Overview participating photographers

Karin Borghouts

Karin Borghouts

Through the Looking Glass (2001-2005)

Strip away the backgrounds in zoos and amusement parks of people and animals, and what is left are artificial reconstructions of wild nature. Just as a photograph is a memory of a moment, this fake nature is only a memory of real nature, which we normally know only from photographs and films. By recording these backdrops Karin Borghouts creates a memory of a memory. In doing so, she poses questions about the nature of photography and our ideal images of nature.    

  • Wawel, Krakow, Poland, 2003


  • Zoo de Vincennes, Paris, France, 2003


Ignasi Cunill

Ignasi Cunill

Urban Landscapes (2010)

The way in which we see the landscape is to a great extent determined by the words that we use to describe it and the aesthetic values that we project on it. Ignasi Cunill sees the landscape not only as a physical fact, but also as a mirror of our soul. In photos of landscape elements in an urban environment, where our ideas about nature and culture encounter each other, he plays with the delicate balance between words, mental images and photography. In the process he lays bare our ideas about what is natural and what is man-made.

  • Untitled


Erwan Fichou

Erwan Fichou

Miradors (Mexico, 2010)

Photography is not so much a matter of recording reality, but rather creates a narrative framework in which interaction and projection play a large role. We live in a world of images, Fichou says, but these images precede a supposed reality that we construct in our mind. For his series MIRADORS Fichou had trees along the streets of Mexico City trimmed by nurserymen, after which he asked people to climb into the trees to pose for the photos. Reality, or not?

  • Arleen2


Eric Jan van de Geer

Eric Jan van de Geer - Eric Jan van de Geer

Private Landscape II (2009)

The photographer Eric Jan van de Geer is interested in commonplace things that usually escape our notice. In PRIVATE LANDSCAPE II he recorded front gardens during the night hours. The photos are shot on landscape format Polaroid film. This was not from nostalgic considerations, but for the restrictions that the material brings with it, which force the artist to make hard choices.

  • Untitled


  • Untitled


Kate Greene

Kate Greene

Anomalous Phenomena (2011)

Inspired by 19th century occult photography, the symbolism of 17th century Dutch still-lifes, and the obsessive character of botanical catalogues, Kate Greene photographs carefully constructed natural tableaux and the way that landscapes change under the influence of light and time. She tries to build a bridge between the scientific perception of the physical world and the way in which people experience that world.

  • Hedera helix (English Ivy)


  • Philodendron bipinnatifidum (Philodendron)


Jonathan Groeneweg

Jonathan Groeneweg

The Nature of Urbanity (2012)

The garden is a metaphor for the ways in which people have freed themselves from the wilderness and began shaping the world around them according to their own insights. With his aerial photos of gardens – mathematical and controlled at a macro level, but no less chaotic at the level of the foliage – Jonathan Groeneweg touches on long-running discussions about the landscape and urban development. Our changing perception of nature has direct influence on the way in which we see ourselves, and the ways in which we deal with nature.

  • Bleecker Street CO-OP Garden, 2011

    (Linear Photo-Panoramic, Composite 10 Images)

Sabine Haubitz & Stefanie Zoche

Sabine Haubitz & Stefanie Zoche

Tropical Island (2004)

In 2004 the Halle CargoLifter near Brandenburg was converted into an artificial tropical paradise with a rain forest, swimming pools and a heated beach. Sabine Haubitz and Stefanie Zoche recorded the transformation, so that one could see what elements are necessary to suggest a tropical setting. It's an illusion that demands a vast expenditure of energy.

  • Großer Pool (big pool)


  • Palmeninsel I (palm island I)


Rob Wetzer & Sjoerd Knibbeler

Rob Wetzer & Sjoerd Knibbeler

Typology (2009-present)

Although we continue to cherish a desire for wild nature, man has become used to the complete adaptation of the natural environment to his wishes. Bonsai trees are on the one hand an extreme form of control that is exercised over nature, but behind the growing of bonsai lies a yearning for knowledge of and contact with nature. In that sense they are a metaphor for our search for a different relation with the natural environment.

  • Untitled #4


  • Untitled #1


Cristophe Maout

Cristophe Maout

Printemps (France, 2004-2010)

Often the planting in an urban environment – the greenery in planters in front of a building, the trees along a road – has little more than a symbolic or decorative function. But in his series PRINTEMPS Christophe Maout has the plants take centre stage. By using a very short depth of field, the surroundings fall away and the cherry blossoms, irises and other plants become the stars. All the images were made by Maout in Paris and its vicinity, without any digital manipulation.

  • Untitled


  • Untitled


Jamie Maxtone-Graham

Jamie Maxtone-Graham

The Desiring Garden (Vietnam, 2011)

Within the highly urbanized environment of Hanoi, Jamie Maxtone-Graham captures the reactions of people who encounter a staged garden full of flowers, fruit, vegetables and animals that were bought in the markets of Vietnam’s capital. The result is a Rousseauesque game with our ideas of the exotic, in which the logic of the location, and the photographic document itself, are undermined.

