Photographers / Traces & Omens

Traces & Omens

Christophe Agou

Christophe Agou

FACING SILENCE (2001-2002)

Christophe Agou had lived in New York since 1992. After the events of 9/11 he felt the strong desire to return to the Forez, the region of France where he had been born. Once back, Agou was gripped by the authentic life of the local farmers. 'The more I saw of it', the photographer says, 'the more I wanted to immerse myself in the silence that appeared to surround their way of life.' From that time he traveled regularly to the region to record the life of these traditional farmers in photographs, audiotapes and video. 'The echo of countless generations can be heard in their lives.' That, Agou says, explains his fascination. 'At the same time, you see that their way of life is threatened with extinction.'

Christophe Agou >>

  • FACING SILENCE (2001-2002)

    Christophe Agou had lived in New York since 1992. After the events of 9/11 he felt the strong desire to return to the Forez, the region of France where he had been born. Once back, Agou was gripped by the authentic life of the local farmers. 'The more I saw of it', the photographer says, 'the more I wanted to immerse myself in the silence that appeared to surround their way of life.' From that time he traveled regularly to the region to record the life of these traditional farmers in photographs, audiotapes and video. 'The echo of countless generations can be heard in their lives.' That, Agou says, explains his fascination. 'At the same time, you see that their way of life is threatened with extinction.'

  • FACING SILENCE (2001-2002)

  • FACING SILENCE (2001-2002)

  • FACING SILENCE (2001-2002)

  • FACING SILENCE (2001-2002)

David Almeida

David Almeida

DISPLACEMENT (2004)

Displacement (2004) shows ordinary household effects that have been thrown out on the streets of South Beach, a coastal community in the American state of Florida. Generally they are objects that no one notices, but now that they are outside their normal context they take on a new, surrealistic dimension. Homeless, having lost their original function in the living room or bathroom, they await a new use. Possibly they will be picked up by the garbage truck, or perhaps, because of their relatively good condition, they will be used again in another context. Even as we know nothing of their background, we can only guess at their future, which perhaps includes a whole new lifecycle.

David Almeida >>

  • DISPLACEMENT (2004)

    Displacement (2004) shows ordinary household effects that have been thrown out on the streets of South Beach, a coastal community in the American state of Florida. Generally they are objects that no one notices, but now that they are outside their normal context they take on a new, surrealistic dimension. Homeless, having lost their original function in the living room or bathroom, they await a new use. Possibly they will be picked up by the garbage truck, or perhaps, because of their relatively good condition, they will be used again in another context. Even as we know nothing of their background, we can only guess at their future, which perhaps includes a whole new lifecycle.

  • DISPLACEMENT (2004)

  • DISPLACEMENT (2004)

  • DISPLACEMENT (2004)

  • DISPLACEMENT (2004)

Harvey Benge

Harvey Benge

39 TREES (1997-2004)

Since 1997 Harvey Benge has been photographing trees in the cities he visits all over the world, such as New York, Paris, Milan, Budapest and Amsterdam. The condition is that the tree shows signs of human intervention. For instance, a tree he photographed in Berlin, in what was once the Communist side of the city, bears a carved heart with the date 1984. A tree in Hanoi bears a simple spray-painted question mark. These signs in 39 Trees (1997-2004), or as Benge calls them 'traces and scars of the past', call up questions - questions about who made them, when, and why. 'I suspect that many of these signs have survived the people, events and relations from which they came,' says Benge. 'They let the past penetrate the present.'

Harvey Benge >>

  • 39 TREES (1997-2004)

    Since 1997 Harvey Benge has been photographing trees in the cities he visits all over the world, such as New York, Paris, Milan, Budapest and Amsterdam. The condition is that the tree shows signs of human intervention. For instance, a tree he photographed in Berlin, in what was once the Communist side of the city, bears a carved heart with the date 1984. A tree in Hanoi bears a simple spray-painted question mark. These signs in 39 Trees (1997-2004), or as Benge calls them 'traces and scars of the past', call up questions - questions about who made them, when, and why. 'I suspect that many of these signs have survived the people, events and relations from which they came,' says Benge. 'They let the past penetrate the present.'

  • 39 TREES (1997-2004)

  • 39 TREES (1997-2004)

  • 39 TREES (1997-2004)

  • 39 TREES (1997-2004)

Pep Bonet

Pep Bonet

FAITH IN CHAOS (2002-2003)

It was said of the rebels in Sierra Leone, 'If they'd have gotten their hands on God, they'd have killed Him too.' The civil war which raged there from 1991 to 2001 is counted as one of the bloodiest in African history. Tens of thousands of civilians were killed, and hundreds of thousands more raped, mutilated, tortured or enslaved. Victims who had an arm or leg hacked off still dominate the street scene. Directly after the war was over, Pep Bonet went to Sierra Leone. In Faith in Chaos (2002-2003) he documented how the population, physically and psychologically scarred by their extreme experiences, sought to rebuild their lives. 'The determination of these victims of war and poverty leaves us all in the dust,' he says.

Pep Bonet >>

  • FAITH IN CHAOS (2002-2003)

    It was said of the rebels in Sierra Leone, 'If they'd have gotten their hands on God, they'd have killed Him too.' The civil war which raged there from 1991 to 2001 is counted as one of the bloodiest in African history. Tens of thousands of civilians were killed, and hundreds of thousands more raped, mutilated, tortured or enslaved. Victims who had an arm or leg hacked off still dominate the street scene. Directly after the war was over, Pep Bonet went to Sierra Leone. In Faith in Chaos (2002-2003) he documented how the population, physically and psychologically scarred by their extreme experiences, sought to rebuild their lives. 'The determination of these victims of war and poverty leaves us all in the dust,' he says.

  • FAITH IN CHAOS (2002-2003)

  • FAITH IN CHAOS (2002-2003)

  • FAITH IN CHAOS (2002-2003)

  • FAITH IN CHAOS (2002-2003)

Kai Bornhöft

Kai Bornhöft

TRUE COLOURS (2003-2004)

The work of Kai Bornhöft is concerned with the escalating changes in Western society. It is inspired by the popular idea that it is indeed beneficial to surrender every aspect of life to the principles of: efficiency, technology and rationalism. Through his photographs he shows the impact this process has on the conditions of life, guided by questions concerning man's estrangement from nature, the progressive mechanization in both our work and daily life, as well as the individualization of human beings and its subsequent consequences. The pictures from the series True Colours (2003-2004) were taken at various locations of the aquaculture industry in Europe in 2003-2004. The industry offers an allegory, as already today the production process takes place in a circular rhythm of breeding, growing and harvesting fish, under full scientific control. Furthermore this industry will gain an increasingly important role in the future due to the exhaustion of stocks of wild fish.

Kai Bornhöft >>

  • TRUE COLOURS (2003-2004)

    The work of Kai Bornhöft is concerned with the escalating changes in Western society. It is inspired by the popular idea that it is indeed beneficial to surrender every aspect of life to the principles of: efficiency, technology and rationalism. Through his photographs he shows the impact this process has on the conditions of life, guided by questions concerning man's estrangement from nature, the progressive mechanization in both our work and daily life, as well as the individualization of human beings and its subsequent consequences. The pictures from the series True Colours (2003-2004) were taken at various locations of the aquaculture industry in Europe in 2003-2004. The industry offers an allegory, as already today the production process takes place in a circular rhythm of breeding, growing and harvesting fish, under full scientific control. Furthermore this industry will gain an increasingly important role in the future due to the exhaustion of stocks of wild fish.

  • TRUE COLOURS (2003-2004)

  • TRUE COLOURS (2003-2004)

  • TRUE COLOURS (2003-2004)

  • TRUE COLOURS (2003-2004)

João Castilho

João Castilho

UNDERWATER LANDSCAPE (2002-2006)

Since the 1970s the Jequitinhonha Valley, one of the poorest regions of Brazil, has had to cope with a rigidly imposed landscape politics. One of the most radical plans is the construction of a dam that will leave a large part of the valley under water. As a result of this a large part of the scarce fertile land in the region will disappear and 1150 farm families, split over 42 communities, will be forced to move. Many have never been outside of the valley. The loss of diamond prospecting, an important source of income for these families, will not be financially compensated, because it is an illegal activity.

João Castilho >>

  • UNDERWATER LANDSCAPE (2002-2006)

    Since the 1970s the Jequitinhonha Valley, one of the poorest regions of Brazil, has had to cope with a rigidly imposed landscape politics. One of the most radical plans is the construction of a dam that will leave a large part of the valley under water. As a result of this a large part of the scarce fertile land in the region will disappear and 1150 farm families, split over 42 communities, will be forced to move. Many have never been outside of the valley. The loss of diamond prospecting, an important source of income for these families, will not be financially compensated, because it is an illegal activity.

  • UNDERWATER LANDSCAPE (2002-2006)

Pedro David

Pedro David

UNDERWATER LANDSCAPE (2002-2006)

Since the 1970s the Jequitinhonha Valley, one of the poorest regions of Brazil, has had to cope with a rigidly imposed landscape politics. One of the most radical plans is the construction of a dam that will leave a large part of the valley under water. As a result of this a large part of the scarce fertile land in the region will disappear and 1150 farm families, split over 42 communities, will be forced to move. Many have never been outside of the valley. The loss of diamond prospecting, an important source of income for these families, will not be financially compensated, because it is an illegal activity.

