Overview participating photographers

Sonja Braas

Sonja Braas

The Quiet of Dissolution (2005-2010)

The phenomenon of a natural disaster can not be viewed apart from the presence of people. The destructive forces inherent in nature are essential for the development and evolution of the landscape, while man has a vital interest in controlling nature and bending it to his will. The images of THE QUIET OF DISSOLUTION, staged by Braas in her studio, deal with this contradiction, placing culture and order over against nature and chaos.

  • Blizzard


Alejandro Chaskielberg

Alejandro Chaskielberg

Turkana (2011)

Alejandro Chaskielberg (Argentina, 1977) began his career as a photojournalist for various local newspapers and magazines. After studying industrial design and photography, in 2000 he became director of photography at the National Film Institute in Buenos Aires. These duties have in no way reduced Chaskielberg’s output as a photographer and documentarist. He is presently involved with the Noorderlicht project The Sweet and Sour Story of Sugar. His first monograph, La Creciente, appeared recently.

  • The Dreaming Family

    Elisabeth Ekatapan and her family sleep under the stars in Northern Turkana. Because of the continuous droughts that affect the region her herd of 55 goats has died, cutting off her main source of income.

Sumit Dayal

Sumit Dayal

Vanishing Islands (2008)

The Sundarbans, the largest mangrove swamps in the world and a UNESCO World Heritage Site, are under threat from rising sea levels. Sumit Dayal photographed the inhabitants of this area, who are being forced to move inland because their islands are being swallowed by the water. Four islands have disappeared into the sea in the last quarter century, leaving 6000 families homeless. Other islands, including Sagar, the largest island, are rapidly seeing their size decrease.

  • Bhagadar Mandal

    2008

  • Firoza Bibi

    2008

James Whitlow Delano

James Whitlow Delano

Living with Volcanos: Giving Life and Taking It (2010)

Volcanos have two faces. Eruptions bring death and destruction, as seen in 2010 when Mount Merapi in Indonesia claimed 324 lives during the worst eruption in a century. But at the same time volcanic soil provides a wealth of minerals that are necessary for agriculture. It is from that fact that volcanos encouraged the rise of kingdoms, such as the Majapahit empire on Java. Living around volcanos is a constant process of give and take.

  • Untitled

    A rice farmer stands watches the biggest eruption of Merapi volcano in over a century. The death toll has risen to 324 people. Muntilan, Java, Indonesia.

  • Untitled

    Women doing the laundry in a river that has been silted up with volcanic ash. At the same place the ash has weighed down lush tropical foliage almost like a heavy spring snowfall. Muntilan, Java, Indonesia.

Nigel Dickinson

Nigel Dickinson

French Forests After the Great Storms (2000-2005)

In December, 1999, two massive storms raced across France, that destroyed 8 percent of its woodlands. Woods which were planted and managed by man were relatively harder hit. A year later Nigel Dickinson photographed the damage. Five years later he once again photographed the woods, to record the differences in the recovery of the woodlands that were being permitted to restore themselves naturally and those where human interventions were being made to encourage their recovery.

  • Untitled


  • Untitled


Wyatt Gallery

Wyatt Gallery

Tent Life: Haiti (Haiti, 2010)

Two months after the disastrous earthquake that struck Haiti on 12 January. 2010, Wyatt Gallery went to Port-au-Prince with five fellow artists to do volunteer work and record the consequences of the disaster. What impressed him was the resilience of the people. Seven months later he returned to photograph life in the gigantic tent camps – cities in themselves. He did portraits of the people there who, thanks to their inner strength, were able to keep going in the midst of a humanitarian crisis.

  • Girl In White Tent. Delmas 31, Port au Prince, 2010.


  • Blue Tent Interior. Airport Camp, Port au Prince, 2010.


Michel Huneault

Michel Huneault

Water Memories (canada, 2011)

Each spring, as the snow melts, many villages and cities in Quebec are at risk of flooding. In 2011 it was the turn of Venise-en-Québec, which lies on the banks of Lake Champlain. More than three thousand homes and businesses were damaged, and over a thousand residents had to be evacuated. The diptychs of WATER MEMORIES show the extent of the flooding, and the clean-up which followed. The core of the problem is the ambivalent relationship between man and water, Huneault says. Water attracts us, but at the same time remains an unpredictable force of nature.

  • Untitled


  • Untitled


Massimo Mastrorillo

Massimo Mastrorillo - Massimo Mastrorillo

Temporary Landscape

On the 6th of April 2009 the historical centre of the Italian town of L'Aquila was severely damaged by an earthquake. In his work, which deals with L’Aquila and the consequences of the earthquake, Massimo Mastrorillo shows us how the landscape constantly changes in an emergency situation, without any serious long-term planning lying behind its evolution. Frozen in images these temporary landscapes look everlasting.

  • Untitled

    Landfill of debris coming from the rubbles of the city of L'Aquila in the aftermath of the earthquake. 2009.

  • Untitled

    Special inactive debris dump in the neighboring town of Barisciano. 2010-2011.

Katsumi Omori

Katsumi Omori

Everything Happens for the First Time (Japan, 2011)

One of the central events each spring in Japan is hanami, the brief period when the cherry trees blossom. Katsumi Omori has captured that event for the last decade. It was obvious that in the spring of 2011, after the earthquake, tsunami and nuclear incident, he would go from Tokyo in the direction of the disaster-struck Fukushima in search of the blossoms. His images contain suggestions of things that people can not see, but which ares nonetheless present: anxiety, radiation and hope for the future.

  • Untitled


  • Untitled


Miti Ruangkritya

Miti Ruangkritya

Imagining Flood (Thailand, 2011)

One of the central events each spring in Japan is hanami, the brief period when the cherry trees blossom. Katsumi Omori has captured that event for the last decade. It was obvious that in the spring of 2011, after the earthquake, tsunami and nuclear incident, he would go from Tokyo in the direction of the disaster-struck Fukushima in search of the blossoms. His images contain suggestions of things that people can not see, but which ares nonetheless present: anxiety, radiation and hope for the future.

  • Untitled


  • Untitled


Sarker Protick

Sarker Protick - Protick Sarker

Of River and Lost Lands (2011-2012)

The river gives and takes. When the monsoon comes, it swells and swallows whole villages. Anything and everything is carried away with it – from gigantic, holy trees to ordinary garbage. Protick Sarker investigates life along the river, life that is totally dependent on the water, but is equally threatened by it.

  • Untitled

  • Untitled

S. Gayle Stevens

S. Gayle Stevens - S. Gayle Stevens

Pass (2009-2011)

In English, ‘to pass’ can mean ‘to go by’, or ‘to die’ or ‘to go from one state to another’. Pass Christian was also the name of an artists’ colony in Mississippi that was destroyed by the furious waters during Hurricane Katrina. Only 500 of the 8000 houses survived the disaster, and many residents never returned. In PASS S. Gayle Stevens records the ruins of the artists’ village in small, intimate images, shot with a pinhole camera.

  • Foundations, Cedar Avenue and Fir, 2009


  • Pool, Cedar Avenu, 2009


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