  • Adieux au le jardin d'Indochine


  • Ritual


Ardine Nelson

Ardine Nelson

Green Spaces (2004-2009)

Ardine Nelson (United States, 1948) uses both traditional and experimental photographic techniques in her work; years ago she was one of the first to experiment with the Polaroid process. Her work has often been exhibited in the United States and other countries, and she has received many working grants. She is professor emeritus in the photography programme of the Department of Art at Ohio State University.

  • An dem Zschierbach II, Dresden 2004


  • Erholung I, Dresden 2004


  • Ostra Höhe, Dresden 2004


Yan Preston

Yan Preston

Forest (China, 2011)

What is Utopia, and what does it cost to build it? FOREST shows how they are trying to construct a utopia from scratch in the Chinese city of Chongqing. The goal is a model city incorporating five ‘ideals’. A woods is one of them. But rather than planting trees and patiently waiting for them to grow, full-grown trees are being uprooted for a sort of prefab forest. The promise of a beautiful future is thus being realized through methods that strain the resources of both culture and nature.

  • Untitled


  • Untitled


Irina Rozovsky

Irina Rozovsky

In Plain Air

When it was designed in 1867 Prospect Park, in the heart of Brooklyn, New York, was the first American public park, accessible for all social classes. In her long-running project IN PLAIN AIR Irina Rozovsky photographs the park so that the surrounding city is no longer visible. She underscores the function of the park as an oasis of peace in hectic urban life, a place where people, albeit for only a short time, can come in contact with nature and can experience private, transcendent moments.

  • Muslim Fisherwomen


  • Man In Bush


Traer Scott

Traer Scott

Natural History (2009-2011)

During the summers when she was nine and ten, Traer Scott spent her time in the local natural history museum. Her mother worked there as a volunteer, and wanted to save on the cost of child minders. Since that time Scott has cherished an enormous affection for everything that is old and mysterious. In her series NATURAL HISTORY she brings the dead and the living – the collection and the often young visitors – together.

  • Hunting Dogs

    2009

  • Gazelle

    2010

Andy Sewell

Andy Sewell

The Heath

Hampstead Heath was once part of London’s rural surroundings. Today it is a green oasis in the midst of a busy urban landscape. Andy Sewell regularly wanders in The Heath in search of nature, fully realizing that the area was shaped, and is maintained by the hand of man. His series THE HEATH is an investigation of what, precisely, nature is, but also of what the American biologist E.O. Wilson called ‘biophilia’ – the attraction you feel to the natural, without knowing exactly why.

  • Untitled


  • Untitled


Anastasia Taylor-Lind

Anastasia Taylor-Lind - Anastasia Taylor-Lind

Gaza Zoos

It is ironic that a people who are confined themselves should confine and exhibit animals. The residents of Gaza are conscious of this irony. A zoo is a small prison, they say, and Gaza is a big zoo. Still, they do not identify with the animals, which have to do without names, and are often treated heartlessly. There are several zoos in Gaza, but they are all money-losing propositions. The only one who makes money on the zoos is the animal trader and smuggler Abu Nadal-Khalid, who for a substantial sum can get you any animal you want.

  • Untitled

    Mahmod Berghote stands with one of Marah Zoo's world famous painted donkeys. The zoo’s two white donkeys caused an international media frenzy when Mahmod and his brother first spent three days painting stripes onto them using black hair dye. Unable to find an animal trader to bring a real zebra through the tunnels from Egypt, the Bargote family decided to make a fake pair using white donkeys. The story was reported all over the world as a feel good news piece and often used as an example of the Palestinian peoples resourcefulness during the siege of Gaza. Gaza City.

  • Untitled

    Animal-trader Abu Nadal holds a gazelle that he has smuggled through the tunnels from Egypt, at the shed in Rafah where he keeps his animals before they are sold on to zoos in Gaza.

Kurt Tong

Kurt Tong

Memories, Dreams; Interrupted (2009-2010)

Scientists have sometimes suggested that memories are stored like JPEGs. They are broken up and saved in pieces, which are only put back together when they are called up. The missing data is filled in by the brain. Kurt Tong took his pictures in a botanical garden, in a large format and under ever-changing lighting conditions. He applied different techniques to destroy the information in the image, after which he scanned the images with scanners at different settings. Ultimately he assembled an image again from the results, in the same way that the memory makes a complete image again from fragments.

  • Untitled


  • Untitled


Graeme Williams

Graeme Williams

Objects of Reminiscence (2009-2012)

Scientists have sometimes suggested that memories are stored like JPEGs. They are broken up and saved in pieces, which are only put back together when they are called up. The missing data is filled in by the brain. Kurt Tong took his pictures in a botanical garden, in a large format and under ever-changing lighting conditions. He applied different techniques to destroy the information in the image, after which he scanned the images with scanners at different settings. Ultimately he assembled an image again from the results, in the same way that the memory makes a complete image again from fragments.

  • The guest lounge at The Lodge in Lilongwe. Malawi, 2009.


  • East London Airport departures hall. South Africa, 2006.


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