Pedro David >>

  • UNDERWATER LANDSCAPE (2002-2006)

    Since the 1970s the Jequitinhonha Valley, one of the poorest regions of Brazil, has had to cope with a rigidly imposed landscape politics. One of the most radical plans is the construction of a dam that will leave a large part of the valley under water. As a result of this a large part of the scarce fertile land in the region will disappear and 1150 farm families, split over 42 communities, will be forced to move. Many have never been outside of the valley. The loss of diamond prospecting, an important source of income for these families, will not be financially compensated, because it is an illegal activity.

  • UNDERWATER LANDSCAPE (2002-2006)

Pedro Motta

Pedro Motta

UNDERWATER LANDSCAPE (2002-2006)

Since the 1970s the Jequitinhonha Valley, one of the poorest regions of Brazil, has had to cope with a rigidly imposed landscape politics. One of the most radical plans is the construction of a dam that will leave a large part of the valley under water. As a result of this a large part of the scarce fertile land in the region will disappear and 1150 farm families, split over 42 communities, will be forced to move. Many have never been outside of the valley. The loss of diamond prospecting, an important source of income for these families, will not be financially compensated, because it is an illegal activity.

Pedro Motta >>

  • UNDERWATER LANDSCAPE (2002-2006)

    Since the 1970s the Jequitinhonha Valley, one of the poorest regions of Brazil, has had to cope with a rigidly imposed landscape politics. One of the most radical plans is the construction of a dam that will leave a large part of the valley under water. As a result of this a large part of the scarce fertile land in the region will disappear and 1150 farm families, split over 42 communities, will be forced to move. Many have never been outside of the valley. The loss of diamond prospecting, an important source of income for these families, will not be financially compensated, because it is an illegal activity.

  • UNDERWATER LANDSCAPE (2002-2006)

Stéphane Duroy

Stéphane Duroy

L'EUROPE DU SILENCE (2000)

From 1979 to 1997 the French photographer Stéphane Duroy traveled constantly around Europe. He primarily wanted to understand how a civilized continent could have so surrendered itself to war and violence. He found the best illustration of this antithesis during the Cold War in Berlin. Here he perceived the two faces of the German people, 'the one extremely refined, the other that of a monster'. It made him decide to research further in the DDR and the rest of the East Bloc, where the advanced Weimar culture and Auschwitz could exist alongside each other. There he encountered a region where time seemed to have stood still. Duroy ended L'Europe du Silence (2000) in his homeland, France, in the landscape that still bears the scars of the massive slaughter that took place there during the First World War.

Stéphane Duroy >>

  • L'EUROPE DU SILENCE (2000)

    From 1979 to 1997 the French photographer Stéphane Duroy traveled constantly around Europe. He primarily wanted to understand how a civilized continent could have so surrendered itself to war and violence. He found the best illustration of this antithesis during the Cold War in Berlin. Here he perceived the two faces of the German people, 'the one extremely refined, the other that of a monster'. It made him decide to research further in the DDR and the rest of the East Bloc, where the advanced Weimar culture and Auschwitz could exist alongside each other. There he encountered a region where time seemed to have stood still. Duroy ended L'Europe du Silence (2000) in his homeland, France, in the landscape that still bears the scars of the massive slaughter that took place there during the First World War.

  • L'EUROPE DU SILENCE (2000)

  • L'EUROPE DU SILENCE (2000)

  • L'EUROPE DU SILENCE (2000)

  • L'EUROPE DU SILENCE (2000)

Adrienne van Eekelen

Adrienne van Eekelen

RAPHAËLA (1994-2004)

Over the period of ten years, Adrienne van Eekelen photographed the girl Raphaëla and her physical development into a young woman. Van Eekelen conceived the project because she could no longer consciously recall how she herself had experienced the physical and emotional changes during her own growth process from a child to an adult. In doing this she wanted, she says, to have the courage to show something that 'is pure, honest and real' in these times. With the fullest confidence from Raphaëla and her mother she began the series, and RAPHAËLA (1994-2004) is now ready to be shown to the outside world. It was her decision to wait for this until Raphaëla was an adult, because according to her the project was 'vulnerable, fragile and intimate' for all involved.

Adrienne van Eekelen >>

  • RAPHAËLA (1994-2004)

    Over the period of ten years, Adrienne van Eekelen photographed the girl Raphaëla and her physical development into a young woman. Van Eekelen conceived the project because she could no longer consciously recall how she herself had experienced the physical and emotional changes during her own growth process from a child to an adult. In doing this she wanted, she says, to have the courage to show something that 'is pure, honest and real' in these times. With the fullest confidence from Raphaëla and her mother she began the series, and RAPHAËLA (1994-2004) is now ready to be shown to the outside world. It was her decision to wait for this until Raphaëla was an adult, because according to her the project was 'vulnerable, fragile and intimate' for all involved.

  • RAPHAËLA (1994-2004)

  • RAPHAËLA (1994-2004)

  • RAPHAËLA (1994-2004)

  • RAPHAËLA (1994-2004)

Joakim Eneroth

Joakim Eneroth

TESTIMONY (2004)

Since the People's Republic of China signed the UN treaty against torture in 1986, it has denied that it still employs torture. The declarations of Tibetans who have fled to India for political reasons indicate the opposite. Joakim Eneroth did portraits of a number of these refugees for Testimony (2004), together with the Chinese instruments of torture that one of them was able to smuggle out with him. In recent years China has executed more people than all other countries combined. International critique is often silenced in deference to economic interests. For example, a German firm is presently building a railway line in Tibet, and an Australian firm owns all the Tibetan gold mines. China has also been selected to organize the 2008 Olympic Games.

Joakim Eneroth >>

  • TESTIMONY (2004)

    Since the People's Republic of China signed the UN treaty against torture in 1986, it has denied that it still employs torture. The declarations of Tibetans who have fled to India for political reasons indicate the opposite. Joakim Eneroth did portraits of a number of these refugees for Testimony (2004), together with the Chinese instruments of torture that one of them was able to smuggle out with him. In recent years China has executed more people than all other countries combined. International critique is often silenced in deference to economic interests. For example, a German firm is presently building a railway line in Tibet, and an Australian firm owns all the Tibetan gold mines. China has also been selected to organize the 2008 Olympic Games.

  • TESTIMONY (2004)

  • TESTIMONY (2004)

  • TESTIMONY (2004)

  • TESTIMONY (2004)

Larry Fink

Larry Fink

THE FORBIDDEN PICTURES (2001)

Weimar artists such as George Grosz, Otto Dix and Max Beckman denounced the decadence of that period in critical, politically tinged paintings. In a contemporary variant, Larry Fink ridicules the political leaders of America. The photographs in The Forbidden Pictures (2001), originally intended for The New York Times Magazine, were made shortly before 9/11. After the attack on the Twin Towers, no magazine was willing to publish them any more. Only in 2004 could they be shown for the first time in America, which immediately led to a storm of protest. Particularly the hand of a George Bush lookalike on the breast of a model caused outrage. 'The woman should be seen as a metaphor for our foreign policy,' responded Fink, 'which consists of putting our hands where they don't belong and the imperious abuse of our power.'

Larry Fink >>

  • THE FORBIDDEN PICTURES (2001)

    Weimar artists such as George Grosz, Otto Dix and Max Beckman denounced the decadence of that period in critical, politically tinged paintings. In a contemporary variant, Larry Fink ridicules the political leaders of America. The photographs in The Forbidden Pictures (2001), originally intended for The New York Times Magazine, were made shortly before 9/11. After the attack on the Twin Towers, no magazine was willing to publish them any more. Only in 2004 could they be shown for the first time in America, which immediately led to a storm of protest. Particularly the hand of a George Bush lookalike on the breast of a model caused outrage. 'The woman should be seen as a metaphor for our foreign policy,' responded Fink, 'which consists of putting our hands where they don't belong and the imperious abuse of our power.'

  • THE FORBIDDEN PICTURES (2001)

  • THE FORBIDDEN PICTURES (2001)

  • THE FORBIDDEN PICTURES (2001)

Paul Fusco

Paul Fusco

CHERNOBYL RADIATION (1997)

In 1986 a nuclear reactor exploded at Chernobyl. One-hundred-ninety tons of radioactive material poisoned a quarter of the Russian population and the Russian landscape. The traces are still visible. Many Russians become ill from the radioactive materials that they ingest daily with their food and drinking water. A new generation has to contend with a whole range of physical, neurological and psychological disorders. Paul Fusco photographed daily life in the affected region for Chernobyl Radiation (1997). He concentrated primarily on the child care institutions in Minsk. Many babies that are so deformed that they are no longer wanted by their parents end up there. Although the nuclear reactor at Chernobyl is now encased in steel and concrete, it continues to leak radioactive materials.

Paul Fusco >>

  • CHERNOBYL RADIATION (1997)

    In 1986 a nuclear reactor exploded at Chernobyl. One-hundred-ninety tons of radioactive material poisoned a quarter of the Russian population and the Russian landscape. The traces are still visible. Many Russians become ill from the radioactive materials that they ingest daily with their food and drinking water. A new generation has to contend with a whole range of physical, neurological and psychological disorders. Paul Fusco photographed daily life in the affected region for Chernobyl Radiation (1997). He concentrated primarily on the child care institutions in Minsk. Many babies that are so deformed that they are no longer wanted by their parents end up there. Although the nuclear reactor at Chernobyl is now encased in steel and concrete, it continues to leak radioactive materials.

