in The Sequel, Lidwien van de Ven best fits the category of  autonomous artist. Her work lies on the line between current events and her free interpretation of them, and is generally shown in the form of very large installations, in an art context. Since the late 1990s Van de Ven has focused on themes involving politics and religion, and since 2000 her work has increasingly been oriented to current developments in society. She poses philosophical questions about the medium of photography, about reality in the internet era, about visibility and invisibility, and about the way in which journalism mediates between reality and the representation of it.

Prior to 2007 Van de Ven had worked for long periods in the Middle East. There she was a witness to the pre-9/11 era, but also to the political and social impact of the Bush administrations' policy in the aftermath of the attack on the Twin Towers. This resulted in the 2007 installation and series ‘document’, which was presented at Documenta 12 in Kassel.

For The Sequel Van de Ven returned to the Middle East, and in particular Cairo, in  Egypt, after years of absence. Since the revolution in 2011 radical changes have taken place, and developments are continuing daily, as this is being written. In addition, she worked at the Zaatari refugee camp in Jordan, on the border with Syria, and in Istanbul, just after the outbreak of police violence that began with the intended  clearance of Gezi Park. For The Sequel Van de Ven has made a new installation in which she brings together images from these places.

It is primarily street scenes with graffiti that are to be seen in the installation document (II). Since the start of the revolution in 2011 graffiti have played a prominent role in the developments, not only as a means of expression, but also to instruct about the events. As though to create a constantly changing canvas, photos taken from digital sources such as mobile phones, TV and internet are copied onto the walls of the city, along with commentary, to make people aware of what is happening there.

In addition Van de Ven asked the activist Egyptian collective Kazeboon ('Liars') to make a video ‘for foreigners’. Kazeboon produces simple videos of TV and YouTube material that bluntly expose the falsehoods and contradictions in the statements of authorities such as the army or the Muslim Brotherhood, with the intention of explaining things to the population and raising doubts about their incontrovertible values – like trust in the army – and forcing them to think for themselves. The videos are shown in public space in Egypt, generally on a white sheet, using electricity tapped from a street light.
In the video for The Sequel they provide background for the turbulent events since Morsi was deposed by the army, and pose the central question of how to see these developments in the light of democracy.

Like the graffiti and the videos by Kazeboon, Van de Ven's work forms a reflection on what was originally intended with word ‘document’, derived from the Latin ‘docere’: to show, to instruct, or provide evidence.

Lidwien van de Ven (b. Netherlands, 1963) lives and works in Rotterdam and Berlin. Venues where her work has been seen include the Busan Biënnale (South Korea, 2012), Documenta 12 (Germany, 2007), and during the Sydney Biënnale (Australia, 2006). For her photography and installations she has received the prize from the Amsterdam Arts Council, the Charlotte Köhler Prize, the Maria Austria Award, and the French Culture Stipendium.

Lidwien van de Ven is represented by Galerie Paul Andriesse (Amsterdam).

Noorderlicht gratefully thanks Galerie Paul Andriesse for the generous loan of the exhibition ‘document’ by Lidwien van de Ven (2007).

Lidwien van der Ven >>

  • Lidwien van de Ven

    DOCUMENT (2007) / DOCUMENT (II) (2013)

  • Lidwien van de Ven

    DOCUMENT (2007) / DOCUMENT (II) (2013)

  • Lidwien van de Ven

    DOCUMENT (2007) / DOCUMENT (II) (2013)

  • Lidwien van de Ven

    DOCUMENT (2007) / DOCUMENT (II) (2013)

Xiaoxiao Xu

Xiaoxiao Xu

WENZHOU (2009) / THE WAY TO THE GOLDEN MOUNTAIN (2013)

In 1999, as a teenager, Xiaoxiao Xu moved from China to The Netherlands. Photography became her antidote to the isolation that she felt, a means for telling stories and making clear what it was that occupied her.

In 2009 Xu photographed the city from which she and her parents had come. Wenzhou is a large port city in the eastern province of Zhejiang, with a population of three million. Xu was overwhelmed by the combination of memories and  contemporary experiences. She could identify with the city, but at the same time felt herself to be an outsider – just as she did in The Netherlands. This resulted in WENZHOU, a series that shows the city as a personal and emotional eexprience.

THE WAY TO THE GOLDEN MOUNTAIN is Xu’s follow-up project. She travelled to the emigration towns around Wenzhou – a region from which many of the Chinese in The Netherlands came, and also the site of the village where Xu was born. The emigration towns, she discovered, have changed greatly since her departure. There is no longer any agriculture, and the river has been filled in to build a motorway. The quiet, tranquil village of Xu’s memories is now comprised of concrete high-rises and villas. The higher the house, the greater the prestige.

Xu made contact with emigrants in The Netherlands, who had generally come to Europe in the 1960s, '70s and '80s for economic reasons. They nourished the dream of the 'golden mountain' by sending money home, without telling about the hard work and long hours. Inspired by the dream of a better life, most of the young people have left the emigration towns. In China Xu made photos of those who had stayed behind and their surroundings. At the same time she investigated the memories from her childhood. A century after the first Chinese set foot in The Netherlands, Xu once again plunged into her own history. The result is personal and universal at the same time.

When she was 14 Xiaoxiao Xu (b. China, 1984) emigrated to The Netherlands with her parents, where in 2009 she graduated cum laude from the Photo Academy in Amsterdam. She was twice nominated for the Joop Swart Masterclass at World Press Photo, and as a rising talent won both De Fotoprijs and the Photo Academy Award. Seeking a balance between the two cultures in which she grew up, she uses photography as a means of investigating her own identity.

Xiaoxiao Xu >>

  • Xiaoxiao Xu

    THE WAY TO THE GOLDEN MOUNTAIN (2013)

  • Xiaoxiao Xu

    WENZHOU (2009)

  • Xiaoxiao Xu

    WENZHOU (2009)

  • Xiaoxiao Xu

    WENZHOU (2009) / THE WAY TO THE GOLDEN MOUNTAIN (2013)

  • Xiaoxiao Xu

    THE WAY TO THE GOLDEN MOUNTAIN (2013)