  • CHERNOBYL RADIATION (1997)

  • CHERNOBYL RADIATION (1997)

  • CHERNOBYL RADIATION (1997)

  • CHERNOBYL RADIATION (1997)

Stephen Gill

Stephen Gill

RUSSIAN WOMEN SMOKERS (2002)

Stephen Gill loves the beauty of the banal. For instance, he has produced a series on shopping carts, and photographed the back side of advertising billboards. For Russian Women Smokers (2002) he focused on discarded Russian cigarette butts. We will never know who smoked these cigarettes; only the lipstick on the filter betrays that they were smoked by women. These vestiges stimulated Gill's imagination, something which he hopes to accomplish with the viewer too with this series. According to Gill, 'Cigarette butts tell you little, but they start a thought process that may possibly bring you out to a face rather than an object.'

Stephen Gill >>

  • RUSSIAN WOMEN SMOKERS (2002)

    Stephen Gill loves the beauty of the banal. For instance, he has produced a series on shopping carts, and photographed the back side of advertising billboards. For Russian Women Smokers (2002) he focused on discarded Russian cigarette butts. We will never know who smoked these cigarettes; only the lipstick on the filter betrays that they were smoked by women. These vestiges stimulated Gill's imagination, something which he hopes to accomplish with the viewer too with this series. According to Gill, 'Cigarette butts tell you little, but they start a thought process that may possibly bring you out to a face rather than an object.'

  • RUSSIAN WOMEN SMOKERS (2002)

  • RUSSIAN WOMEN SMOKERS (2002)

  • RUSSIAN WOMEN SMOKERS (2002)

  • RUSSIAN WOMEN SMOKERS (2002)

Gladys

Gladys

CASA ORTIZ (1993)

The photo series Casa Ortiz (1993) was made in a house of the same name in Laredo, a small town on the border between the United States and Mexico. Originally Laredo was Mexican; presently it lies in the American state of Texas. Laredo is separated from Mexico by the Rio Grande river, which many Mexicans cross illegally to try their luck in America. Almost every night Casa Ortiz offers a view of the American border patrol in their hunt for illegal Mexican migrants. The French photographer Gladys produced this portrait of the classic mansion and the generations of women and children that live in it. Both appear to be prisoners of history, says Gladys. Within the historic atmosphere of Casa Ortiz, the residents conduct themselves as if they also lived in another era.

Gladys >>

  • CASA ORTIZ (1993)

    The photo series Casa Ortiz (1993) was made in a house of the same name in Laredo, a small town on the border between the United States and Mexico. Originally Laredo was Mexican; presently it lies in the American state of Texas. Laredo is separated from Mexico by the Rio Grande river, which many Mexicans cross illegally to try their luck in America. Almost every night Casa Ortiz offers a view of the American border patrol in their hunt for illegal Mexican migrants. The French photographer Gladys produced this portrait of the classic mansion and the generations of women and children that live in it. Both appear to be prisoners of history, says Gladys. Within the historic atmosphere of Casa Ortiz, the residents conduct themselves as if they also lived in another era.

  • CASA ORTIZ (1993)

  • CASA ORTIZ (1993)

  • CASA ORTIZ (1993)

  • CASA ORTIZ (1993)

Brigitte Grignet

Brigitte Grignet

HERE AND NOW (2000-2005)

Every day we see and hear an endless number of things. It is as if someone is telling us a story to which new details are constantly being added, and that goes on infinitely, according to Brigitte Grignet. Much of what we see and hear is lost, but some things - however trivial they may be - unconsciously attract our attention. Before Grignet can analyze why she had done so, she has already instinctively tripped the shutter release. In that way she records a world that unconsciously appeals to her - perhaps because of previous personal experiences, for instance from her youth. Together these moments in Here and Now (2000-2005) make up a universe of its own, and an extremely personal story of how we can experience places and moments - a sensation that we all recognize.

Brigitte Grignet >>

  • HERE AND NOW (2000-2005)

    Every day we see and hear an endless number of things. It is as if someone is telling us a story to which new details are constantly being added, and that goes on infinitely, according to Brigitte Grignet. Much of what we see and hear is lost, but some things - however trivial they may be - unconsciously attract our attention. Before Grignet can analyze why she had done so, she has already instinctively tripped the shutter release. In that way she records a world that unconsciously appeals to her - perhaps because of previous personal experiences, for instance from her youth. Together these moments in Here and Now (2000-2005) make up a universe of its own, and an extremely personal story of how we can experience places and moments - a sensation that we all recognize.

  • HERE AND NOW (2000-2005)

  • HERE AND NOW (2000-2005)

  • HERE AND NOW (2000-2005)

  • HERE AND NOW (2000-2005)

Bianca Gutberlet

Bianca Gutberlet

LUBBERLAND (2003)

Modern man wallows in luxury and abundance, observes Bianca Gutberlet. The number of provisions that are available to us is so great that it is impossible to use them all daily. They can only be consumed bit by bit. What could we still possibly want?, Gutberlet asked herself. In the 'garden of humanity' all dreams are fulfilled. She visualizes this in Lubberland (2003), which is comprised of environments which have been made by and for people. She bases the compositions and choice of colors on the presentations, as cheery as they are naive, that as a rule are found in travel guides and vacation brochures. Strongly accentuating the sweet colors reinforces the idea of modern society as one immense candy store, in which modern man can brazenly stuff himself. The promises that advertising holds up before us daily become reality for a moment in her photographs.

Bianca Gutberlet >>

  • LUBBERLAND (2003)

    Modern man wallows in luxury and abundance, observes Bianca Gutberlet. The number of provisions that are available to us is so great that it is impossible to use them all daily. They can only be consumed bit by bit. What could we still possibly want?, Gutberlet asked herself. In the 'garden of humanity' all dreams are fulfilled. She visualizes this in Lubberland (2003), which is comprised of environments which have been made by and for people. She bases the compositions and choice of colors on the presentations, as cheery as they are naive, that as a rule are found in travel guides and vacation brochures. Strongly accentuating the sweet colors reinforces the idea of modern society as one immense candy store, in which modern man can brazenly stuff himself. The promises that advertising holds up before us daily become reality for a moment in her photographs.

     

  • LUBBERLAND (2003)

  • LUBBERLAND (2003)

  • LUBBERLAND (2003)

  • LUBBERLAND (2003)

Bo Hai

Bo Hai

DUSK (2002)

Photography helps us preserve the past. Without this medium, memories could blur and possibly even disappear. Hai Bo uses photography to breathe new life into memories of pleasant events and places. In Dusk (2002) he places portraits of family members next to images that have played an important role in their lives. In order to bring their memories to life again, he has sought to reconstruct those relationships as sensitively as possible. However old you are, it is always nice to return to your past, says Hai Bo. 'The past is a time that is still full of dreams.'

Bo Hai >>

  • DUSK (2002)

    Photography helps us preserve the past. Without this medium, memories could blur and possibly even disappear. Hai Bo uses photography to breathe new life into memories of pleasant events and places. In Dusk (2002) he places portraits of family members next to images that have played an important role in their lives. In order to bring their memories to life again, he has sought to reconstruct those relationships as sensitively as possible. However old you are, it is always nice to return to your past, says Hai Bo. 'The past is a time that is still full of dreams.'

  • DUSK (2002)

  • DUSK (2002)

Miyako Ishiuchi

Miyako Ishiuchi

MOTHER'S 2000-2005 - TRACES OF THE FUTURE (2000-2005)

Miyako Ishiuchi's mother died in 2000. Although they never got along with each other very well, Ishiuchi was deeply affected. She decided to photograph her mother's former possessions in order to better process her death - and life. The things which she documented tell the story of a fashionable, self-confident woman. After her husband was reported missing in World War II, she earned her living as a truck driver. When she became pregnant by another man, her first husband suddenly reappeared. Divorce followed - a week before Ishiuchi was born. With her photo seriesMother's 2000-2005 - Traces of the Future Ishiuchi wanted to create 'a contact point between the present and the past'. By her own testimony, thanks to the photographs she has learned to understand her mother better.

Miyako Ishiuchi >>

  • MOTHER'S 2000-2005 - TRACES OF THE FUTURE (2000-2005)

    Miyako Ishiuchi's mother died in 2000. Although they never got along with each other very well, Ishiuchi was deeply affected. She decided to photograph her mother's former possessions in order to better process her death - and life. The things which she documented tell the story of a fashionable, self-confident woman. After her husband was reported missing in World War II, she earned her living as a truck driver. When she became pregnant by another man, her first husband suddenly reappeared. Divorce followed - a week before Ishiuchi was born. With her photo seriesMother's 2000-2005 - Traces of the Future Ishiuchi wanted to create 'a contact point between the present and the past'. By her own testimony, thanks to the photographs she has learned to understand her mother better.

     

  • MOTHER'S 2000-2005 - TRACES OF THE FUTURE (2000-2005)

  • MOTHER'S 2000-2005 - TRACES OF THE FUTURE (2000-2005)

  • MOTHER'S 2000-2005 - TRACES OF THE FUTURE (2000-2005)

  • MOTHER'S 2000-2005 - TRACES OF THE FUTURE (2000-2005)

Antonin Kratochvil

Antonin Kratochvil

VANISHING (2005)

For his project Vanishing (2005) Antonin Kratochvil spent sixteen years recording things all over the world that are being seriously harmed or on the point of disappearing. For instance, he photographed gold mining in Guyana, which involves the use of large quantities of cyanide. The use of this poisonous substance has serious consequences for the landscape and for public health. In Bolivia he focused on the once flourishing tin mining, which is now being closed down as a result of bad management. In the Congo Kratochvil photographed the illegal trade in threatened animal species, and in Ecuador the oil polluted environment. One and all, they are not issues that stand high on the world's agenda; nonetheless they have dire consequences for nature and the environment, and therefore for mankind.

Antonin Kratochvil >>

  • VANISHING (2005)

    For his project Vanishing (2005) Antonin Kratochvil spent sixteen years recording things all over the world that are being seriously harmed or on the point of disappearing. For instance, he photographed gold mining in Guyana, which involves the use of large quantities of cyanide. The use of this poisonous substance has serious consequences for the landscape and for public health. In Bolivia he focused on the once flourishing tin mining, which is now being closed down as a result of bad management. In the Congo Kratochvil photographed the illegal trade in threatened animal species, and in Ecuador the oil polluted environment. One and all, they are not issues that stand high on the world's agenda; nonetheless they have dire consequences for nature and the environment, and therefore for mankind.

  • VANISHING (2005)

  • VANISHING (2005)

  • VANISHING (2005)

  • VANISHING (2005)

Michael Lange

Michael Lange

L.A. DRIVE-BY (1996-2000)

Los Angeles is constantly recreating itself. The city has only a couple of buildings that are more than a century old. The rest of the buildings - houses, streets, shopping centers, parking places - date from the last 100 years. L.A. therefore gives the impression of having just been created. Like a contemporary archaeologist the German photographer Michael Lange went in search of L.A.'s visible history. He entered the run-down neighborhoods from the 1940s and 1950s, which are avoided by most residents of the city because of their relative age. This is the territory of the poor black population and the Latinos, where violence and drive-by shootings are the order of the day. Lange photographed the surroundings from the safety of his automobile, as a threatening, autonomous world from which the rich, white part of L.A. isolates itself.

Michael Lange >>

  • L.A. DRIVE-BY (1996-2000)

    Los Angeles is constantly recreating itself. The city has only a couple of buildings that are more than a century old. The rest of the buildings - houses, streets, shopping centers, parking places - date from the last 100 years. L.A. therefore gives the impression of having just been created. Like a contemporary archaeologist the German photographer Michael Lange went in search of L.A.'s visible history. He entered the run-down neighborhoods from the 1940s and 1950s, which are avoided by most residents of the city because of their relative age. This is the territory of the poor black population and the Latinos, where violence and drive-by shootings are the order of the day. Lange photographed the surroundings from the safety of his automobile, as a threatening, autonomous world from which the rich, white part of L.A. isolates itself.

  • L.A. DRIVE-BY (1996-2000)

  • L.A. DRIVE-BY (1996-2000)

  • L.A. DRIVE-BY (1996-2000)

Owen Logan

Owen Logan

MASQUERADE: NIGERIA HITS MICHAEL JACKSON (2000-2004)

In his satiric photo essay MASQUERADE: NIGERIA HITS MICHAEL JACKSON (2000-2004), Owen Logan had a performer impersonating Michael Jackson travel through Nigeria. Logan conceived the series after he had seen a Michael Jackson imitator perform in a Nigerian club. The audience, consisting of white expatriates, responded as if nothing had changed in the post-colonial era. It seemed as if Nigeria was still a black country made for whites. Westerners see the black population primarily as cheap labor, a role which the Nigerians accept. Logan sees Michael Jackson as a striking symbol for this. Jackson has also repudiated his roots in the pursuit of a wider white audience. Moreover, his deep connections with the record industry show strong similarities with the warmth that the Nigerian political elite entertain for the white exploiters of their nation's oil reserves.

Owen Logan >>

  • MASQUERADE: NIGERIA HITS MICHAEL JACKSON (2000-2004)

    In his satiric photo essay MASQUERADE: NIGERIA HITS MICHAEL JACKSON (2000-2004), Owen Logan had a performer impersonating Michael Jackson travel through Nigeria. Logan conceived the series after he had seen a Michael Jackson imitator perform in a Nigerian club. The audience, consisting of white expatriates, responded as if nothing had changed in the post-colonial era. It seemed as if Nigeria was still a black country made for whites. Westerners see the black population primarily as cheap labor, a role which the Nigerians accept. Logan sees Michael Jackson as a striking symbol for this. Jackson has also repudiated his roots in the pursuit of a wider white audience. Moreover, his deep connections with the record industry show strong similarities with the warmth that the Nigerian political elite entertain for the white exploiters of their nation's oil reserves.

  • MASQUERADE: NIGERIA HITS MICHAEL JACKSON (2000-2004)

  • MASQUERADE: NIGERIA HITS MICHAEL JACKSON (2000-2004)

  • MASQUERADE: NIGERIA HITS MICHAEL JACKSON (2000-2004)

  • MASQUERADE: NIGERIA HITS MICHAEL JACKSON (2000-2004)

Paula Luttringer

Paula Luttringer

THE WAILING OF THE WALLS (2000)

Paula Luttringer recorded the testimony of fifty women who had been abducted and imprisoned under the regime of the Argentine dictator Videla. She accompanied them with photographs of the about 350 clandestine prisons that Argentina had during the years 1976-1983. After the fall of the dictatorship the policemen and soldiers responsible were given amnesty. The consequence was that many women, particularly in small villages, were forced to live next to the men who had illegally imprisoned or tortured them. Only recently have these women dared to break the silence about their imprisonment and go public with their stories.

Paula Luttringer >>

  • THE WAILING OF THE WALLS (2000)

    Paula Luttringer recorded the testimony of fifty women who had been abducted and imprisoned under the regime of the Argentine dictator Videla. She accompanied them with photographs of the about 350 clandestine prisons that Argentina had during the years 1976-1983. After the fall of the dictatorship the policemen and soldiers responsible were given amnesty. The consequence was that many women, particularly in small villages, were forced to live next to the men who had illegally imprisoned or tortured them. Only recently have these women dared to break the silence about their imprisonment and go public with their stories.

  • THE WAILING OF THE WALLS (2000)

  • THE WAILING OF THE WALLS (2000)

  • THE WAILING OF THE WALLS (2000)

  • THE WAILING OF THE WALLS (2000)

David Maisel

David Maisel

THE LAKE PROJECT (2001-2004)

David Maisel's landscapes have been seriously damaged by human actions. Because they have been photographed form the air, they look surrealistic and spectacular. At the same time, at a glance it is clear just how serious the damage is. In 2001 Maisel began to record Owens Lake, THE LAKE PROJECT (2001-2004). This once covered more than two hundred square kilometers. In 1926 it almost dried up when its water was diverted to Los Angeles. The fertile vicinity changed into a barren landscape, and through its unusually high concentration of minerals the remaining water took on a red tinge. In order to combat the sandstorms that resulted from the drainage, in mid-2001 the area was again flooded. For a second time a new landscape was created as the result of large-scale human intervention.

David Maisel >>

  • THE LAKE PROJECT (2001-2004)

    David Maisel's landscapes have been seriously damaged by human actions. Because they have been photographed form the air, they look surrealistic and spectacular. At the same time, at a glance it is clear just how serious the damage is. In 2001 Maisel began to record Owens Lake, THE LAKE PROJECT (2001-2004). This once covered more than two hundred square kilometers. In 1926 it almost dried up when its water was diverted to Los Angeles. The fertile vicinity changed into a barren landscape, and through its unusually high concentration of minerals the remaining water took on a red tinge. In order to combat the sandstorms that resulted from the drainage, in mid-2001 the area was again flooded. For a second time a new landscape was created as the result of large-scale human intervention.

  • THE LAKE PROJECT (2001-2004)

  • THE LAKE PROJECT (2001-2004)

  • THE LAKE PROJECT (2001-2004)

  • THE LAKE PROJECT (2001-2004)

Hiroyuki Masuyama

Hiroyuki Masuyama

DER WEG 01.01.2001 - 31.12.2001 (2002)

From January 1 through December 31, 2001, the photographer and new media artist Hiroyuki Masuyama took a photograph on the same path every day. Each day for the first half year he moved the camera about one-and-a-half meters ahead from the point where he had taken the picture the previous day, then retraced his steps. He used this method to cover a distance of two hundred meters, forward and back again. After the end of the year he edited the photographs together into a video loop. That enables the viewer to travel the same path as the photographer, while the seasons flash by him rapidly. In DER WEG 01.01.2001 - 31.12.2001 (2002) one year is summed up in minutes.

Hiroyuki Masuyama >>

  • DER WEG 01.01.2001 - 31.12.2001 (2002)

    From January 1 through December 31, 2001, the photographer and new media artist Hiroyuki Masuyama took a photograph on the same path every day. Each day for the first half year he moved the camera about one-and-a-half meters ahead from the point where he had taken the picture the previous day, then retraced his steps. He used this method to cover a distance of two hundred meters, forward and back again. After the end of the year he edited the photographs together into a video loop. That enables the viewer to travel the same path as the photographer, while the seasons flash by him rapidly. In DER WEG 01.01.2001 - 31.12.2001 (2002) one year is summed up in minutes.

  • DER WEG 01.01.2001 - 31.12.2001 (2002)

Bradley McCallum & Jacqueline Tarry

Bradley McCallum & Jacqueline Tarry

CIVIC ENDURANCE (2003)

CIVIC ENDURANCE (2003) arose from a 26-hour-long performance. On a randomly chosen day, 26 homeless young people on the street in Seattle were asked if they were willing to pose. First they were photographed, and after that they had to stand still in front of a hidden camera for an hour. The 26 films were assembled on one DVD, played at 12 times normal speed. The result symbolized how society races past the homeless young people. It was also a meaningful act for these young people, who often struggle with psychiatric problems, drug addiction or attention deficit, to stand still in front of a camera for an hour. The sound track for CIVIL ENDURANCE consists of street noises and of the young people's stories.

Bradley McCallum & Jacqueline Tarry >>

  • CIVIC ENDURANCE (2003)

    CIVIC ENDURANCE (2003) arose from a 26-hour-long performance. On a randomly chosen day, 26 homeless young people on the street in Seattle were asked if they were willing to pose. First they were photographed, and after that they had to stand still in front of a hidden camera for an hour. The 26 films were assembled on one DVD, played at 12 times normal speed. The result symbolized how society races past the homeless young people. It was also a meaningful act for these young people, who often struggle with psychiatric problems, drug addiction or attention deficit, to stand still in front of a camera for an hour. The sound track for CIVIL ENDURANCE consists of street noises and of the young people's stories.

  • CIVIC ENDURANCE (2003)

  • CIVIC ENDURANCE (2003)

  • CIVIC ENDURANCE (2003)

  • CIVIC ENDURANCE (2003)

Christien Meindertsma

Christien Meindertsma

CHECKED BAGGAGE (2003)

Four-hundred and ten pocket knives, 211 bottle openers, twelve dart heads and a lighter in the form of a bullet. These are only a selection of the total of 3264 objects that Christien Meindertsma bought at an auction in Amsterdam. These ordinary objects were seized by Customs from more than 600,000 passengers at Schiphol in one week. All were classified as 'dangerous' after the events of 9/11. Meindertsma sorted them on the basis of shape, sort and color, thus assembling a collection of everyday things that became terrorist weapons from one day to the next. This transformation also reflects on their owners: since 9/11 air passengers with a pocket knife or nail clippers are viewed as potential terrorists.

Christien Meindertsma >>

  • CHECKED BAGGAGE (2003)

    Four-hundred and ten pocket knives, 211 bottle openers, twelve dart heads and a lighter in the form of a bullet. These are only a selection of the total of 3264 objects that Christien Meindertsma bought at an auction in Amsterdam. These ordinary objects were seized by Customs from more than 600,000 passengers at Schiphol in one week. All were classified as 'dangerous' after the events of 9/11. Meindertsma sorted them on the basis of shape, sort and color, thus assembling a collection of everyday things that became terrorist weapons from one day to the next. This transformation also reflects on their owners: since 9/11 air passengers with a pocket knife or nail clippers are viewed as potential terrorists.

  • CHECKED BAGGAGE (2003)

  • CHECKED BAGGAGE (2003)

  • CHECKED BAGGAGE (2003)

  • CHECKED BAGGAGE (2003)

Mike Mike

Mike Mike

FACE OF TOMORROW (2003-2005)

In the cosmopolitan centers that he visits, Mike Mike makes photographs of the first 100 people who will pose for him. Then he superimposes these photographs over one another digitally to produce two 'average' faces, one of a man and one of a woman. By mixing all the races and influences in a city, Mike wishes to create the face of a future resident. His montages reveal that the differences between people all over the world are becoming smaller. That is the result of increased globalization - although according to Mike Mike, in Istanbul, the crossroads of four continents and his present home, that process already began a thousand years ago.

Mike Mike >>

  • FACE OF TOMORROW (2003-2005)


    In the cosmopolitan centers that he visits, Mike Mike makes photographs of the first 100 people who will pose for him. Then he superimposes these photographs over one another digitally to produce two 'average' faces, one of a man and one of a woman. By mixing all the races and influences in a city, Mike wishes to create the face of a future resident. His montages reveal that the differences between people all over the world are becoming smaller. That is the result of increased globalization - although according to Mike Mike, in Istanbul, the crossroads of four continents and his present home, that process already began a thousand years ago.

  • FACE OF TOMORROW (2003-2005)

  • FACE OF TOMORROW (2003-2005)

  • FACE OF TOMORROW (2003-2005)

  • FACE OF TOMORROW (2003-2005)

Christopher Morris

Christopher Morris

GHOSTS OF THE CONFEDERACY (2001)

The American Civil War, which claimed more American victims than any other war America ever fought, ended in 1865. But the ghost of the losing side, the southern Confederate States, still haunts the United States. Whether at the homes of former Ku Klux Klan members, or monuments to the Civil War, or public buildings in the south, the familiar rebel flag still flies everywhere. In GHOSTS OF THE CONFEDERACY (2001) Christopher Morris recorded the traces of the Confederacy, which appear to be ineradicable in the southern states of America. Recently Mississippi decided to include the emblem of the Confederacy in its state flag. As a reaction, the black population practices their own rituals. For instance, the march for civil rights for blacks, organized in the town of Selma in 1965, is reenacted every year.

Christopher Morris >>

  • GHOSTS OF THE CONFEDERACY (2001)

    The American Civil War, which claimed more American victims than any other war America ever fought, ended in 1865. But the ghost of the losing side, the southern Confederate States, still haunts the United States. Whether at the homes of former Ku Klux Klan members, or monuments to the Civil War, or public buildings in the south, the familiar rebel flag still flies everywhere. In GHOSTS OF THE CONFEDERACY (2001) Christopher Morris recorded the traces of the Confederacy, which appear to be ineradicable in the southern states of America. Recently Mississippi decided to include the emblem of the Confederacy in its state flag. As a reaction, the black population practices their own rituals. For instance, the march for civil rights for blacks, organized in the town of Selma in 1965, is reenacted every year.

  • GHOSTS OF THE CONFEDERACY (2001)

  • GHOSTS OF THE CONFEDERACY (2001)

  • GHOSTS OF THE CONFEDERACY (2001)

  • GHOSTS OF THE CONFEDERACY (2001)

Michael Najjar

Michael Najjar

INFORMATION AND APOCALYPSE (2003)

The events of September 11, 2001, have had great consequences, not in the least for our perception of things, says Michael Najjar. The manner in which the media treat war and terrorism has changed drastically since then. The war in Iraq could be followed live on broadcasters such as CNN, sometimes even 24 hours a day. The reporting was often exciting and spectacular, and drew strongly on the vocabulary of Hollywood films. Furthermore, there was the question of to what extent one could even call this reporting: wasn't it really directed by the Pentagon? For INFORMATION AND APOCALYPSE (2003) Michael Najjar mixed images of September 11 and the Iraq war with his own photo work, thus providing a new context for information from the media. With this unique visual editing he shows how the invasion of Iraq and the war on terror is first and foremost a media event.

Michael Najjar >>

  • INFORMATION AND APOCALYPSE (2003)

    The events of September 11, 2001, have had great consequences, not in the least for our perception of things, says Michael Najjar. The manner in which the media treat war and terrorism has changed drastically since then. The war in Iraq could be followed live on broadcasters such as CNN, sometimes even 24 hours a day. The reporting was often exciting and spectacular, and drew strongly on the vocabulary of Hollywood films. Furthermore, there was the question of to what extent one could even call this reporting: wasn't it really directed by the Pentagon? For INFORMATION AND APOCALYPSE (2003) Michael Najjar mixed images of September 11 and the Iraq war with his own photo work, thus providing a new context for information from the media. With this unique visual editing he shows how the invasion of Iraq and the war on terror is first and foremost a media event.

  • INFORMATION AND APOCALYPSE (2003)

  • INFORMATION AND APOCALYPSE (2003)

  • INFORMATION AND APOCALYPSE (2003)

  • INFORMATION AND APOCALYPSE (2003)

  • INFORMATION AND APOCALYPSE (2003)

  • NETROPOLIS (2003-2005)

    The Industrial Revolution changed the face of the large metropolises radically. The impact of digitization is no less great. To an important extent computers and computer networks define the development of the urban landscape. Cities no longer exist in a physical sense alone, but also have a digital double. The city itself has become a mixture of physical and digital space. Michael Najjar visualizes this new, partly invisible landscape in NETROPOLIS (2003-2005) (photo and video). From various angles he made panoramas of cities such as Berlin, Paris and Tokyo and pasted these over each other. The result is a landscape of lines which can be read as a carpet of digital relations, under which the contours of the selected cities remain visible.

Osamu James Nakagawa

Osamu James Nakagawa

MA - BETWEEN THE PAST (2003-2005)

A suitcase stood for years in the studio of James Nakagawa. His father had given him the suitcase shortly before he died. When he eventually gathered the courage to open it, he found a collection of films and photographs that his father and grandfather had made during their lives. Nakagawa interwove this material with photographs that he himself made over the course of time, to produce a visual family history spanning three generations. He called the work MA, after a Japanese term for the space between two entities - not only for the gulf between past and present, but also because of the division of his family history between America and Japan.

Osamu James Nakagawa >>

  • MA - BETWEEN THE PAST (2003-2005)

    A suitcase stood for years in the studio of James Nakagawa. His father had given him the suitcase shortly before he died. When he eventually gathered the courage to open it, he found a collection of films and photographs that his father and grandfather had made during their lives. Nakagawa interwove this material with photographs that he himself made over the course of time, to produce a visual family history spanning three generations. He called the work MA, after a Japanese term for the space between two entities - not only for the gulf between past and present, but also because of the division of his family history between America and Japan.

  • MA - BETWEEN THE PAST (2003-2005)

  • MA - BETWEEN THE PAST (2003-2005)

  • MA - BETWEEN THE PAST (2003-2005)

  • MA - BETWEEN THE PAST (2003-2005)

Liza Nguyen

Liza Nguyen

SOUVENIRS OF VIETNAM (2004)

It was thirty years ago that Saigon fell to the Communists. In SOUVENIRS OF VIETNAM (2004) Liza Nguyen commemorates this event in the Vietnam War with two series. SURFACE shows small bits of ground coming from historic locations in Vietnam, such as My Lai, known for the American massacre of Vietnamese civilians there. Today the war still permeates the soil of Vietnam, says Nguyen - not only for the many victims, but also through the contamination which resulted from the use of Agent Orange. POSTCARDS is a parody on the picture post cards that are sold to tourists in Vietnam. In place of the usual landscapes of temples, her cards are printed with war monuments, ordnance and war victims - things that are equally inextricably linked with the history of Vietnam.

Liza Nguyen >>

  • SOUVENIRS OF VIETNAM (2004)

    It was thirty years ago that Saigon fell to the Communists. In SOUVENIRS OF VIETNAM (2004) Liza Nguyen commemorates this event in the Vietnam War with two series. SURFACE shows small bits of ground coming from historic locations in Vietnam, such as My Lai, known for the American massacre of Vietnamese civilians there. Today the war still permeates the soil of Vietnam, says Nguyen - not only for the many victims, but also through the contamination which resulted from the use of Agent Orange. POSTCARDS is a parody on the picture post cards that are sold to tourists in Vietnam. In place of the usual landscapes of temples, her cards are printed with war monuments, ordnance and war victims - things that are equally inextricably linked with the history of Vietnam.

  • SOUVENIRS OF VIETNAM (2004)

  • SOUVENIRS OF VIETNAM (2004)

  • SOUVENIRS OF VIETNAM (2004)

  • SOUVENIRS OF VIETNAM (2004)

Trent Parke

Trent Parke

MINUTES TO MIDNIGHT (2004)

Australia is aptly named 'the lucky country'. The climate is sunny, the beaches are beautiful, the residents relaxed and its isolated location has kept the country out of major conflicts. But something has changed in recent years. Severe drought, widespread fires, plagues of insects and an economic crisis have given the people a feeling that their country has lost its innocence. According to polls, about half of Australians think that times have changed for good. With a tent, a four-wheel-drive vehicle and a camera, Trent Parke journeyed for two years from beach to bush. He documented the uncertain state of his native country in MINUTES TO MIDNIGHT (2004), an ominous travel document that examines the emotions of this time.

Trent Parke >>

  • MINUTES TO MIDNIGHT (2004)

    Australia is aptly named 'the lucky country'. The climate is sunny, the beaches are beautiful, the residents relaxed and its isolated location has kept the country out of major conflicts. But something has changed in recent years. Severe drought, widespread fires, plagues of insects and an economic crisis have given the people a feeling that their country has lost its innocence. According to polls, about half of Australians think that times have changed for good. With a tent, a four-wheel-drive vehicle and a camera, Trent Parke journeyed for two years from beach to bush. He documented the uncertain state of his native country in MINUTES TO MIDNIGHT (2004), an ominous travel document that examines the emotions of this time.

  • MINUTES TO MIDNIGHT (2004)

  • MINUTES TO MIDNIGHT (2004)

  • MINUTES TO MIDNIGHT (2004)

  • MINUTES TO MIDNIGHT (2004)

Zhijie Qiu

Zhijie Qiu

BLACKBOARDS (2004)

As a teenager Zhijie Qiu often came home late because he had been working at school on a 'chalkboard newspaper'. These newspapers consist of a mix of news items and announcements that are generally posted on a chalkboard in calligraphy. The content can be anything from political news and propaganda to burglary prevention tips and information about personal hygiene or the SARS outbreak. In China there are chalkboard newspapers everywhere, in army barracks, factories and schools, both in the cities and in the countryside. Their national presence makes them a barometer of public attitudes, an expression of the 'hopes and fears of my times', as Zhijie calls them. Despite the great influence of radio and television, the chalkboard newspapers retain undiminished popularity in China. Zhijie Qiu photographed a large number of them in BLACKBOARDS (2004) and edited them into collages.

Zhijie Qiu >>

  • BLACKBOARDS (2004)

    As a teenager Zhijie Qiu often came home late because he had been working at school on a 'chalkboard newspaper'. These newspapers consist of a mix of news items and announcements that are generally posted on a chalkboard in calligraphy. The content can be anything from political news and propaganda to burglary prevention tips and information about personal hygiene or the SARS outbreak. In China there are chalkboard newspapers everywhere, in army barracks, factories and schools, both in the cities and in the countryside. Their national presence makes them a barometer of public attitudes, an expression of the 'hopes and fears of my times', as Zhijie calls them. Despite the great influence of radio and television, the chalkboard newspapers retain undiminished popularity in China. Zhijie Qiu photographed a large number of them in BLACKBOARDS (2004) and edited them into collages.

  • BLACKBOARDS (2004)

Orit Raff

Orit Raff

INSIDE DRAWING (1997-2004)

The installation INSIDE DRAWING (1997-2004) contains photographs that Orit Raff took at schools in New York. According to Raff the school years play a crucial role in forming our memory: for the first time the familiar atmosphere at home is exchanged for a social environment. She photographed apparently trivial things, such as carvings on desks and the marks left after erasing chalkboards. Over the years these increasingly numerous vestiges grew into small histories, which form palpable memories of the school years that are so important for human development. By photographing the scruffy spots in isolation, Raff gives them an unexpected beauty.

Orit Raff >>

  • INSIDE DRAWING (1997-2004)


    The installation INSIDE DRAWING (1997-2004) contains photographs that Orit Raff took at schools in New York. According to Raff the school years play a crucial role in forming our memory: for the first time the familiar atmosphere at home is exchanged for a social environment. She photographed apparently trivial things, such as carvings on desks and the marks left after erasing chalkboards. Over the years these increasingly numerous vestiges grew into small histories, which form palpable memories of the school years that are so important for human development. By photographing the scruffy spots in isolation, Raff gives them an unexpected beauty.

  • INSIDE DRAWING (1997-2004)

  • INSIDE DRAWING (1997-2004)

  • INSIDE DRAWING (1997-2004)

  • INSIDE DRAWING (1997-2004)

Martin Roemers

Martin Roemers

RELICS OF THE COLD WAR (1998-2004)

Every war, lost or won, has its monuments and places of remembrance - except, noted Martin Roemers, the Cold War. At the most, there are still traces of it in the landscape, which will disappear with the passage of time. In RELICS OF THE COLD WAR (1998-2004) Roemers focuses on the physical remains of this war which was never really fought. He photographed former barracks, old bunkers, deserted atomic bomb shelters and left over military ordnance. The Cold War was a period with massive armies and immense defense expenditures. This era of tension between East and West came to an end in 1989, with the fall of the Berlin Wall.

Martin Roemers >>

  • RELICS OF THE COLD WAR (1998-2004)

    Every war, lost or won, has its monuments and places of remembrance - except, noted Martin Roemers, the Cold War. At the most, there are still traces of it in the landscape, which will disappear with the passage of time. In RELICS OF THE COLD WAR (1998-2004) Roemers focuses on the physical remains of this war which was never really fought. He photographed former barracks, old bunkers, deserted atomic bomb shelters and left over military ordnance. The Cold War was a period with massive armies and immense defense expenditures. This era of tension between East and West came to an end in 1989, with the fall of the Berlin Wall.

  • RELICS OF THE COLD WAR (1998-2004)

Ken Schles

Ken Schles

HOMELAND SECURITY (2004-2005)

As a resident of New York, Ken Schles witnessed the attack on the Twin Towers. He photographed the tragedy, which according to him lead to a new world order in which fear reigned. Since September 11 the manner of waging war has changed, says Schles. In terms of tactics, psychology and propaganda, the battlefield has moved from a military terrain to civil society. Schles recorded the consequences for daily life in New York. For HOMELAND SECURITY (2004-2005) he photographed quiet, loving and ominous moments and mixed these with photographs of places that are considered likely targets for terrorist attacks, creating a reflection on safe places that from one day to the next change into dangerous territory.

Ken Schles >>

  • HOMELAND SECURITY (2004-2005)

    As a resident of New York, Ken Schles witnessed the attack on the Twin Towers. He photographed the tragedy, which according to him lead to a new world order in which fear reigned. Since September 11 the manner of waging war has changed, says Schles. In terms of tactics, psychology and propaganda, the battlefield has moved from a military terrain to civil society. Schles recorded the consequences for daily life in New York. For HOMELAND SECURITY (2004-2005) he photographed quiet, loving and ominous moments and mixed these with photographs of places that are considered likely targets for terrorist attacks, creating a reflection on safe places that from one day to the next change into dangerous territory.

  • HOMELAND SECURITY (2004-2005)

  • HOMELAND SECURITY (2004-2005)

  • HOMELAND SECURITY (2004-2005)

  • HOMELAND SECURITY (2004-2005)

Dominique Steiner

Dominique Steiner

CHRONOTOPE (2003)

The installation CHRONOTOPE (2003) is a modern interpretation of the work of Caspar David Friedrich (1774-1840), a prominent landscape painter in German Romanticism. He often painted figures standing with their back to the viewer, engrossed in the vast landscape which lies before both. Dominique Steiner placed a number of people in a similar position and had them stare at a series of contemporary landscapes. That invites the spectator to engage in the same reflection as on seeing a Friedrich painting: what are these persons thinking? What are they looking at? What would their face tell? This brings us into the same position as the persons we are looking at, and we become one with their meditation. We become engrossed in the installation, thereby stepping into another time and place.

Dominique Steiner >>

  • CHRONOTOPE (2003)

    The installation CHRONOTOPE (2003) is a modern interpretation of the work of Caspar David Friedrich (1774-1840), a prominent landscape painter in German Romanticism. He often painted figures standing with their back to the viewer, engrossed in the vast landscape which lies before both. Dominique Steiner placed a number of people in a similar position and had them stare at a series of contemporary landscapes. That invites the spectator to engage in the same reflection as on seeing a Friedrich painting: what are these persons thinking? What are they looking at? What would their face tell? This brings us into the same position as the persons we are looking at, and we become one with their meditation. We become engrossed in the installation, thereby stepping into another time and place.

  • CHRONOTOPE (2003)

  • CHRONOTOPE (2003)

  • CHRONOTOPE (2003)

  • CHRONOTOPE (2003)

Anoek Steketee

Anoek Steketee

FRONTSTAGE (2004-2005)

Out of curiosity about the reality quotient of the image that Western media present of Iran, Anoek Steketee traveled to that country herself. She began her own research into the position of the individual in Iranian society, and discovered that different norms and rules were in operation. Within the confines of one's own home people live in a relatively free manner, but on the streets the mores of the Islamic society were imposed. As an outsider, Steketee experienced public life in Iran as a theater performance with surrealistic features. To give form to her dissociation, for FRONTSTAGE (2004-2005) she asked random Iranians on the street to pose for her while they pictured themselves playing out an imaginary theater scene.

Anoek Steketee >>

  • FRONTSTAGE (2004-2005)

    Out of curiosity about the reality quotient of the image that Western media present of Iran, Anoek Steketee traveled to that country herself. She began her own research into the position of the individual in Iranian society, and discovered that different norms and rules were in operation. Within the confines of one's own home people live in a relatively free manner, but on the streets the mores of the Islamic society were imposed. As an outsider, Steketee experienced public life in Iran as a theater performance with surrealistic features. To give form to her dissociation, for FRONTSTAGE (2004-2005) she asked random Iranians on the street to pose for her while they pictured themselves playing out an imaginary theater scene.

  • FRONTSTAGE (2004-2005)

  • FRONTSTAGE (2004-2005)

  • FRONTSTAGE (2004-2005)

  • FRONTSTAGE (2004-2005)

Angela Strassheim

Angela Strassheim

LEFT BEHIND (2005)

Angela Strassheim grew up in a family of 'born-again' Christians, who came to their present faith as the result of a conversion experience after childhood. With the series LEFT BEHIND (2005) she examines the world of these Christians, to whom, for instance, George W. Bush also belongs. Strassheim made portraits of her family and interspersed these with domestic images that are inspired by her youth. The result is a portrait of a self-satisfied world that revolves around control and belief. Under the perfect-looking surface lurks a disturbing mental world, which condemns non-believers and affords room for only their own inviolable truth. In the title, LEFT BEHIND, Strassheim refers both to what 'born-agains' believe will happen to non-believers when the expected 'rapture' takes place, but also to the choice these Christians have made to shut themselves off in a world entirely of their own.

Angela Strassheim >>

  • LEFT BEHIND (2005)

    Angela Strassheim grew up in a family of 'born-again' Christians, who came to their present faith as the result of a conversion experience after childhood. With the series LEFT BEHIND (2005) she examines the world of these Christians, to whom, for instance, George W. Bush also belongs. Strassheim made portraits of her family and interspersed these with domestic images that are inspired by her youth. The result is a portrait of a self-satisfied world that revolves around control and belief. Under the perfect-looking surface lurks a disturbing mental world, which condemns non-believers and affords room for only their own inviolable truth. In the title, LEFT BEHIND, Strassheim refers both to what 'born-agains' believe will happen to non-believers when the expected 'rapture' takes place, but also to the choice these Christians have made to shut themselves off in a world entirely of their own.

  • LEFT BEHIND (2005)

  • LEFT BEHIND (2005)

  • LEFT BEHIND (2005)

  • LEFT BEHIND (2005)

Ali Taptik

Ali Taptik

REMEMBERING ME (2001-2005)

Since he began photographing in 2001 Ali Taptik has been documenting his life in Turkey's largest city, Istanbul. But for him, reality is only the raw material. He creates his own reality with his photography. He rearranges relations, plays with facial expressions, and changes the atmosphere. In this way he constructs a new personal history that - as he himself says - 'is as real as the pictures I make'. Memories can blur, but photographs will continue to exist. Thus it is plausible that REMEMBERING ME (2001-2005), Taptik's fictional autobiography will ultimately replace his personal history, not only for those who view the photographs, but also for Taptik himself.

Ali Taptik >>

  • REMEMBERING ME (2001-2005)

    Since he began photographing in 2001 Ali Taptik has been documenting his life in Turkey's largest city, Istanbul. But for him, reality is only the raw material. He creates his own reality with his photography. He rearranges relations, plays with facial expressions, and changes the atmosphere. In this way he constructs a new personal history that - as he himself says - 'is as real as the pictures I make'. Memories can blur, but photographs will continue to exist. Thus it is plausible that REMEMBERING ME (2001-2005), Taptik's fictional autobiography will ultimately replace his personal history, not only for those who view the photographs, but also for Taptik himself.

  • REMEMBERING ME (2001-2005)

  • REMEMBERING ME (2001-2005)

  • REMEMBERING ME (2001-2005)

  • REMEMBERING ME (2001-2005)

Annet van der Voort

Annet van der Voort

A LIFETIME (1998-1999)

A LIFETIME (1998-1999) consists of a number of large portraits of old women and a series of small photographs of beauty queens, which were made in the time that the old women were still young. The still prevailing ideals about beauty and youth are thus placed next to the natural aging process that everyone goes through: an idealized image is linked through time with a face upon which life has left its mark. Is it possible that we are dealing with the same women? With A LIFETIME Annet van der Voort calls up questions about youth, age and beauty. How long can beauty be maintained? What does out mortality do with us?

Annet van der Voort >>

  • A LIFETIME (1998-1999)

    A LIFETIME (1998-1999) consists of a number of large portraits of old women and a series of small photographs of beauty queens, which were made in the time that the old women were still young. The still prevailing ideals about beauty and youth are thus placed next to the natural aging process that everyone goes through: an idealized image is linked through time with a face upon which life has left its mark. Is it possible that we are dealing with the same women? With A LIFETIME Annet van der Voort calls up questions about youth, age and beauty. How long can beauty be maintained? What does out mortality do with us?

  • A LIFETIME (1998-1999)

  • A LIFETIME (1998-1999)

  • A LIFETIME (1998-1999)

  • A LIFETIME (1998-1999)

Danwen Xing

Danwen Xing

URBAN FICTION (2004-2005)

The idea for URBAN FICTION (2004-2005) arose when Danwen Xing made a train trip through Europe. She realized that cities all over the world are starting to look increasingly alike. Housing people has chiefly become a matter of putting as many of them as possible in impersonal high-rises. According to the photographer, dwellings of this sort only come to life if the residents put something of their own personality and drama into them. In order to get a head start on this, she put herself into maquettes of future Chinese residential projects. She provides the buildings with atmosphere by playing various fictional roles. 'One time I am an overworked secretary,' she says, 'and another time I am a young woman who had murdered her love by accident.'

Danwen Xing >>

  • URBAN FICTION (2004-2005)


    The idea for URBAN FICTION (2004-2005) arose when Danwen Xing made a train trip through Europe. She realized that cities all over the world are starting to look increasingly alike. Housing people has chiefly become a matter of putting as many of them as possible in impersonal high-rises. According to the photographer, dwellings of this sort only come to life if the residents put something of their own personality and drama into them. In order to get a head start on this, she put herself into maquettes of future Chinese residential projects. She provides the buildings with atmosphere by playing various fictional roles. 'One time I am an overworked secretary,' she says, 'and another time I am a young woman who had murdered her love by accident.'

  • URBAN FICTION (2004-2005)

  • URBAN FICTION (2004-2005)

  • URBAN FICTION (2004-2005)

  • URBAN FICTION (2004-2005)

  • URBAN FICTION (2004-2005)

  • URBAN FICTION (2004-2005)

  • URBAN FICTION (2004-2005)

  • URBAN FICTION (2004-2005)

  • URBAN FICTION (2004-2005)

Francesco Zizola

Francesco Zizola

MOZAMBIQUE: AIDS - THE SILENT ATOMIC BOMB (2002)

More than a million people in Mozambique are HIV positive - 13% of the population. Treatment for the virus costs 350 dollars per person for a year, but the annual budget for health care is only 10 dollars per year per head. As a consequence of AIDS, life expectancy in Mozambique will have fallen from 43 to 27 by 2010, a level not seen since the 19th century. Photographer Francesco Zizola documented the crisis, and took its title MOZAMBIQUE: AIDS - THE SILENT ATOMIC BOMB (2002) from a speech by the prime minister of the country. He had warned that the consequences of AIDS are greater for the continent than if an atomic bomb had been dropped on Africa. In the latter case, at least the international community would have reacted, Zizola thinks. As it is, the 'silent atomic bomb' continues to explode, without the world doing anything.

Francesco Zizola >>

  • MOZAMBIQUE: AIDS - THE SILENT ATOMIC BOMB (2002)

    More than a million people in Mozambique are HIV positive - 13% of the population. Treatment for the virus costs 350 dollars per person for a year, but the annual budget for health care is only 10 dollars per year per head. As a consequence of AIDS, life expectancy in Mozambique will have fallen from 43 to 27 by 2010, a level not seen since the 19th century. Photographer Francesco Zizola documented the crisis, and took its title MOZAMBIQUE: AIDS - THE SILENT ATOMIC BOMB (2002) from a speech by the prime minister of the country. He had warned that the consequences of AIDS are greater for the continent than if an atomic bomb had been dropped on Africa. In the latter case, at least the international community would have reacted, Zizola thinks. As it is, the 'silent atomic bomb' continues to explode, without the world doing anything.

  • MOZAMBIQUE: AIDS - THE SILENT ATOMIC BOMB (2002)

  • MOZAMBIQUE: AIDS - THE SILENT ATOMIC BOMB (2002)

  • MOZAMBIQUE: AIDS - THE SILENT ATOMIC BOMB (2002)

  • MOZAMBIQUE: AIDS - THE SILENT ATOMIC BOMB (2002)

Tsunami

Sasha Bezzubov

Sasha Bezzubov

Things Fall Apart

Sasha Bezzubov has photographed the scenes of natural disasters all over the world. He visited Indonesia and Thailand soon after the tsunami. What he encountered there corresponded with his previous experiences: the immense forces of nature had changed the area into a surrealistic, apocalyptic landscape. Survivors wandered around vacantly, in search of their possessions. Bezzubov got the feeling that he had landed in a futuristic doom scenario. He imagined himself to be one of the last witnesses to the end of the world. He made Things Fall Apart (2004) in the style of traditional landscape photography, a picture of a future in which nature takes revenge for everything that mankind has done to it.

Sasha Bezzubov >>

  • Things Fall Apart

    Sasha Bezzubov has photographed the scenes of natural disasters all over the world. He visited Indonesia and Thailand soon after the tsunami. What he encountered there corresponded with his previous experiences: the immense forces of nature had changed the area into a surrealistic, apocalyptic landscape. Survivors wandered around vacantly, in search of their possessions. Bezzubov got the feeling that he had landed in a futuristic doom scenario. He imagined himself to be one of the last witnesses to the end of the world. He made Things Fall Apart (2004) in the style of traditional landscape photography, a picture of a future in which nature takes revenge for everything that mankind has done to it.

  • Things Fall Apart

  • Things Fall Apart

  • Things Fall Apart

  • Things Fall Apart

Stephen Dupont

Stephen Dupont

Tsunami Aftermath

In January, 2005, two weeks after the sea-floor quake and the resulting tsunami, Stephen Dupont traveled to Banda Aceh in Indonesia, the city that lay closest to the epicenter of the event. There he was a witness to the destructive force that nature can exert on man. The flood wave, which claimed hundreds of thousands of lives throughout Southeast Asia and left millions of people homeless, had as good as erased Banda Aceh from the earth. There remained only chaos and misery. Even the survivors who sought the remains of their homes looked like zombies, says Dupont. 'There was no more emotion in that place. Everything was dead or lost.'

Stephen Dupont >>

  • Tsunami Aftermath

    In January, 2005, two weeks after the sea-floor quake and the resulting tsunami, Stephen Dupont traveled to Banda Aceh in Indonesia, the city that lay closest to the epicenter of the event. There he was a witness to the destructive force that nature can exert on man. The flood wave, which claimed hundreds of thousands of lives throughout Southeast Asia and left millions of people homeless, had as good as erased Banda Aceh from the earth. There remained only chaos and misery. Even the survivors who sought the remains of their homes looked like zombies, says Dupont. 'There was no more emotion in that place. Everything was dead or lost.'

  • Tsunami Aftermath

  • Tsunami Aftermath

  • Tsunami Aftermath

  • Tsunami Aftermath

Joakim Eneroth

Joakim Eneroth

Waiting

The Waiting (2005) series was made on the Thai coast in the weeks after the tsunami. By that time the media from all over the world had already shown an avalanche of images in which the drama had been illuminated from every conceivable angle. With Waiting Joakim Eneroth asks primarily for reflection and contemplation, without immediately aiming at strong emotion. His photographs call on us to once again summon before our mind's eye and quietly reflect on the many images of the tsunami that we remember. In that way they will have the space that in all likelihood they did not have in the first, massive consumption, focused as it often was on sensation. By photographing the sea both calm and threatening, Eneroth moreover gives shape to the unpredictability of nature.

Joakim Eneroth >>

  • Waiting

    The Waiting (2005) series was made on the Thai coast in the weeks after the tsunami. By that time the media from all over the world had already shown an avalanche of images in which the drama had been illuminated from every conceivable angle. With Waiting Joakim Eneroth asks primarily for reflection and contemplation, without immediately aiming at strong emotion. His photographs call on us to once again summon before our mind's eye and quietly reflect on the many images of the tsunami that we remember. In that way they will have the space that in all likelihood they did not have in the first, massive consumption, focused as it often was on sensation. By photographing the sea both calm and threatening, Eneroth moreover gives shape to the unpredictability of nature.

  • Waiting

  • Waiting

  • Waiting

  • Waiting

Mohamed Iqbal

Mohamed Iqbal

Faces of the Survivors

Anyone who did not experience the tsunami personally experienced the disaster via the media. But the images in the media were often superficial and focused on sensation, Mohamed Iqbal believes. Victims were not presented as individuals, but as pawns in the drama. 'They were reduced to an element in a sensational and overwhelming visual presentation,' says the photographer. With Faces of the Survivors (2005) he wants to reveal the true identity of the tsunami's victims. He shows their faces, which bear the traces of the disaster, but at the same time radiate hope; ultimately, they have survived the disaster. Iqbal presents his photographs life-sized. By this he wants to emphasize their will to survive and the respect that he has for them as a photographer.

Mohamed Iqbal >>

  • Faces of the Survivors

    Anyone who did not experience the tsunami personally experienced the disaster via the media. But the images in the media were often superficial and focused on sensation, Mohamed Iqbal believes. Victims were not presented as individuals, but as pawns in the drama. 'They were reduced to an element in a sensational and overwhelming visual presentation,' says the photographer. With Faces of the Survivors (2005) he wants to reveal the true identity of the tsunami's victims. He shows their faces, which bear the traces of the disaster, but at the same time radiate hope; ultimately, they have survived the disaster. Iqbal presents his photographs life-sized. By this he wants to emphasize their will to survive and the respect that he has for them as a photographer.

  • Faces of the Survivors

  • Faces of the Survivors

  • Faces of the Survivors

  • Faces of the Survivors

Helen Kudrich

Helen Kudrich

Tsunami Evidence

Children's toys, women's underwear, a man's shoe: they lie half-hidden in the mud, ordinary objects that apparently must do without an owner. Who did they belong to, why are they here, what do they say about their former owner? And the most important question these still-lifes provoke: what happened here? The images in Tsunami Evidence (2005) were made on the west coast of Thailand, soon after the tsunami. Helen Kudrich photographed the expensive tourist resorts, overwhelmingly populated by Western tourists, which had been destroyed by the flood wave. Kudrich believes the contrast between the originally so luxurious objects and the forlorn appearance they now offer says something about human vulnerability and the false feelings of security that possessions give.

Helen Kudrich >>

  • Tsunami Evidence

    Children's toys, women's underwear, a man's shoe: they lie half-hidden in the mud, ordinary objects that apparently must do without an owner. Who did they belong to, why are they here, what do they say about their former owner? And the most important question these still-lifes provoke: what happened here? The images in Tsunami Evidence (2005) were made on the west coast of Thailand, soon after the tsunami. Helen Kudrich photographed the expensive tourist resorts, overwhelmingly populated by Western tourists, which had been destroyed by the flood wave. Kudrich believes the contrast between the originally so luxurious objects and the forlorn appearance they now offer says something about human vulnerability and the false feelings of security that possessions give.

  • Tsunami Evidence

  • Tsunami Evidence

  • Tsunami Evidence

  • Tsunami Evidence

Massimo Mastrorillo

Massimo Mastrorillo

Indonesia 2005: Just Another Day

Massimo Mastrorillo photographed the consequences of the tsunami in hard-hit Banda Aceh. At the same time, he noted that in the rest of Indonesia there was likewise a struggle to survive, for instance in the slums along the railway line in Jakarta or in the small Catholic community of Saint Egidio, which has to maintain itself in the middle of the largest Moslem nation in the world. Even aside from the effects of the tsunami the natural environment also takes a battering. In Pekambara oil extraction causes immense damage to the environment. Seeing that, Mastrorillo suggests in INDONESIA 2005: JUST ANOTHER DAY (2005), one almost gets the impression that with the tsunami nature is wanting to take revenge on man.

Massimo Mastrorillo >>

  • Indonesia 2005: Just Another Day

    Massimo Mastrorillo photographed the consequences of the tsunami in hard-hit Banda Aceh. At the same time, he noted that in the rest of Indonesia there was likewise a struggle to survive, for instance in the slums along the railway line in Jakarta or in the small Catholic community of Saint Egidio, which has to maintain itself in the middle of the largest Moslem nation in the world. Even aside from the effects of the tsunami the natural environment also takes a battering. In Pekambara oil extraction causes immense damage to the environment. Seeing that, Mastrorillo suggests in INDONESIA 2005: JUST ANOTHER DAY (2005), one almost gets the impression that with the tsunami nature is wanting to take revenge on man.

  • Indonesia 2005: Just Another Day

  • Indonesia 2005: Just Another Day

  • Indonesia 2005: Just Another Day

  • Indonesia 2005: Just Another Day

Promised Land

Anders Petersen

Anders Petersen

Anders Petersen >>

Adrienne van Eekelen

Adrienne van Eekelen

Adrienne van Eekelen >>

Antoine d'Agata

Antoine d'Agata

Antoine d'Agata >>

John Davies

John Davies

John Davies >>

Ken Schles

Ken Schles

Ken Schles >>

Hidden Sites

Terri Weifenbach

Terri Weifenbach

Terri Weifenbach >>

Machiel Botman

Machiel Botman

Machiel Botman >>

Andreas Gefeller

Andreas Gefeller

Andreas Gefeller >>

Marco Wiegers

Marco Wiegers

Marco Wiegers >>